For 46 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Fred Camper's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Sun
Lowest review score: 20 The Oil Factor: Behind the War on Terror
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 46
  2. Negative: 3 out of 46
46 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Fred Camper
    His first feature in 21 years, this is also Monte Hellman's finest work, a hall-of-mirrors masterpiece about moviemaking with diversions more complex, and more enticing, than in the director's previous efforts (Ride in the Whirlwind, Two-Lane Blacktop).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    The film does offer a good deal of engaging dark humor.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Shafer (himself a former Playgirl centerfold) never quite manages the incisive social critique his story seems to require.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Boyd brings no new insights to this drama of men in a confined space, a situation that's been the basis for many powerful war films.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Despite some amateurish moments, Pulido displays genuine visual intelligence, using repeated static angles to emphasize the blandness of the family's anonymous tract house and moving with the characters as they try to individualize themselves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    Misses a chance to use the Manhattan setting to add to his protagonist's displacement, instead treating the city as a bland backdrop.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Stylish color schemes make this pleasing to look at, though the uneven narrative is both a minus and a plus--in one of the best scenes, beggars do an impromptu celebratory dance in the salon.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Fred Camper
    De Niro sinks this crime drama with his vacant, inattentive performance as an affectionally challenged homicide detective.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    The camera goes limp during the climactic emotional blowout--unimaginative and static compositions leave the characters yelling at each other in a vacuum.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    Paid in Full isn't a complete success; still, it moves beyond many cliches to create an honest portrait of several Harlem drug kingpins on their way up and inevitably down.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    Doesn't add up to much more than a series of pretty pictures, and Goldsworthy's gnomic statements about the "energy" he perceives in "the plants and the land" are never fully explored.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Fred Camper
    Utterly fresh and beguiling.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    The fragmented compositions isolate the characters, trapping them in walled-off worlds -- which makes the brief kiss between Otomo and the grandmother all the more touching.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    Understated but affecting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Fred Camper
    Kar Kar's singing is wonderfully expressive, and an improvised song to his wife at her grave site demonstrates the emotional wellspring of his music.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    An engaged and knowing look at the underground world of improvised rap, concentrating on artists less interested in commercial success and cutting records than in the "spontaneous right now" of "nonconceptual rhyme."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    A moving evocation of longing unfulfilled.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Fred Camper
    The obviously authentic love these couples shared should settle the question for all but bigots.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Director Chad Friedrichs works around Jandek's never having revealed his identity by interpolating shots of the PO box and rocks on the beach with the talking heads of fans, critics, and journalists, and lots of Jandek's wistful, haunting music.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    The film's relaxed pace, unassuming tone, and respect for its characters all recall the films of Abbas Kiarostami, who provided the story idea, but director Ali Reza Raisian adds a slightly more dramatic and emotional edge.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    Fedja van Huet gives a fascinating performance as two very different twin brothers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    Julie-Marie Parmentier is fetching as the vulnerable younger sister, and the duo generate considerable erotic tension; unfortunately Denis' detached and indifferent camera never gets inside the story, its characters, or its milieu.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Fred Camper
    Friendship is portrayed here in its finest form.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    The most telling moments in this 2003 video documentary aren't the statements of the neo-Nazis, a tiny minority who get way too much screen time, but the lies and bigotries of the ordinary citizens.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    I'm no boxing fan, but there's something admirable about fighter Johar Abu Lashin's love of his sport, chronicled in Duki Dror's tautly constructed 2002 documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Fred Camper
    Engrossing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    Ken Hanes's witty script shows its origins in his stage play, with the repartee often a bit too thick and fast for the screen.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Fred Camper
    Directors Gerard Ungerman and Audrey Brohy don't provide much analysis, instead telling the familiar stories of the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Fred Camper
    While not particularly cohesive, this 2002 film has some nice moments of comedy and father-son poignancy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Fred Camper
    Filmmakers Garrett Scott and Ian Olds offer a damning chronicle of failure and chaos.

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