For 70 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ed Frankl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 A War
Lowest review score: 20 Fifty Shades of Grey
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 47 out of 70
  2. Negative: 3 out of 70
70 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    For all its social-realist tendencies, A Chiara is told in a wonderfully fluid and poetic fashion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    Cow
    Yet despite a lo-fi, handheld-camera cragginess, it still has something of the lyricism that marks so much of her work, going back to the Oscar-winning short Wasp.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Ed Frankl
    Folman is best in the family-entertainment mode when he’s breathing visual life into Anne’s flights of imagination.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Ed Frankl
    Xavier Beauvois has made a film that contemplates trauma of one’s own making, a perceptive work that grapples with guilt and grief.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    It would be churlish not to report that there are some laughs and profound moments to be discovered here.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Ed Frankl
    Not since A Short Film About Killing has a filmmaker produced such a thrilling case against capital punishment, an enraging, enthralling, enduring testament to the oppressed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    It’s a film that carries emotional power more in its moments of natural reflexiveness than the weepie genre’s more conventional emotional beats, anchored by two focused lead performances that thankfully don’t succumb to melodrama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    This is Jóhannsson’s first and last film, and its hard not to recognize that this is a director who arrived fully formed as a visual artist. His dreamy combination of sound and images, the editing and pacing, and his use of Sturla Brandth Grøvlen’s grainy 16mm cinematography combine with strange potency.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    All the Dead Ones is an accomplished film by directing duo Caetano Gotardo and Marco Dutra, rich in the nation’s poetry and music, daring in highlighting women’s voices while commenting on Brazil’s history of inequality of wealth, class, and race.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Ed Frankl
    Sorry We Missed You is, simply, one of his best films that links the personal and the political.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Ed Frankl
    The final third, especially, is by-the-numbers plotting. It’s a pity, as the film starts off promising some interesting overarching themes, especially Sibyl’s underhand ethics of mining her psychological examinations for fiction. As a metaphor for artistic invention, it’s an interesting, but unsuccessful one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    This is a straightforward coming-of-age story from France, a country for whom this is almost a national cliché, but elevated by a key eye for gender roles of its protagonists and an up-to-date message for a teenage generation growing up in a #MeToo world.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Ed Frankl
    A sterile arthouse drama that rather muddles its conceit. ... Hausner and co-writer Géraldine Bajard never really get to grips with the potential for psychological terror at the center of what remains a genuinely intriguing premise.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Ed Frankl
    This is an especially personal work, anchored by the director’s on-off muse Antonio Banderas in perhaps his greatest performance and sweeps through the Spanish maestro’s recurrent themes: high melodrama and kitsch comedy, piety and carnal lust, sex and death, human pain and transcendent glory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    As an exercise in depicting the disjointed link between national and personal identity, Synonyms is dazzling. As a portrait of displacement in a world becoming both more globalized and more nationalistic, it is a testament.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    This is a film that stages itself in non-linear narratives, in severe, clinical long takes, in metaphorical observations, and even extended sequences of Shakespearean re-enactment–a film whose aesthetics may be intensely controlled and yet whose narrative is sprawling with meanings and readings.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Ed Frankl
    Director Adler has made a very talky film, full of interior scenes and far flung from the hard-edged spy thrillers of Bond or Bourne.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Ed Frankl
    Akin has made the true story of a repulsive, grotesque serial killer into a repulsive, grotesque movie, a calamitous misfire for a critical darling of recent German cinema.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ed Frankl
    Here is a film littered with off-piste humor and featuring a memorable, warm-hearted ending that argues being open to serendipitous new experiences beats comforting certainties in life.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    Zhao’s combination of the visual palette of Terrence Malick, the social backbone of Kelly Reichardt, and the spontaneity of John Cassavetes creates cinema verité in the American plains.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    Garrel has the touch of a wiser man not taking judgment on his characters’ youthful foibles, where setbacks are to be embraced and learned from rather than experiences discarded from memory.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    This is a strangely believable dystopia, and all the more brilliant for it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    There’s much to interest the Lynch fan here, but it also might be an unparalleled assessment of the artistic learning of a great American filmmaker.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Ed Frankl
    Set in the picturesque Portuguese city of the title, the film demonstrates first-time fiction director Gabe Klinger’s eye for visual storytelling, but his script, co-written by Larry Gross, feels undeveloped for anything further than glib, Instagram-like testaments to cherished moments in time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    It’s a spiritual, ambiguously plotted journey through the Atlas Mountains, and those willing to give in to its mystical embrace and gorgeous visuals should find it a sensual, engrossing watch.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    This is a formally complex work, too long perhaps and occasionally opaque in its meaning, but a daring ride to those wanting to glimpse the best of African cinema.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Ed Frankl
    While Kateb is a fine presence, Colmar (a co-writer of the far superior Of Gods and Men) directs with none of his protagonist’s thrilling pizazz, and his and Salatko’s script plods without any of jazz’s syncopated rhythms
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Ed Frankl
    Timely issues of transgender rights both in Latin and North America help make A Fantastic Woman a bolder, brasher film, fiery in comparison with Gloria’s relatively tenderness, but anchored once more by a stellar central performance
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Ed Frankl
    It’s a generational drama anchored by three great performances, but it feels rather distinctly average — and it’s hard to make Isabelle Huppert look average.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Ed Frankl
    Boyle’s verve as a director means there’s still plenty of vibrant imagery, alongside a script that, although lacking any of the electricity of the original’s state-of-the-nation wisecracks (“Scotland is a nation colonized by wankers”), is funny and disarmingly melancholic.

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