For 135 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Eric Hynes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Little Fugitive (re-release)
Lowest review score: 20 The Internship
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 135
  2. Negative: 15 out of 135
135 movie reviews
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    Even by low standards, Grudge Match is astonishingly undercooked.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Mike Eley’s gorgeously saturated cinematography helps elevate the boys’ struggle into the realm of the heroic, but it’s the two young stars — one a whirlwind and the other a quiet protector — who make this only-slightly tall tale into something towering.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    The film ultimately plays less like an experiment than a demonstration of a tinkerer’s ingenuity. Tim’s finished Vermeer may resemble the real thing, but Tim’s Vermeer never tackles the true mystery of why the latter is actually incomparable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    From the sun’s surface to the deep earth, Hawaiian volcanoes to Detroit’s decay, Mettler explores the different ways that we experience and define time, using his own documentary as a mind-bending demonstration of its mutability.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Though it’s culled from 600 hours of footage, Medora feels thin in terms of memorable imagery, and bounces a little too hastily between scenes. But it’s utterly impossible not to pull for these boys, or for a film that sees them as complex individuals rather than sociological evidence.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Jiro’s genius is godlike, but his personality is nonexistent; time is too-briskly spanned, then ground into blow-by-blow melodrama.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Rote ageist jokes abound (“Do you guys have drugs?” asks a bachelorette; “Does Lipitor count?” responds Kline), but they come with an inclusive, self-deprecating spirit that grows more endearing over the duration.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    There’s a heart here, but with all the superficial noise, it’s hard to hear it beating.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Eric Hynes
    The film strives to cinematically reanimate that shabby underground lair; instead, it proves to be the most bastardized souvenir bauble of all.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    An adaptation of a short story from David Sedaris’s best-selling Naked collection, C.O.G. (short for “Child of God”) struggles from the outset to retain the snap of the NPR favorite’s hyperbolic humor while also grounding it in authenticity—a tonal disconnect that nonetheless serves to destabilize a potentially predictable coming-of-age tale.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Working from a script by playwright Darci Picoult, Dosunmu fashions a tale that’s realistic, melodramatic and culturally specific (we spend as much time ogling colorfully patterned dresses as we do admiring Gurira’s endlessly expressive face), yet unmistakably archetypal.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    Given only hints of personalities and the thinnest strands of stories, we’re left with a hum of tinny snippets instead of anything that resembles the glorious noise of people putting on show after show after show.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Eric Hynes
    This drama is as listless and self-regarding as its protagonist, flitting among underdeveloped characters and subplots and indulging in rote emo shots by the pool, yet never figuring out how to dive into the deep end.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    It’s a film defined by momentum, by the spectacle of an unformed young man rapidly becoming someone.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    he wild-eyed Celedón and stealthily empathetic Saavedra introduce a farcical element to this otherwise mournful milieu, but the tonal clashes yield something genuinely cathartic, if also ultimately irresolvable.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    It’s a human-size tragedy, one that shows how deadening it can be to remain subject to those who give us life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    While veteran director Fernando Trueba (Belle Epoque) and writer Jean-Claude Carrière don’t bring much novelty to the May-December/muse-artist/naked-clothed cliché, they do imbue the material with genuine feeling—exploring the melancholy of waning days and a defiantly naive belief in artistic transcendence.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    The extreme variance of style and scrutability makes for wildly disorienting viewing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    How the geriatric ensemble dramedy became the last bastion of British cinema is a bit of a riddle, but like Cadbury Creme Eggs and Manchester soul, it doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Eric Hynes
    A movie sorely bereft of ideas, laughs and justification for the comic duo’s undifferentiating self-regard.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    What elevates the film is a pervasive, palpable sense of loss — between lover and beloved, young and old, stage and screen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Though its blanketed voiceover narration can be too on-the-nose—it’s a metaphor, we get it—the film packs a psychic punch, thanks to Gedeck’s spectrally wearied face.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    Eager to please and easy on the eyes, The Kings of Summer sails right down the middle, safely tacking between sitcom setups and grandiose MGMT-scored montages without forming its own distinctive feel.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Eric Hynes
    Plays like a gothic prequel to David Cronenberg's "A Dangerous Method," one in which human flesh is viewed as both horrific and erotic terrain.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    Eckhart’s status as the most likable too-handsome man this side of Chris Isaak will endure long after this film is erased from memory — which starts immediately.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Cassavetes adopts a grammar that occasionally slides into parody but mostly comes across as committed style. Kiss of the Damned contributes little new to the genre save a taste for alluringly tactile sex scenes and an avoidance of gore.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Eric Hynes
    Cloyingly crude and dispiritingly typical ensemble Hollywood farce.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    A miniseries, which the BBC once planned, might have worked. In this form, Midnight’s Children has the paradoxical misfortune of being both too rushed and too wearingly long.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Eric Hynes
    Characters seem less entrapped by their desires than by plot necessities — a fact that’s not redeemed by Ozon’s winking self-awareness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Eric Hynes
    Loach coaxes an endearingly poised performance out of nonprofessional Brannigan, and largely sells these scuffling characters as neither hopeless nor heroic—just terribly human.

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