Gregory Ellwood

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For 150 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Gregory Ellwood's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Victoria
Lowest review score: 25 Wakefield
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 150
150 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    No one would deny Sisto clearly has a vision of what he’d like to accomplish and shows flashes of humor here and there, but the almost overt influences of any number of other filmmakers (Michael Haneke, ‎Yorgos Lanthimos, and Sean Durkin immediately come to mind) have the cumulative effect of making the proceedings feel numbingly familiar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What’s strikingly revolutionary in Pleasure is how Thyberg’s gaze provides Bella’s story much-needed context by embracing the mundane aspects of this particular world.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    To say it’s a stellar feat of cinema is something of an understatement.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    It becomes pretty obvious early on that CODA is one of those movies where you know where the story is going pretty much the entire time, but the elements harmonize so beautifully it still sucks you in.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Ewing makes a creative decision in the final act of the picture which simply sucks all the air out of the room.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    What there is, however, is Nasibullina and she makes you root for Velya despite all the character’s faults
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Nine Days is the sort of original cinematic art that, these days, is few and far between.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite the efforts of Hopkins and an outstanding ensemble, Zeller can’t divorce his feature directorial debut from its theatrical origins.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    There is barely a manufactured minute in the film. Everything fits together organically and in a narrative film that is much harder to pull off than it sounds.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    At almost two-hours Worth somehow feels almost twice as long. Granted, we understand it’s a cliché to describe a film in such terms, but Colangelo and Borenstein are trying to cover too much ground that is, for lack of a better word, repetitive.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What you take away from Wendy, however, is that Zeitlin’s talent to soar cinematically remains intact. He can transport you to a fantastical world without the benefit of massive CG effects or a massive set on a gigantic soundstage.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Dominic Cooke’s Ironbark is blessed with fantastic turns from Benedict Cumberbatch, Jessie Buckley and Rachel Brosnahan to up the stakes and make it all feel a bit fresher than it actually is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Blank knows exactly what narrative territory she’s in and uses the dramatic conflicts at bay to make a number of decidedly funny and oh, so painful points.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Simien’s strengths come to the forefront once again and that’s what makes it so difficult to pinpoint why the final product doesn’t exactly gel together as it should.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    The only aspect of the film that even makes it watchable ends up being Shannon’s portrayal of Westinghouse.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Simply put, this is an expertly directed first feature. Clapin’s willingness to be patient as a scene unfolds, to let the hand experience the surreal images from its perspective, to let the quiet captivate the audience is beyond impressive.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The problem, unfortunately, is that Hope Gap is based on Nicholson’s play “The Retreat from Moscow” and the proceedings never really leaves the theater. Despite the director’s attempts to throw in [a few] drone shots to break up the drama and make the affairs inherently more cinematic, there are few scenes that don’t seem as though they would be more intriguing played out in front of a live audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    What elevates Hustlers from an entertaining con job flick to something noteworthy is that the racket isn’t inherent to the story Scafaria wants to tell. Many filmmakers will say their film tackles female empowerment, but few do the legwork to make an integral and authentic part of the story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    A hodgepodge of a story that only really works when Glaisher and Wren are in the sky. And when they are it’s absolutely gorgeous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Somehow the filmmakers found lightheartedness and – gasp – laughs in a story of political intrigue at the top of the notoriously buttoned-up Catholic Church.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    When Shults soars under this structure, he composes some brilliant moments. When he falters, it seems like the movie doesn’t know where to go or when to end (if it even wants to).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Ford v Ferrari is the sort of cinematic entertainment that sucks you in and won’t let you go until you cross the finish line.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    The film’s title isn’t just referring to the past, but what everyone involved witnesses in their communities everyday. By letting this fester and not confronting it dead on are we not saying we’re fine with being “barbarians’? It’s a credible question the filmmaker leaves you to ponder in private.