For 786 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Glenn Garvin's Scores

Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Morning Show: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Knight Rider: Season 1
Score distribution:
786 tv reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 65 Glenn Garvin
    The End, an Australian-made series that aired last year elsewhere in the English-speaking world, is sometimes grimly funny, but often just grim.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Garvin
    If you can't find something in here to enjoy, you're just not trying very hard.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Garvin
    Oh, by the way, the Devil keeps an autographed photo of Justin Bieber in his office. Go ahead, tell me you're surprised.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Garvin
    It's a ghoulishly brutal, stunningly creative, and utterly Pyrrhic send-up of blue-collar domestic sitcoms, way too effective to be entertaining.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Garvin
    The Republic of Sarah is the most deliriously goofy TV political mashup since a soon-to-be-vanished Brit satellite channel aired a sitcom called Heil, Honey, I'm Home! about you-know-who.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Glenn Garvin
    The show's concept—that in a mobile America where nobody stays long in the same ZIP code, particularly in their 20s, your family is your friends—still resonates.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 35 Glenn Garvin
    Adapted exclusively by King from his own 2006 novel, Lisey's Story is a mess in almost every conceivable way. It's drawn from a leaden and forgettable novel, and King's ponderous attempt at a screenplay has done nothing to improve it. Neither has Chilean director Pablo Larrain's painfully arty translation of the written word into video. And while Lisey's Story is loaded with female star power—Julianne Moore, Jennifer Jason Leigh and Joan Allen play sisters—King and Larrain have given them little to do except look head-bangingly anguished or (in Allen's case) catatonic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Garvin
    Watching McGregor spew this exquisite venom like a deranged rattlesnake is entertaining enough, and he gets great support from the rest of the cast—particularly the amazing Krysta Rodriguez (Smash), who captures the manic energy of early Halston advocate Liza Minnelli as if she were born into it. But most of the credit has to producer Murphy, who has an unparalleled ability to carve compelling narratives out of tangled, throbbing messes of characters and subplots.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Glenn Garvin
    The Kings simply seem incapable of writing anything unintelligent, and The Bite is no exception. When it's not scaring you—and it uses the empty spaces and telephone confinement of pandemic America to spectacular advantage in doing that—it's crippling you with laughter.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 20 Glenn Garvin
    Awful...A sci-fi fantasy vision of slavery and race relations, the TV version of The Underground Railroad is an incoherent mess of artistic pretension, full of scenes that are not under-lit but un-lit, nonsensical soliloquys with neither symbolic nor literal value (why would a slave recite lines from Gulliver's Travels to a young woman just beaten nearly to death by the plantation owner?) and surreal flashbacks that only further trash what is a very tentative narrative.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Garvin
    There are plenty of intriguing subplots and red herrings in Too Close, but what drives the engine is the full-speed collision of two cracked psyches, expertly played.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Garvin
    The show can suffer wild mood swings not just week to week but hour to hour. [12 July 2006, p.E3]
    • Miami Herald
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Glenn Garvin
    For all Covenant's effectiveness at depicting the insane frustration of black life in America in 1950, it still has multiple failings as a drama, particularly on the supernatural side of story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Glenn Garvin
    Though the Via Mala allusion is clever, the better stylistic reference for Spy City would be the early novels of John le Carré and the films based on the themes: bitter, cynical accounts of how intelligence agencies go off the rails and wage private little wars among themselves, fraught with collateral damage, using the Cold War as an excuse to settle old scores even if they scuttle the supposed larger issues.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Glenn Garvin
    Leaving aside King's peculiar nostalgia for the Middle Ages, the two-hour premiere of Kingdom Hospital, though a little long on weird affectations and a little short on story line, establishes an appropriately spooky atmosphere at the hospital and deftly sketches its main characters. [3 March 2004, p.4E]
    • Miami Herald
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Garvin
    Overall, the show—or at least its pilot episode, the only one The CW made available—manages the extraordinary feat of appealing to young genre fans as well striking a chord with their parents, even those still wondering if modern technology can't produce a pair of X-Ray Spex that really work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Garvin
    A mumbly and mindless sci-fi drama that would never have made it on the air if NBC weren't so desperately scrambling for new pilots as the COVID production lockdown virus slouched toward Hollywood last spring.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Garvin
    Cloaking hardboiled fiction, cynical characters, and somber existential heroes not just in midnight-blurred alleys but in the very climate implied a darkness without escape, a perpetual state of moral ambiguity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Glenn Garvin
    It's diverting in an Agatha Christie sort of way, but ultimately beside the point. Whoever Q is, he clearly didn't really have access to secret White House dope. And as the Trump administration fades further into the background, so does the importance of Q's identity. Paranoia may strike deep, but then it moves on.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Glenn Garvin
    Fails entirely on its own demerits. It's about three siblings—one boundlessly rich (he just bought Matt Damon's house), one grindingly poor (she can't afford Damon's movie tickets, much less his home) and one going down fast (his last novel sold five copies, one of them to the rich brother). No worry—they're all brought together by mutual peevishness, spite and jealousy. After extensive and determinedly unfunny airing of grievances, they conclude that, as the rich brother declares, that "we're all screwed up." And, he adds: "What a relief!" Speak for yourself, buddy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 10 Glenn Garvin
    Rebel is merely a boorish bore.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Garvin
    With a talented cast and writing staff and a truly original premise, it might really turn into something exceptional—if the American Taliban doesn't put it to death first.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Glenn Garvin
    The women of Flack are relentlessly savage: in their disdain for their wayward clients; in their open contempt for the stupid and greedy journalists they use as pawns in their schemes; and in their off-handed manipulation of their husbands and boyfriends. This is all very entertaining. Flack will undoubtedly win the Emmys for Bitchiest Dialogue and Best Puking Sound Effects.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Garvin
    The characters are so isolated and, often, alienated, from one another that the early hours of the show have an almost surreal sense of aimlessness, like a jigsaw puzzle with most of the pieces missing. But as they start to fill in, and the story starts to reach backwards, Possessions turns from weirdly fascinating to just plain fascinating.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Garvin
    Aiding Clarice considerably is the performance of Australian actress Rebecca Breeds (Pretty Little Liars) as Starling. Breeds wisely patterns her diffident, even shy, Clarice after that of Jodie Foster in Silence of the Lambs, cloaking her intellectual capacity in bashful humility toward authority that sometimes cracks open to reveal repressed rage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 35 Glenn Garvin
    With five characters and about four jokes, Kenan violates even the loosest Hollywood mathematical equations for success.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Glenn Garvin
    Young Rock's amiable goofiness draws heavily, and successfully, on the personality of its pleasantly flaky star and subject.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Garvin
    Trickster does achieve a certain underlying creepiness, but it's often hard to distinguish that from the general desolation of the landscape.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Glenn Garvin
    It's not the worst of the genre, but that's light-years away from calling it good.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 55 Glenn Garvin
    Startlingly, it's not bad; or, as Darren McGarvin said of the bottle of wine he found under the tree in A Christmas Story, "This wine isn't bad. It's not good, but it's not bad."

Top Trailers