Diego Semerene

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For 253 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Miss Kiet's Children
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 93 out of 253
253 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    This is a film that isn’t afraid to inhabit the maddening ambivalence of pleasure, recognizing that desire simply doesn’t recognize good manners.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Childhood in Peter Lataster and Petra Lataster-Czisch's documentary is the terrain of contradiction and ambiguity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    One of the most distinct pleasures of Beginners is the way it puts together fragments of someone's life-presumably the filmmaker's, although little does it matter-with humility, and without vying for some complete whole.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Tomboy is one of those little big films whose simplicity and concision suggest the excess of meaning that language (cinematic or otherwise) could never account for.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    The documentary exists within the very restricted pantheon of films that successfully reap the cinematic potential of pedagogy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Alain Guiraudie's film portrays cruising as a danger-seeking and astoundingly repetitive affair, intimately linked to death itself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Like most great essay films, Paraguay Remembered is driven by associations not just with art works with which it shares a kinship, but a stream-of-conscious relationship between word and image.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe's documentary raises important questions about the limits of pedagogy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Cinema hasn't been this close to the dusty cogs of desire's machinery and unapologetic about pleasure since Pasolini.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Lili Horvát’s film delights in wallowing in ambiguity, contradiction, and doubt.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The simplicity of bodies barely moving before a camera that brings their quotidian temporality into a halt is nothing short of a radical proposition in our digital era.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    There’s something liberating about such a steady creative hand that rejects justifying the twists and turns of a storyline, which becomes in 4 Days in France something akin to cruising itself.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The landscape seems to push the characters away at the same time that it anchors them into place, suggesting that elsewhere is a promise that only dreams can keep.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Dating Amber rather seamlessly strips itself of its hyperbolic affectations to reveal a heartbreaking story of emancipation through friendship.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    In the logic of the film, for the camera to move at all would feel like a betrayal of its contemplative hunger.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    A raw, sophisticated, and stomach-turning look at what it means to be a young woman in Serbia, what it means to be a woman tout court.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Cruising for Alain Guiraudie seems to be the way of nature, a drive that doesn't discriminate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Václav Marhoul’s film is at its most magnificent when it lingers on the poetry of its images.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Filmmakers Laura Amelia Guzmán and Israel Cárdenas have crafted a beautiful tale of alienation, solitude, and existential anxiety.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    It's a quiet thud of a film, which embraces, with grace and precision, the nastiness of growing up with desire stuck in one's throat like a muffled scream.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Very few films accept the contradicting velocities of gay desire, and present them in such blunt yet graceful fashion, the way Paris 05:59 does.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film reminds us that without investigative reporting there’s no democracy, and that traditional expectations around impartiality and objectivity may be untenable in the face of horror.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film enables us to feel the emotional weight of a posthumous letter precisely because we can only imagine its contents.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film renders visible a very complicated, and awfully repressed, truth not only about gay desire, but desire in general.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Mitra Farahani rescues the doc from becoming a talking-head fest by embracing her creative self as a character and exposing the travails of her own authorship process.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film exposes the idea of places as metaphors, mirrors, and symptoms for the people who inhabit them.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Bleakness, Arturo Ripstein's film implies, demands different kinds of labor from a man than from a woman.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The pleasure in watching the film becomes a linguistic one as Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart masterfully sharpen their words and hurl them at each other like projectiles out of a blowpipe.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Elite Squad: The Enemy Within is pure pedagogic bliss.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Francis Lee captures not only what masculinity does and how it comes undone, but the complex apparatus that keeps it into place: the family’s surveillance, the silence, the shame.

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