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    His film feels more like a collection of wonderfully envisioned set pieces that don’t fully form a coherent whole.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    For every scene that doesn’t work there is another that’s spellbinding. It’s gutsy and provocative and, frankly, that’s a compliment you can’t give many independent films these days.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    A somewhat cool robot does not make a movie. ... The eventual twists aren’t that surprising and don’t really make sense in the context of even the film’s most basic world building.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    There is drama in the source material for sure, but maybe a little more style could have helped elevate this moment in history for the masses.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The combination of Thompson’s sharp delivery and Kaling’s commercially friendly script make the film’s charms hard to resist.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    The film team is so strong and the direction so fine that it’s simply hard to believe this is actually Talbot’s first full-length feature film. And to detail much more would spoil the genuine surprise of their many on-screen artistic contributions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Honey Boy may center on the impressive portrayals of three talented actors, but it’s the woman behind the camera that makes it soar. You simply can’t wait to see what she does next.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Alfre Woodard may have graced us with the performance of her career.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The initial inspiration was clearly there, but the execution simply falls short.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Where it surprises is in Bell’s fantastic performance and the fact it eventually stops becoming a laugh out loud comedy. It soon dives into much more of a heartwarming drama with a few random jokes thrown in.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Orley’s direction is fine, and the picture is well made for a low budget indie, but Davidson is all you’ll really remember when you leave the theater. And for many, that’ll be enough.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Overall, “Fighting” works thanks to Merchant’s witty screenplay, Pugh’s transformative performance, Vaughn’s inspired off the cuff one-liners (likely improvised) and a cast that clearly respects the Bevis family story.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Apologies in advance, but for lack of a better descriptor the whole thing is a mess. It’s not even good enough to be a cult movie which is backhanded compliment anyway. But, hey, at least the actors tried.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    There’s a line for an audience between conveying the true horror of what occurred and being excessive and Maras barely avoids the latter.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Fogelman clearly gets a thrill in constructing a tapestry full of one random tragedy after another (seriously, almost nothing good seems to happen to these people long term). And he also appears to love manipulating the audience’s emotions with these subsequent tragedies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite the melodramatic ending, you leave the theater wanting to root for the film and its characters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Greta is one of those thrillers where you see almost every twist coming, but the actors are so into it that you still get sucked in.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Demange, who earned glowing reviews for his debut “’71,” tries to guide all these plotlines and characters with a steady hand, but it often feels too unwieldy. There are simply too many storylines and threads competing with each other. The result is a movie that it feels like snippets of a life instead of a portrait of one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Assayas has often shown great wit in his screenplays (most recently in “Clouds of Sils Maria”), but there is a rhythm to his writing here that is surprisingly good.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Israel, as noted by her own writing, had a caustic wit that works with McCarthy’s comedic talents. She also brings a depth of emotion to Israel that comes to a head in a wonderfully composed scene with Grant at the end of the film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Boy Erased has problems depicting the fear, intimidation and psychological trauma such programs can inflict on even the most willing of participants. But that’s likely because, at its core, the film isn’t really about the gay conversion experience.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    When Kusuma, Kidman and Destroyer finally kick it into high gear it’s so, so worth the wait.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Yes, Jackman’s impressive portrayal of Hart is at the center of “The Front Runner” (it’s one of the best performances of his career), but Reitman uses a large cast of characters to give depth to the events in question.