Dorothy Rabinowitz

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For 280 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dorothy Rabinowitz's Scores

Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Prohibition
Lowest review score: 10 Graceland: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 280
280 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    "Sweetbitter" returns for a second season Sunday on Starz, powered, like its first, with unfailing wit, superbly conceived characters, and confidence in its own strength. That last thoroughly justified essential comes shining through every scene of this series.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It yields no revelatory light to speak of on its subject.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Unalloyed caricature of a political biography. ... Some filmmaker may one day undertake the story of Roger Ailes, Fox News, the rise of the modern Republican Party and the presidency of Donald Trump and make it a worthy enterprise. Something that can’t be said of this series, which has all the nuance of a long rap sheet plus indictment in its predictability, its driving effort to establish its case—and which, like those tummlers of old, can leave an audience longing for the end of the act.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A spectacularly ambitious enterprise of unfailing power, rich in all the ways that matter in drama, in writing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [A] smashing tale alive with heart and wit.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The series traces, in vivid detail, the struggle to aid black progress in this period and its powerful opposition. ... A rich four hours, including the birth and purpose of the Ku Klux Klan, the way in which black Americans responded, and without anything resembling a dull moment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There’s nothing Michelle Williams can do, no lines written for her to say, that can dim the luster of her performance in this series, which owes everything to her and to Sam Rockwell, and to the exhilarating, if all too brief, musical numbers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The HBO version’s ambitious, complex and deeply detailed narrative delivers dimension to this story of doomed romance, clashing cultural, and dubious justice as only film can.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [The city of Hong Kong and John Simm] ensure that this eight-episode series filled with heavy-breathing conspirators, multiplying menaces and other reliable indicators of ordinariness instead builds to a sizzling life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Breslin and Hamill: Deadline Artists comes with a heavenly supply of gossip, a treasury of revered observations on life--mainly wisecracks--and a delectably detailed view of the larger world of print journalism in which its subjects thrived.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A thriller of sorts, the series also manages a fair amount of suspense and can claim one of the better car chases in recent memory. ... The skillful cast carries the series, though John Goodman is wasted as an idealistic lawyer in the field of human rights.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The superbly written first chapter signals the horror to come in haunting detail. ... This is a script determinedly dedicated to the slow reveal. But it also one alive with passion and a mordant wit. ... A subtle and affecting portrayal by Mr. Ali.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Like the prisoners in their new freedom, these final episodes tend to wander. Still there’s a lot to be said for the series as a whole. In particular, the parts set in the institution, the focus on daily existence in the place, the clamor, the tensions, the character of the guards, the favors available for a little bribery, all of it a sterling evocation of prison life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This masterwork from HBO isn’t the sort whose powers depend on the suspense of plot turns. Every chapter is a profoundly moving world unto itself--a stunning achievement whose every moment lives in all the ways that matter in drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Viscerally penetrating thriller, outstanding in its subtlety, its anxiety-making atmospherics, and not least its heart--the contribution of a sterling cast headed by Julia Roberts in the role of therapist Heidi Bergman--inhabits a world beyond political themes. ... Mr. Whigham’s performance as Carrasco is plain delectable. So is virtually all else about this series whose exceptional powers, including the power to terrify, derive from conversation not action.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Ms. Collette does actually bring a spark to this enterprise, but not enough for a fire that would offset the tedium that comes with this work that is, with its six episodes, hellishly long, as are most of the conversations about sex.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It isn’t often that the components of a thriller can be said to blend perfectly with fiery social commentary, but it is the case with this marvelous production, which is downright terrifying in its aura of criminal menace and positively seething on the status of women--two very different dramatic forces, but they complement one another somehow.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The opening chapter’s gripping first scene finds the local FBI unit confronting a terror bombing. ... There’s also a smoothly supercilious, white supremacist (a striking performance by Dallas Roberts) and references to an organization with a title evocative of a current battle cry: Make America Great Again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Relentlessly dark, occasionally exhausting and altogether gripping adaptation of Christie’s 1958 novel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It comes with immense relief, therefore, to discover after most of an hour the beginnings of a true biographical portrait, a kind that continues to grow in strength to the end. It’s a success largely abetted by an assortment of commentators, longtime friends of Williams--among them comedians like Billy Crystal, Eric Idle and Steve Martin--who provide telling observations.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This rollicking, sublimely written work of countless tones leaves no doubt that Thorpe was guilty of plotting obsessively to kill his once-adored younger lover, Norman Scott. ... Among its tones, the show manages a tender note or two for the character of Thorpe, which leads, in the end, to a convincingly complex portrait.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The film moves on two generations to another era, our own--and regrettably, for the most part, except for the luminous presence of Vanessa Redgrave, extraordinary as Flora, now grown old. ... [Her grandson's] a regular user of dating apps, but he’s just not a happy guy--which is, of course, the point of this final section, awash in sermonizing on the necessity of finding true love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its writing is the making of Succession, a 10-part romp not without its flaws--the soap-opera element is strong--but one without a dull moment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    No one expects in a 21st-century film version, an hour and a half in length, anything approaching the subtlety and character that went into Bradbury’s novel. Still one might have asked--of a film titled “Fahrenheit 451”--for more than a one-note rant.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    For all its wandering through hopeless plotlines like Rose’s endless adventures planning her wedding, an effort at inspired abandon that grows more ghastly by the minute--and there are a lot of those--The Split in time finds its footing as powerful drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Whether thanks to the absence of those phones or not, there’s no missing the ebullience that courses through this splendidly realized drama of ambition, of workplace ties that bind--that brings it roaring spectacularly to life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An extravaganza of exhausting time shifts and mind-numbing dialogue that can use all the sympathy it gets. When the drama comes vividly alive, as it does often enough, the subject is seldom art. It’s almost always Picasso (a seductive if also largely unknowable character in Antonio Banderas’s subtle portrayal) and the women who loved him: women he loved and needed in turn and in time betrayed and abandoned.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    To watch the film’s Margaret (a sublime Hayley Atwell), is to see in full detail, the character Forster envisioned. ... In four episodes of sterling drama, Howards End has been brought fully to life on the television screen. That is no small achievement.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Al Pacino’s Paterno is so convincing, and eerily lifelike it becomes necessary from time to time, to remember that this isn’t the actual coach. ... The film may offer no verdict about the coach but there’s plenty of another kind of judgment here, captured vividly in the recurrent images of football violence. More eloquent still are the pictures of the raging mobs rioting over the threats to Paterno’s status.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    In the final season of The Americans the Jenningses--the KGB spy couple dedicated to unremitting war against the U.S.--are at war with one another, and a bitter, masterfully dramatized war it is. ... It comes as no surprise that one of the greatest drama series in television history should come to its end as powerful as ever.

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