Elizabeth Weitzman

Select another critic »
For 2,398 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Elizabeth Weitzman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 All Is Lost
Lowest review score: 0 I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell
Score distribution:
2398 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 35 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Even Downs, so appealing on Nickelodeon’s “Henry Danger,” can’t fight the forces of this soulless script (which was based on a potentially promising story idea by Wenonah Wilms).
    • tbd Metascore
    • 35 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Too much of Dear Zoe, though, feels factory-designed to engineer emotion rather than aiming to earn it organically.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 35 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Bajestani is believably repellent as someone whose split lives as an obsessive loner and respected family man are disturbingly concordant. And Nadim Carlsen’s gritty camerawork pushes the film’s sense of grim social realism further still, providing a viscerally authentic horror. Abbasi doesn’t seem to realize, though, that he’s creating much of that horror himself.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you’ve ever watched a classic movie and wondered why no one else seems uncomfortable with its portrayal of female characters, you’ll want to see “Brainwashed” as soon as possible. And if you haven’t — well, that may be all the more reason to seek it out.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Battleground does serve as an excellent primer on the political and practical positions of both sides. But the biggest takeaway of this disconcerting documentary may come from pro-choice activist Sam Blakely, who insists that “we have to stop playing defense, and start playing offense.” Hope, it turns out, is no kind of strategy at all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Timoner uses a stripped-down, totally straightforward method. She sets up a camera in her parent’s living room, where her father is resting in a hospital bed and her mother is silently worrying on the couch. And then she begins counting down the days.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Connolly has turned Tim Winton’s 1997 novella into his own environmental cri de coeur . . . and while the specifics can get a bit clunky, his passion drives our interest all the way to the end.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Given that Kalderon juggles as many tones as Erez has moods, it’s tough to imagine how he could possibly wrap them all up. And yet he brings his hero, and all of us now cheering him on from the stands, to the perfect conclusion. Unveiling one of the best finales of the year, he turns his ambivalent swimmer into a superstar.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 45 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Unlike its levitating heroine, it never really gets off the ground.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    It is rare to find a film that reflects its subject so insightfully, in both an artistic and thematic sense.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately, though, it all comes down to Duhamel. For a brief, heady moment, the real Galvan had all of Canada intrigued by his exploits. But the greatest coup of all is that his legacy will now forever be defined by Bandit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The scale in which Fukada works — as both writer and director — is so deliberately intimate that immense experiences feel microcosmic, while tiny moments make a huge impact.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If you set out to combine the worst parts of Hallmark holiday movies with the worst parts of frenetic ‘90s rom-coms, you’d probably wind up with something a lot like About Fate. The women are nuts, the men are clueless and the production is so cheap you could pass the time spotting every mistake no one bothered to fix.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Zemeckis and co-writer Chris Weitz do make some attempt to dust off the concept, but the modernized moments further undermine their efforts. When they add empathy, the story loses its soul. And when they jam in easy updates, it just highlights how out of touch the rest of the script feels.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We learn in the documentary Loving Highsmith that the author herself knew plenty about the duality that defined so many of her characters.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The truth is that even at 71 minutes much of this film feels padded, as though Stigter couldn’t let go of the subject but also wasn’t sure how to expand it further. Because Kurtz’s concept is so moving, however, the film retains much of the power he brought to his book.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Elizabeth Weitzman
    For all its telling — and showing — of sex, Bloom Up never really gets going until its final few minutes. And that late-stage twist occurs during the rare scene in which everyone is fully clothed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Through copious clips of studio work and bittersweet interviews with Vinton, his former colleagues, and his family members, we get a sense of both his strengths and weaknesses.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The film’s best scenes are, in a way, the flip side to its weaker ones: the closeness between Castro and her subjects lessens their objectivity but strengthens their intimacy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Though the religious component is written broadly, the impact is hardly more surreal than many elements of 21st-century reality.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    We can, thanks to movies like this one, continue to bear witness. But we will never truly know the reality he tries so hard to unearth, and that remains our burden to hold.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A slow burn that never quite bursts into flame, Both Sides of the Blade is likely to appeal most to those who are already fans of director Claire Denis. That said, would anyone turn down the opportunity to spend a couple of hours with her luminous leading lady, Juliette Binoche?
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    A listless thriller that can’t find its footing, Abandoned does occasionally rouse itself enough to suggest a better movie that never comes to pass.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    If the children feel like symbols — sweet and touching, but not quite real — the adults provide a profusion of reality.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 55 Elizabeth Weitzman
    The Phantom of the Open tries so hard to be a winking commentary on British heartwarmers about lovable outsiders. And its efforts are, as often as not, entertaining. But after a while, it becomes clear that what it wants more than anything is to be embraced as a crowd-pleasing comedy itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 65 Elizabeth Weitzman
    To call it a difficult watch would be an understatement; it often feels, in its stark honesty, like a horror film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Zax’s gentle, fly-on-the-wall perspective keeps us primarily in the present, reminding us that all we need is right there inside the shop.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Too many heartwarming comedies, especially those with mature leads, eventually expose themselves as cynical contrivances. The same could be said for some of the based-in-truth dramas that have started to feel inexorably churned out. In its affable sincerity, The Duke is both their opposite and their antidote, a feel-good entertainment for feel-bad times.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 45 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Ultimately the movie asks a lot of us, while simultaneously withholding too much. The concept remains compelling, but the execution both figuratively and literally falls flat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Elizabeth Weitzman
    Why, given all its potential, wasn’t the bar set higher? That, alas, remains the most noteworthy mystery of all.

Top Trailers