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    While Leigh transports you back to 1819 through these rich characters, he simply tests the audience’s patience in getting to the heart of the story. There is an abundance of formal speeches and long monologues in the film, and they are often arduous and repetitive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    The various marvels of the movie aren’t just the sparks between Redford and Spacek or Waits’ dry humor but often, Lowery’s inspired direction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    It is almost impossible, however, to watch Other Side Of The Wind without taking its history into account. That makes the final product uniquely captivating.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Sauvage captures the multitude of emotion or lack of, that come with Leo’s tricks. There’s jealousy, pain, excitement, cruelty and even monotonous apathy where you’d least expect it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite youngster Aksoy-Etaix’s commendable performance, not only will you not believe, you also won’t care.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    The problem with Dosunmu’s follow-up to the more compelling “Mother Of George” is that there is so little story — and what story there is moves at such a snail’s pace — that all you have to look at are Young’s impressive compositions and then you wait…and then wait some more.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Reitman is often at his best when he can join forces with an exceptional actor, and Theron once again helps with the heavy lifting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Phoenix is almost otherworldly here. It’s his charismatic performance that often carries the film through its repetitive moments as he expertly takes Callahan on an emotional roller coaster filled with the highest highs and the lowest lows.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Gilroy has fashioned a character study that has moments that are incredibly well written.... What’s extremely disappointing is that the screenplay’s through line is simply not that interesting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    If not for Sareum’s charismatic performance the film might fold like a house of cards.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The conflicts are obviously real, but there is something about the tone that’s just off through most of the picture.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    What immediately comes to the forefront is that McDonagh has choreographed an almost impossible feat of a brutally dark comedy that, thanks to both Rockwell and McDormand, elicits an emotional response you simply don’t see coming.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    “Five Foot Two” is mostly about a woman pushing forward with her career in pain, and we’re talking chronic literal pain.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    There are two things that make this movie stand apart: Metcalf and Gerwig.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    The worst aspect of ‘Rebel’ is that Strong seems to have no vision as a filmmaker. The movie thinks it’s throwing in some wise words about the art of writing, but they are superficial at best.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Few would argue that Oldman isn’t one of the finest actors of his generation, but this is a tour de force portrayal that will define his body of work for decades to come.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    How many times have you read that it’s really hard to duplicate the success of the first film in a sequel? Probably more than you can remember. Well, here’s a newsflash: Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 pulls that feat off with only a little strain and a belly of genuine emotion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 25 Gregory Ellwood
    It goes without saying that Cranston has a lot to carry on his shoulders and he does an admirable job. It’s hard not to laugh every so often at one of Wakefield’s snide remarks and that’s effectively because of how Cranston sells it. But even this accomplished actor can’t make you feel any sympathy for a character whose actions defy convention in the most unimaginative ways.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Considering how much screen time they share together, Lister-Jones and Pally need to have fantastic chemistry to keep the audience rooting for Anna and Ben and, luckily, they have more than enough.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    At no point in Patti Cake$ is there ever a hint that Macdonald is unable to legitimately rap. She’s simply a revelation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    While you know where “God’s Own” is going most of the way Lee finds a way to breathe new life into it (to a point).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    As the story progresses it becomes less and less interesting and worst of all – gasp – cliché.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    There are elements of “The Yellow Birds” that should equate to a unique cinematic experience. Unfortunately, like Bartle’s return home, you leave the theater somewhat dazed, confused and thinking of what went wrong.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Mudbound soars thanks to the impressive performances of the ensemble cast and, notably, Rees’ intent on depicting the harsh reality of this pre-Civil Rights era, warts and all.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Before I Fall is a movie that will make its core audience of teenage girls melt and is a nice diversion for everyone else. It will make Hollywood studios take Russo-Young more seriously and be a calling card for Deutch, Sage and Miller. That’s not so bad, is it?
