Dorothy Rabinowitz

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For 323 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 71% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dorothy Rabinowitz's Scores

Average review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Vinyl: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Prime Suspect: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 323
323 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s hard not to look at this army of exquisite creatures striding smartly around—looking all the more impressive against the stunning beach background—without suspecting they’re off to some black-tie celebration. They’re not, of course—the celebration is in the minds of viewers following this enchanting sight, this filmed gift in eight parts narrated by Patton Oswalt.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    In this highly engaging series, a riot of creatures great and small competing for the attention of the show’s star, who is, naturally enough, the group’s therapist. She’s a standard poodle (expertly voiced by Lisa Kudrow).
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its somewhat uneven storytelling aside, “The Drowning” emerges as a potent thriller, largely thanks to a stellar cast.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It takes just a single glance at the opening scene—a member of the orca family pivoting about in the ocean—to feel you’ve been transported to paradise. ... Spectacular series. ... The show’s impact has, needless to say, everything to do with Brian Skerry’s impossibly intimate photography of these creatures.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Sterling drama. ... A seven-part series whose powers derive as much from its enthralling focus on that town and its society as from the unsteady life and career of its heroine, known simply as Mare, a police detective born and raised there. Kate Winslet’s eloquent command of the role is obvious from the outset. ... It’s a testament to the writing (Brad Ingelsby wrote the script) that no moment in this saga ever feels even remotely unreal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [Tahar Rahim] brings a breathtaking subtlety to the part of Sobhraj. ... It takes time, admittedly, until the full details of the master plan Sobhraj followed sink in.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There’s a power in this work that has nothing to do with its characters, a kind that makes itself felt wordlessly—namely, the unyielding grip of fear. .
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    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A lively work, buried in plot twists, improved by ferocious action sequences, and flat-out saved by Mr. Simm.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    [Answers] emerge with a satisfying subtlety in “Beartown”—for all its familiarity, a riveting tale.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The most compelling aspect of the series is the hard light it shines on the cost of betrayal and infidelity, particularly to children like those in Mia’s family, who watch in pain and anger as the man they looked on as a father figure has his barely concealed fling with Soon-Yi, whom he would later marry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    All the drama of this sharply written new tale is focused devotedly on Clarice, now portrayed with heart and intelligence by Rebecca Breeds.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    In the dark of our winter, with turbulence in the air and the American military needed to guard the nation’s government buildings, a visit to Réunion feels like a tonic in six episodes. ... The atmosphere is festive, the conversation lively, including those between feuding relatives. There is, above all, the look of those trees, those skies and everything else in this faraway place.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A gripping tale of ambition, struggles for success and numerous other kinds of psychological hunger.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The script shines with life, its drama far from predictable, it’s pleasures profound.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its portrait of an embattled Australian Senate, of the prime minister’s own battle for survival, all of it drama borne aloft by the electric rage that courses through the dialogue and seems never to dim.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There is, even so, a sprightliness to this lurid tale, though a kind that goes dead, much like a stalled engine. ... The show’s tone is at its best in the real-world snappy exchanges between Cassie and her loyal if confused band of fellow flight attendants who notice her air of disconnectedness—and liveliest in her talks with her lawyer friend.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Despite periodic awkwardness, Mr. Hamburg’s film succeeds in sustaining the emotional weight of this enterprise—his direct and obvious effort to discover who in the family could have murdered his mother. ... The truth—evident from the outset of this series—is that the mystery of the killing will not be solved, that there will never be, in its affecting chapters, the moment of revelation that everyone carried along by such a drama is desperate to see.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A blistering four-part assessment of the Reagan White House years (1981-89) enlivened by nonstop denunciation of the 40th president’s policies and beliefs.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A thriller of sorts—there are plenty of dark forces here—with a strong sitcom sensibility, “The Trouble With Maggie Cole” is a rollicking drama that shines with life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Enthralling. ... We’ve seen this character before, a cliché of sorts, but as portrayed by Imelda Staunton this Mary is unforgettable—utterly convincing. ... Richly compelling narrative of Vivien, her children, and the ever-present Mary—not to mention Vivien’s love affair and her children’s steely resistance to the idea of their mother marrying the man.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A two-part documentary of searing power on more than a few counts, including its wealth of merciless facts. ... The forces that once set about determining the outcome of an American election know no endings—they are alive and well. That recognition is the burning heart of this documentary so affecting in its passion and extraordinary in its conception.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Improbable though it is as a spy story, “Tehran” maintains its suspense throughout, possibly because it’s about more than spying. It’s a tale that incorporates the drama of lost cultures and identities. ... A satisfying ride.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The sagas of the families left behind—largely, family life sociology with a touch of soap opera—are, at least, watchable and sometimes better than that. They can’t, however, compare with the irresistible drama of life on the spaceship. ... These 10 hours spent hurtling toward Mars hold the promise of rich entertainment.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    “Intelligence” goes rollicking along, with much to commend it, chiefly its wit and energy—and unexpected little touches, among them the divine Noël Coward singing “There are bad times just around the corner” at the end of each episode. It doesn’t hurt, either, that its brief chapters are a liberating 30 minutes, commercials included.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The series would have profited handsomely from cutting. “Outcry” is, nevertheless, an immensely moving piece of history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An exceptionally compelling bilingual drama. ... A complex work gripping from start to finish thanks to stellar writing, impressive performances, and, not least, perhaps, the ambition that comes shining through.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Among the enchanting aspects of “Space Force”, and they’re countless, is its capacity to seem what it decidedly is not. ... Wit-drenched series. ... The series is rich in skilled performances, among them Jimmy O. Yang as the unshakably poised Dr. Chan Kaifang, who steals more than a few scenes, and Noah Emmerich as Gen. Kick Grabaston, Gen. Naird’s enemy. The highest accolades belong, of course, to the writers of this comedy of sparkling sophistication, chimpanzees included, and wit that runs deep.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There is no denying the drama of this instant plunge into temptation, to the accompaniment of an ominous musical soundtrack that never ends. There is no missing, either, the absence of developed characters (musculature aside)—a product of writing wholly lacking in ambition (the film is based on a novel by Kate O’Riordan). For all that, a stubbornly working engine drives this tale, thanks to which it becomes, in its own quietly suffocating way, drama that sustains suspense.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A blend of romance and mystery, borne up by delectable touches of soap opera, the series races along charged with suspense—excruciatingly so, sometimes—from the first of its six parts to the last. This is the gold in “Gold Digger,” and there’s a lot of it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An hour so evocative of the British during the Blitz, so rich in footage of Elizabeth’s parents, the king and queen, standing in the rubble with bombedout Londoners, that it seems, however often one has caught sight of them, that these scenes are all new, the crowds in them never seen before. ... This documentary, despite the title, finds much of its drama in Elizabeth’s mother and father, who by example embodied unstinting dedication to the war effort.

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