Elizabeth Weitzman

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For 2,352 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Reprise
Lowest review score: 0 Breaking Point
Score distribution:
2352 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It’s an enjoyable ride with intermittently compelling moments, particularly when Buttigieg struggles to find the balance between innate personality, intellectual morality, and professional practicality. But the film simply doesn’t dig deep enough.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Presumably, Sudeikis took this job to prove his dramatic skills, and he does deserve credit for achieving that goal. What he’s never able to generate, though, is a compelling case for the movie itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    “Becoming Cousteau” could have used a little more focus on his earthly experiences.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The smooth professionalism of so many outstanding participants can’t help but elevate a very ordinary film a little bit higher. Despite the best efforts of both McCarthy and O’Dowd, though, there’s never a moment where it truly takes flight.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    DaCosta uses a range of thoughtfully considered media to shape their already-sharp script; the film’s violence is equally startling whether it’s depicted graphically and up-close, or through old-fashioned shadow puppets and oral traditions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even when the movie stumbles, Hudson’s bravura performance — and those extraordinary songs — steady its soul.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 45 Elizabeth Weitzman
    When a movie doesn’t hold up to introspection as a whole, it’s best to examine its parts. And some of those are admirable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A fascinating deconstruction of history, culture, and identity, No Ordinary Man raises so many crucial questions — and answers them so thoughtfully — that it moves beyond entertainment into the realm of essential text. It belongs, equally, in theaters, streaming queues, and classrooms.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Overall, the whole project feels weirdly empty and off-puttingly self-congratulatory, as though the very idea of turning women into action heroes is revolutionary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    There are ominously edited portents and a score that starts at fever pitch and rarely pulls back. But the frayed strands of the horror plot feel hastily woven together, and underwhelming when all is revealed.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    In some ways, Soni has the hardest job here: He’s got to make the rigidly old-fashioned, obsessively uptight Ravi likable enough that we want to see him end up with an independent woman. But Viswanathan has some hurdles too, and they wind up being tougher to overcome.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Neville is deeply respectful — “Roadrunner” is an unabashed tribute to its subject — but the filmmaker doesn’t occlude the chef’s dark side.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Wahlberg and Ejiofor muster enough charisma to keep us watching, and Jason Mantzoukas cuts through the generic feel with some much-appreciated weirdness as the Artisan.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Euros Lyn’s heartwarming Dream Horse doesn’t rewrite the genre, but it’s feel-good filmmaking of the sort many may be inclined to seek out at the moment. Although overly familiar and openly sentimental, it’s also an easy watch that’s gently appealing.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A B-movie effort from an A-list production team, Joe Wright’s The Woman in the Window buckles beneath its aspirations almost immediately.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The impact of the last-act reveal also speaks to the considerable strength of the filmmakers, including not just Lucks but his gifted co-writer Natalie Medlock. Because although the movie concerns itself with love and sexuality, its true subjects are vulnerability, trust and self-knowledge.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Elizabeth Weitzman
    R#J
    It’s tough to get invested in a romance between two people more interested in likes than love.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It would be nice to see Wright work from a stronger script next time, but she rises above the limitations admirably.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ascher leaves us pondering the costs of dissociation, but also its seductive appeal. Is it really that outlandish to look around occasionally, and wonder at the surreality of it all?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    What Palmer is, in every sense of the word, is decent. It’s familiar, and predictable, and a little bit hokey. But it’s also genuinely moving and surprisingly memorable, thanks to its two leads.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Jeffrey McHale’s feature debut, the Showgirls appreciation documentary “You Don’t Nomi,” works awfully hard to justify both its subject and its mission. But if you instantly appreciated the cleverness of its title, you’ll enjoy commiserating with fellow travelers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film is structured so we come away with two competing, and yet complementary, impressions. First, that our political system has become infected with a rampant and deadly corruption that has spread out of control. And second, that there is a communal cure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Marks and Liberato are a delight, equally appealing on their own and total #FriendshipGoals together. The two are close in real life and the strength of their chemistry is, ultimately, what makes the movie so special.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Indeed, this year’s Antiquarian Book Fair is celebrating its 60th anniversary at the Armory right now. And after seeing “The Booksellers,” you’ll be a lot more likely to think about how to get there, and maybe a little less inclined to place that next easy order on Amazon.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Reichardt and her outstanding team ensure that we are fully invested in her striving heroes, and equally anxious for their promising young country, as well.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The movie’s most notable asset is the way it resists sketching any of its main characters with a single, easy-to-grasp definition.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you hired an independent filmmaker to create a perfume ad, and then turned that ad into a full-length movie, you’d probably get something that looks a lot like Dimitri de Clercq’s directorial debut, “You Go to My Head.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The real problem is that no one involved seems to realize that their heroine is, in fact, an antiheroine. Had the movie gone all-in on Peg’s amorality, we might have had a more interesting project.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though we leave Earth feeling overwhelmed, we’re also more aware than ever that he’s only shown us the tiniest fraction of our impact.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    As both writer and director, Cronenberg focuses so intently on the surface that he neglects to include enough substance.

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