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Outside of a few short moments in Ismail Merchant and James Ivory’s “Maurice,” and Ang Lee’s “Brokeback Mountain,” the love and intimacy between two male characters has never truly felt this real or emotionally heartbreaking in a theatrical context. It’s almost revolutionary. It’s cinematic art.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    The movie lives and dies, however, on Ingrid herself and, remarkably, Plaza finds a way for you to root for her even when she crosses line after line after line.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Unlike McDowell and Lader’s underrated 2014 comedic thriller “The One I Love” the most disappointing aspect of The Discovery is that it’s something of a bore. And when you find out what “The Discovery” really is you simply don’t care anymore.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    What Blair is trying to do is quite ambitious for his first feature. He alternates moments of high comedy with serious tension and a touch of magic realism for kicks. For the most part, the tone works.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    There is a sense of exhaustive familiarity that permeates throughout Taylor Hackford’s new dramedy The Comedian.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Make no mistake; there is no disputing this is clearly one of Marvel’s better efforts. And, yes, attempting to break from the expected shackles of a lineage of other origin movies is difficult, but you still feel the formula straining at the core of Doctor Strange.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite Herzog’s efforts to keep it as entertaining as possible, “Inferno” does feel like it overstays its welcome a bit. That being said the access and footage they’ve compiled coalesces into a truly cinematic experience. One that would be hard for anyone else to even fathom attempting to duplicate.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Masterfully played by Annette Bening, Dorothea is a fascinating character of contradictions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    The characters are so well drawn (and the relatively young cast steps up to the plate) that combined with the material’s natural tension you’ll find yourself riveted to the proceedings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The picture is genuinely entertaining and moving, but the fact it even exists in the first place is something you simply cannot dismiss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    What’s most disturbing is Jackson’s pedestrian direction has resulted in a film that barely recognizes how powerful this is in contemporary society.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Cedar’s smart dialogue and direction lift Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer (hereby just referred to as ‘Norman’) above expectations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Outside of the Berg’s incredible depiction of the Deepwater’s destruction and the escape of a majority of its crew, the picture also benefits from two fantastic performances by Wahlberg and Rodriguez.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    All of “Pastoral’s” problems could have been slightly forgiven if McGregor showed a hint of inspiration behind the camera.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    When the big show finally happens at the end of the picture? You can’t help but smile.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    As a piece of filmed entertainment Snowden is certainly a watchable endeavor, but Stone and screenwriter Kieran Fitzgerald’s script is often an odd mix of hero worship, conspiratorial thriller and cringe worthy dialogue.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Una
    For a feature debut, Una is bursting with exceptional confidence and style. The aesthetic is Jonathan Glazer meets Andrea Arnold and it assures that some of the script’s more staged scenes hold your attention.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Like Brokeback Mountain a decade ago, Moonlight is a piece of art that will transform lives long after it leaves theaters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    In the end it’s really Eastwood who makes sure the film transcends the typical biopic tropes. At a spry 86 it’s unclear how much longer he’ll remain behind the director’s chair, but “Sully” proves that with the proper material and actors he can still stir emotions with the best of them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    While Bercot's intentions are admirable, she and co-screenwriter Marcia Romano have conjured up too many moments that play out like thousands of courtroom scenes you've seen before.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Dunn demonstrates an impressive ability to bring his unique interpretation of the coming out process to life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The Program works when it has you questioning how on earth this secret could be kept so quiet for so long when so many people knew exactly what was going on.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The movie wants to make a statement about the intersection of art and family, but it’s all too muddled to add up to anything that astute.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    It’s simply a very well done movie that features Maggie Smith’s best work in years (and, yes, she’s better here than any of her years on “Downton Abbey”).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    The film is at its best when the storyline gets dangerously real and Bullock’s character struggles to justify the back room king making of a campaign with the needs of the country’s poor majority.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Hands down one of the best films of the year, Sebastian Schipper has directed a one-shot film that is truly a captivating cinematic experience.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Cranston has his moments and you have to laud his attention to detain in channeling Trumbo’s unique voice and mannerisms. Unfortunately, he’s so committed that his character borders on being a caricature.