For 657 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Guy Lodge's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Things to Come
Lowest review score: 0 The Murder of Nicole Brown Simpson
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 657
657 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Beans is a thoughtful, stirring reflection by someone who survived it all, quietly demanding acknowledgement not just of her land, but of her life.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Rather than taking a detached anthropological tour of the community, Bolognesi lets the Yanomami present themselves in their own words and on their own terms, thus enlivening everything from their mealtimes to their mythology.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    The jokes write themselves, though in The Phantom of the Open, screenwriter Simon Farnaby and director Craig Roberts make them sweeter and spryer than they could have been, while a wide-eyed, bucket-hatted Mark Rylance plays Flitcroft with abundant generosity of spirit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Whether wholly performed or partially authentic, The Tsugua Diaries wittily evokes the volatile mood swings of lockdown — how concentrated time with the same people can yield either irritation or intensified closeness from day to day, particularly in a sticky-hot summer haze.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Expect no surprises in Falling for Figaro, a corny, cute-enough carpe diem comedy, in which it’s a lovable ensemble — led by Danielle Macdonald, and spiked by a deliciously imperious Joanna Lumley — that brings the grace notes to a pretty standard-issue script.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Guy Lodge
    Ambitious but tediously precious, sincerely conceived but derivatively realized, The Blazing World throws an ornate heap of production design at an anemically scripted psychological metaphor, and counts on a combination of fairy dust and sheer determined nerve to make the whole contraption fly.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    An honest, affecting slab of working-class portraiture, altogether bracing with its thorny labor politics and salty sea air.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Guy Lodge
    Meise’s film is an exquisite marriage of personal, political and sensual storytelling, its narrative and temporal drift tightened by another performance of quietly piercing vulnerability from Franz Rogowski.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    A brash, gutsy, morbidly funny first feature from actor-filmmaker-podcaster Dasha Nekrasova, it runs on a premise that could have been written as a dare, or a prank.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Crisply made and gutsily performed as it is, this slender 78-minute film too often feels like pointed social allegory in search of a really good cover story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    It might do writer-director Harry Wootliff a disservice to call her mature, thoughtfully conceived debut feature Only You one of the latter, but the tinderbox connection between stars Laia Costa and Josh O’Connor is what elevates this grown-up relationship study from respectable to lovable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Harry Wootliff’s jaggedly grown-up psychological drama True Things thrives on the hot, tense chemistry between its two excellent leads: It’s what pulls the audience through an obstacle course of potentially implausible scenarios that instead ring stingingly true.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Cruz is quite obviously having a ball sending up the ivory-tower vanities and mannerisms of the prodigious auteurs she’s worked with over the years. It’s a performance of fizzy, frenzied, physically elastic inventiveness, though she doesn’t render Lola a complete cartoon.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Superb ... 'The Box' may see [Vigas] relocating to Mexico, but it’s otherwise wholly of a piece with his debut in its terse, cut-to-the-quick refinement, its loaded, exquisitely composed images, and its fixation on shifting, complex man-versus-boy dynamics.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Sébastien Lifshitz’s lovely, clear-eyed documentary thoughtfully articulates the disorientation of gender dysphoria not from the inside out — Sasha is never less than calmly convinced of who she is — but from the outside in, as her transitioning identity sparks confusion and resistance in an uninformed community, causing her anxiety in turn.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    In this hard, unblinking film, even a moral victory feels like defeat.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Guy Lodge
    America Latina may frequently look and sound terrific, but a Ferrari spinning its wheels is spinning its wheels just the same.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Guy Lodge
    Suffice it to say that The Starling’s emotional arcs are as narratively complete as they are psychologically dashed-off.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Guy Lodge
    Happening is filmed and performed in such a delicate, skin-soft register, meanwhile, that the escalating terror of Anne’s situation is all the more pronounced, eventually pivoting into a realm of wholly realism-based body horror.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    7 Prisoners’ unfolds satisfyingly, precisely by not offering us complete satisfaction or certainty. The question hovers of whether Mateus can ever escape his prison altogether, or merely into one with more comfortable furniture.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    A frenzied vocal tone and wild, untethered physicality connects all the performances, with every character seemingly eager to burst out of their own body, and by extension, the life in which it’s stranded.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    There’s a barreling momentum to the filmmaking that feels true to the cut and thrust of restaurant life, regardless of the script’s digressions.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Its portrait of an easy-target industry goes soft just when it needs a little added spine, while the film’s abrupt tonal transitions from jaunty comedy to cross-generational weepie occasionally come at the expense of the characters’ own credibility. But it’s the overarching niceness of “Best Sellers” that sees it through.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Guy Lodge
    Wright’s particular affections for B-movies, British Invasion pop and a fast-fading pocket of urban London may be written all over the film, but they aren’t compellingly written into it, ultimately swamping the thin supernatural sleuth story at its heart.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Julia offers us glimpses of a complex, brittle personality beneath the robust persona, but is either too cautious or too genuinely besotted with the latter to pry it out.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    Arnaud Desplechin’s Deception is a strange, stifling but frequently intriguing attempt to find a cinematic match for the literary voice of Philip Roth, from his autofictional 1990 novel of the same name.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    There’s no obvious release or relief here, however: Ducharme’s is an untidy reckoning, as solemn and reticent as the film surrounding her.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Guy Lodge
    Who You Think I Am is a surprise package that plays its trump cards with shrugging insouciance, yielding giggles and gasps in equal measure, sometimes at once.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Guy Lodge
    As an experiment in steering a potentially tight thriller entirely by one character’s irrational whims, it’s abrasively compelling, even if the go-go-go plotting doesn’t withstand closest scrutiny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Guy Lodge
    Without trivializing the matters at hand, The Seer and the Unseen tempers complex national interests with droll human ones.

Top Trailers