Gregory Ellwood

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For 150 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Gregory Ellwood's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Call Me by Your Name
Lowest review score: 25 Wakefield
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 150
150 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    No one would deny Sisto clearly has a vision of what he’d like to accomplish and shows flashes of humor here and there, but the almost overt influences of any number of other filmmakers (Michael Haneke, ‎Yorgos Lanthimos, and Sean Durkin immediately come to mind) have the cumulative effect of making the proceedings feel numbingly familiar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What’s strikingly revolutionary in Pleasure is how Thyberg’s gaze provides Bella’s story much-needed context by embracing the mundane aspects of this particular world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    To say it’s a stellar feat of cinema is something of an understatement.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    It becomes pretty obvious early on that CODA is one of those movies where you know where the story is going pretty much the entire time, but the elements harmonize so beautifully it still sucks you in.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Ewing makes a creative decision in the final act of the picture which simply sucks all the air out of the room.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    What there is, however, is Nasibullina and she makes you root for Velya despite all the character’s faults
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Nine Days is the sort of original cinematic art that, these days, is few and far between.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite the efforts of Hopkins and an outstanding ensemble, Zeller can’t divorce his feature directorial debut from its theatrical origins.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    There is barely a manufactured minute in the film. Everything fits together organically and in a narrative film that is much harder to pull off than it sounds.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    At almost two-hours Worth somehow feels almost twice as long. Granted, we understand it’s a cliché to describe a film in such terms, but Colangelo and Borenstein are trying to cover too much ground that is, for lack of a better word, repetitive.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What you take away from Wendy, however, is that Zeitlin’s talent to soar cinematically remains intact. He can transport you to a fantastical world without the benefit of massive CG effects or a massive set on a gigantic soundstage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Dominic Cooke’s Ironbark is blessed with fantastic turns from Benedict Cumberbatch, Jessie Buckley and Rachel Brosnahan to up the stakes and make it all feel a bit fresher than it actually is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Blank knows exactly what narrative territory she’s in and uses the dramatic conflicts at bay to make a number of decidedly funny and oh, so painful points.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Simien’s strengths come to the forefront once again and that’s what makes it so difficult to pinpoint why the final product doesn’t exactly gel together as it should.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    The only aspect of the film that even makes it watchable ends up being Shannon’s portrayal of Westinghouse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Simply put, this is an expertly directed first feature. Clapin’s willingness to be patient as a scene unfolds, to let the hand experience the surreal images from its perspective, to let the quiet captivate the audience is beyond impressive.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The problem, unfortunately, is that Hope Gap is based on Nicholson’s play “The Retreat from Moscow” and the proceedings never really leaves the theater. Despite the director’s attempts to throw in [a few] drone shots to break up the drama and make the affairs inherently more cinematic, there are few scenes that don’t seem as though they would be more intriguing played out in front of a live audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What elevates Hustlers from an entertaining con job flick to something noteworthy is that the racket isn’t inherent to the story Scafaria wants to tell. Many filmmakers will say their film tackles female empowerment, but few do the legwork to make an integral and authentic part of the story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    A hodgepodge of a story that only really works when Glaisher and Wren are in the sky. And when they are it’s absolutely gorgeous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Somehow the filmmakers found lightheartedness and – gasp – laughs in a story of political intrigue at the top of the notoriously buttoned-up Catholic Church.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    When Shults soars under this structure, he composes some brilliant moments. When he falters, it seems like the movie doesn’t know where to go or when to end (if it even wants to).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Ford v Ferrari is the sort of cinematic entertainment that sucks you in and won’t let you go until you cross the finish line.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    The film’s title isn’t just referring to the past, but what everyone involved witnesses in their communities everyday. By letting this fester and not confronting it dead on are we not saying we’re fine with being “barbarians’? It’s a credible question the filmmaker leaves you to ponder in private.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    His film feels more like a collection of wonderfully envisioned set pieces that don’t fully form a coherent whole.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    For every scene that doesn’t work there is another that’s spellbinding. It’s gutsy and provocative and, frankly, that’s a compliment you can’t give many independent films these days.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    A somewhat cool robot does not make a movie. ... The eventual twists aren’t that surprising and don’t really make sense in the context of even the film’s most basic world building.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    There is drama in the source material for sure, but maybe a little more style could have helped elevate this moment in history for the masses.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The combination of Thompson’s sharp delivery and Kaling’s commercially friendly script make the film’s charms hard to resist.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    The film team is so strong and the direction so fine that it’s simply hard to believe this is actually Talbot’s first full-length feature film. And to detail much more would spoil the genuine surprise of their many on-screen artistic contributions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Honey Boy may center on the impressive portrayals of three talented actors, but it’s the woman behind the camera that makes it soar. You simply can’t wait to see what she does next.

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