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    An impressive cast and significant real-life events can’t trump the fact it’s a badly made movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    To say Blanchett is good here is a grave understatement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    All the actresses do their best with the material, but only Mulligan truly transcends its limitations.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Its admittedly interesting source material, but the movie’s tone is all over the place and not in a good way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Considering Redmayne’s achievement it’s almost shocking that you can argue Vikander gives the more memorable performance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite the worthy efforts of stars Tom Hiddleston and Elizabeth Olsen, the Hank Williams biopic I Saw The Light is a shockingly bad movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    This sort of storyline could go wrong very quickly, but thanks to some fortuitously funny moments, Vallee’s assured direction and Gyllenhaal’s spectacular performance it’s surprisingly compelling. And, let’s be absolutely clear: it’s Gyllenhaal who keeps it all together.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Fukunaga not only directed the film but also co-wrote the screenplay and served as director of photography. His efforts have resulted in a brazenly confident piece of cinematic art where every image immerses you deeper and deeper into Agu’s horror.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Despite Depp’s seemingly flawless efforts, less may have been more in conveying just how bloodthirsty Bulger was. Where “Mass” excels is with a stellar cast whose spot on performances keep your interest as the film moves along.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Sorkin’s voice dominates the discourse and the film rarely has a chance to catch its collective breath. While you have to give the duo credit for attempting an unconventional structure, it’s a choice that arguably only works thanks to the contributions of a stellar ensemble.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Room is simply a movie about mother and son trying to adapt to the outside world after years of forced captivity. And the surprise is how succinctly it captures this drastic life change from the perspective of five-year-old.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    Like any creative endeavor a film is the sum of its parts. In the most elementary terms it needs a screenplay as a base, a cast to bring the script to life and a director to orchestrate the pieces into something of considerable impact. Excuse the hyperbole, but Tom McCarthy's Spotlight is an example of when all those pieces fit together almost perfectly.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    What makes “We Are” worth your time is Joseph’s skill in conveying the euphoria of dance music in the context of an actual movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    The fact Tomlin is so good also highlights the film's biggest problem. Too much of what works in Grandma comes from the subtle touches Tomlin, Elliott and Harden bring to their characters, not Weitz’s script.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Watts co-wrote the screenplay with Christopher D. Ford (“Robot & Frank”) and, frankly, it’s not as clever or compelling as it wants to be.... The filmmaker does deserve credit, however, for conjuring up some nicely tense cinematic moments.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    If you’re wondering whether you’ll believe Streep is a convincing rock musician, please. It’s Meryl Streep here. She sounds like she’s ready to open for Bruce Springsteen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    For all of Heller's impressive direction, she could have delivered something soulless without Powley's contributions.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The film feels 30 minutes longer than its 109 minute run time mostly due to the fact that “Paper” seems distinctly like three different films.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Edgerton, who also wrote the screenplay, shows a masterful touch in playing with conventional expectations.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Unfortunately, Southpaw descends into a tedious exercise of formulaic filmmaking that leaves you feeling worse for Gyllenhaal and Whitaker than the characters they play on screen.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Minions lives and dies on its sight gags and luckily for Coffin and Balda they are almost non-stop.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    There is a faith that the story and characters will keep the audience engaged, even if there isn’t a bright and shiny thing to distract them in a every single scene.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Gregory Ellwood
    In terms of filmmaking prowess, "remarkable" may not do Laszlo Nemes' holocaust drama "Son of Saul" justice.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Beyond the performances, this new “Macbeth” benefits from Kurzel’s inspired eye, the increasingly impressive talents of cinematographer Adam Arkapaw (“True Detective”) and Fiona Crombie’s period-loving production design. The world they have created for this tragedy may overwhelm, but it's certainly impossible to forget.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    The resulting film is yet another example of a Black List script that does not work on the screen. And, frankly, we're not sure an auteur other than Van Sant would have fared any better.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Sicario starts and ends with Blunt’s impassioned performance (and she's spectacular in her final scene), but it’s Del Toro who is the real standout.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Youth has some significant points on frustration of fame, ageism and our natural inclination to lose perspective, but it’s primarily about finding peace and happiness in your life. That may sound painfully obvious. It may even sound cliché. But somehow Sorrentino is able to fashion the film's diverse elements into an emotional narrative that makes it all feel fresh and new. And that’s truly worth celebrating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 42 Gregory Ellwood
