Dorothy Rabinowitz

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For 300 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dorothy Rabinowitz's Scores

Average review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Parade's End
Lowest review score: 10 Category 7: The End of the World: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 300
300 tv reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    “Intelligence” goes rollicking along, with much to commend it, chiefly its wit and energy—and unexpected little touches, among them the divine Noël Coward singing “There are bad times just around the corner” at the end of each episode. It doesn’t hurt, either, that its brief chapters are a liberating 30 minutes, commercials included.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The series would have profited handsomely from cutting. “Outcry” is, nevertheless, an immensely moving piece of history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An exceptionally compelling bilingual drama. ... A complex work gripping from start to finish thanks to stellar writing, impressive performances, and, not least, perhaps, the ambition that comes shining through.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Among the enchanting aspects of “Space Force”, and they’re countless, is its capacity to seem what it decidedly is not. ... Wit-drenched series. ... The series is rich in skilled performances, among them Jimmy O. Yang as the unshakably poised Dr. Chan Kaifang, who steals more than a few scenes, and Noah Emmerich as Gen. Kick Grabaston, Gen. Naird’s enemy. The highest accolades belong, of course, to the writers of this comedy of sparkling sophistication, chimpanzees included, and wit that runs deep.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There is no denying the drama of this instant plunge into temptation, to the accompaniment of an ominous musical soundtrack that never ends. There is no missing, either, the absence of developed characters (musculature aside)—a product of writing wholly lacking in ambition (the film is based on a novel by Kate O’Riordan). For all that, a stubbornly working engine drives this tale, thanks to which it becomes, in its own quietly suffocating way, drama that sustains suspense.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A blend of romance and mystery, borne up by delectable touches of soap opera, the series races along charged with suspense—excruciatingly so, sometimes—from the first of its six parts to the last. This is the gold in “Gold Digger,” and there’s a lot of it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An hour so evocative of the British during the Blitz, so rich in footage of Elizabeth’s parents, the king and queen, standing in the rubble with bombedout Londoners, that it seems, however often one has caught sight of them, that these scenes are all new, the crowds in them never seen before. ... This documentary, despite the title, finds much of its drama in Elizabeth’s mother and father, who by example embodied unstinting dedication to the war effort.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its a hash that’s satisfying. ... A fitting touch for this series, whose cutting portrait of the psychiatrists—their displays of professional jealousy and devotion to theory, their earnestly delivered scholarship on the special nature of female psychopathology—is the best drama going for this thriller.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It is thanks to its narrow, altogether gripping—if also frequently suffocating—clinical focus on the inner lives of its subjects that we come to know the Barber family of Massachusetts. ... The portrayal of this devoted couple is far from convincing. It’s a peculiarly weak aspect of this otherwise strong production.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The months at Windermere in the end prove their worth as evident in this film, impressively devoid of sentimentality, grim in its facts, and moving in its portrait of the determined effort to rescue these young lives
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There are parts of “World on Fire,” a 2019 work written for the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II, that aren’t equal to the whole, and some characters that don’t ring true, but their number is negligible. As is their impact on this extraordinarily affecting series, so clearly powered by its passion for the history it represents, and by a remarkable cast.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The color, settings and lavish social detail are mainly what distinguishes this enterprise—an adventure well worth an hour’s viewing, though its resolution is a bit cryptic, as sagas that belong to a category called “Amazing Stories” are wont to be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s difficult to think of any film that speaks to our moment as strikingly as this documentary does, a quality evident early on. ... [Scenes of men's] complaints about, for instance, the pain of having to listen regularly to a woman’s voice are in their hellish way priceless and not to be missed. The same goes for all four hours of this never less than mesmerizing film.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Richly inventive and also frequently appalling. ... Matters like this aside, along with the graphic torture scenes, there’s much that’s compelling about this buoyant and ambitious series, not least its detailed picture of the Nazi-hunting team pursuing leads.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Superbly layered drama. ... The action here is, like all the rest, set against spectacular landscapes, packed with blood-freezing encounters and virtuoso plot turns. In this 10-part series, every episode lives. No small achievement.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    For all its messaging and repetition, its time travel and related wandering, the series (created and written by Timothy Greenberg, directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris) maintains its compelling power from its hilarious beginning all the way—and it’s a long way—to its predictable end.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Ebullient. ... The result is a heady atmosphere of continuous action that’s invariably engrossing, even when the principle involved is something as simple as the rule that it’s wrong to steal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    “The Spy” is gripping drama. Its creators have a satisfying grasp of the truth that there’s little so terrifying as the clickety-clack of a hero-spy tapping out urgent intelligence messages in his lonely room as the enemy’s surveillance team drives around tracking the sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [Kirsten Dunst] sustains the series with a life-giving performance full of heart and, possibly more important, steel. ... For all its one-note darkness, the episodes move along compellingly, thanks in good part to sequences involving evidence-gathering against Obie led by a daring and determined Krystal along with a cocaine-sniffing TV reporter. Then there’s the complex, if also slightly repellant romantic connection that grows between Krystal and the youthful Cody (a jewel of a performance by Théodore Pellerin).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s clear from the outset of this dazzling chronicle set in Israel that there’s not going to be any softening of its extraordinary tension, its scenes of anguished suffering, its furiously eloquent debates on justice and loyalty, its epic crowd scenes. ... A work of distinguished writing, fearless in its sophistication, unfailing in its powers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    "Sweetbitter" returns for a second season Sunday on Starz, powered, like its first, with unfailing wit, superbly conceived characters, and confidence in its own strength. That last thoroughly justified essential comes shining through every scene of this series.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It yields no revelatory light to speak of on its subject.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Unalloyed caricature of a political biography. ... Some filmmaker may one day undertake the story of Roger Ailes, Fox News, the rise of the modern Republican Party and the presidency of Donald Trump and make it a worthy enterprise. Something that can’t be said of this series, which has all the nuance of a long rap sheet plus indictment in its predictability, its driving effort to establish its case—and which, like those tummlers of old, can leave an audience longing for the end of the act.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A spectacularly ambitious enterprise of unfailing power, rich in all the ways that matter in drama, in writing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [A] smashing tale alive with heart and wit.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The series traces, in vivid detail, the struggle to aid black progress in this period and its powerful opposition. ... A rich four hours, including the birth and purpose of the Ku Klux Klan, the way in which black Americans responded, and without anything resembling a dull moment.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There’s nothing Michelle Williams can do, no lines written for her to say, that can dim the luster of her performance in this series, which owes everything to her and to Sam Rockwell, and to the exhilarating, if all too brief, musical numbers.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The HBO version’s ambitious, complex and deeply detailed narrative delivers dimension to this story of doomed romance, clashing cultural, and dubious justice as only film can.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [The city of Hong Kong and John Simm] ensure that this eight-episode series filled with heavy-breathing conspirators, multiplying menaces and other reliable indicators of ordinariness instead builds to a sizzling life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Breslin and Hamill: Deadline Artists comes with a heavenly supply of gossip, a treasury of revered observations on life--mainly wisecracks--and a delectably detailed view of the larger world of print journalism in which its subjects thrived.

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