    Hou and cinematographer Ping Bin Lee (“Renoir”) produce some stunning images on location (one conversation takes place as a fog beautifully emits from the bottom of a valley), but it’s hard to find a thematic connection between the directing style Hou has chosen and the story.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Jia probably made a mistake directing the 1999 sequence in such an over-the-top and stilted tone (it also feels more like 1989 than the turn of the century), but the rest of the film is incredibly well done.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Demoustier is charismatic enough to almost help Donzelli pull it off, but Elkaïm is so stiff as Julien you never understand why Marguerite is willing to risk her life in the first place.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    It's good stuff and, in a perfect world, will prompt Hollywood execs to take Winocour's directing skills very seriously.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Lanthimos presents a fully formed original vision that hits a perfect tone even when the narrative begins to get away from him a bit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Trier is far too talented for there not to be some good things here, but it just doesn’t add up to much.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Love may not be as erotic as many expect. The gratuitous sex may eventually start to bore many viewers. Some may even take off their 3D glasses because they simply aren't necessary. Yet, for all its faults, Love is a film that somehow still resonates.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    A slightly bumpy two hours of storytelling, but it's peppered with wonder and unexpected humor.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Only the combined talents of both Blanchett and Mara can make the film's powerfully realized finale work.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    His characters may spout Kant and debate the ethics of different human interactions, but it's only sugar coating on top of what is effectively a simple and familiar story.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    Amy
    Amy also turns the camera back on the viewer who saw, mocked and ignored Winehouse’s descent as it transpired across the media landscape. How could the world collectively denigrate a woman whose addiction was destroying her? In this era of reactionary social media it’s a warning to all of us to be wary of stoning the next Amy in the digital town square.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Much of the success of the film is due to the four leads who seamlessly work the one or two outrageous moments into the story without resorting to over-the-top characterizations.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    While Bening is incredible playing a fading Hollywood starlet in Paul McGuigan’s Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool, it’s her co-star, Jamie Bell, who might be the film’s real secret weapon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Bale and Pike are superb. Despite some melodramatic tendencies and strange choices in Cooper’s script they make you have sympathy and compassion for each of their characters.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Too many of the jokes fall flat and as the film moves forward you’re so captivated by the bizarre plot twists that recognizing the humor becomes secondary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    The film’s inherent problems, however, are two fold. First, the third of the picture is an absolute slog. The Zellner’s may have though this was a creative choice to make the comedic scenes funnier when they finally hit, but it simply doesn’t work. Second, the funny bits simply aren’t as funny as they should be.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Fox knows firsthand the events that occur to Dern’s character in her feature narrative debut because they happened to her. And beyond its creative success and failures, her willingness to tell her own story in such graphic detail is a startlingly brave act.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    Colangelo’s adaptation continually feels like it’s missing something.... Luckily though, Collangelo has Gyllenhaal, who is exceptional at times here, to carry it through.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Gregory Ellwood
    From a narrative standpoint, Decker and her three writing collaborators have fashioned a reasonably compelling story. What makes the film transcendent is how she uses the art of cinema to convey it and Howard’s phenomenal performance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Gregory Ellwood
    As always, Dinklage is exquisite in a mostly silent performance that conveys the pain and survivor’s guilt Del has bottled up inside him following the incident.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Gregory Ellwood
    Sadly, even with the contributions of four screenwriters and the still underrated talents of Byrne...it simply doesn’t work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    It’s well crafted and compelling at times thanks mostly to the casts’ efforts, but there is an emptiness that permeates through the film as if a significant piece of Wilde’s demise is missing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Gregory Ellwood
    Where Akhavan succeeds is whenever she has the kids doing things teenagers would be doing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 58 Gregory Ellwood
    Jenkins has a vision and something interesting to say in Private Life, but it needs some serious editing to convey it succinctly.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Gregory Ellwood
    Yes, you’ll likely leave the theater blown away by Casal and Diggs’ considerable talent, but its Estrada’s vision that will haunt you.

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