For 56 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 21% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Hanh Nguyen's Scores

Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth: Blue Planet II
Lowest review score: 50 Proven Innocent: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 49 out of 56
  2. Negative: 0 out of 56
56 tv reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Hanh Nguyen
    By journey's end – which is satisfying even if viewers believe they know what to expect – our affection for the trio has grown. It's no wonder that the studios have already wagered on a second round of more Verne-inspired adventures.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Hanh Nguyen
    Overall, the updates made to the new "Looney Tunes" don't feel intrusive, but help smooth the transition from what used to play before features in movie theaters to at-home streaming. These energetic and bite-sized distractions are silly and fun, good for a mental break before moving on to something meatier
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    The series boasts visual mastery and a stimulating plot, but its message of hope and community gives it a far richer purpose. “Age of Resistance” matters, and that’s some admirable alchemy at work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    Thus far, the ’60s plotline appears to be the most emotional, the ’80s the most humorous, and the contemporary the most confusing. It remains to be seen if the end result of all this intrigue will be satisfying, but for now, the series’ arch tone and visual splendor are enough to stick around for the ride.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    In its third season, “Harlots” maintains everything that has made it occasionally difficult to watch – the societal injustice, the violence towards women, the massive cast of characters – but those aspects are what makes this series worthwhile since they also pay off with insight, spirit, and cheeky humor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    "Dark" Season 2 is completely incomprehensible unless one has seen the first season. ... Despite all of the time travelers gadding about where they don’t belong and the mind- and time-bending activities, devoted fans of "Dark" will only be inspired to dig in more. The characters are just far too compelling to abandon in their never-ending hours of need, and the challenge of having these characters break the cycle is also a draw.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Hanh Nguyen
    It’s the series equivalent to a vacation in that it tickles the brain but doesn’t tax it. It’s wish-fulfillment that’s the stuff of beach reads.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    The characters appear to have become unstuck. The show is as funny and heartfelt as ever, but appears to have hopped onto the bullet train of hope along with Chip. This sad clown may find happiness after all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    It’s admirable for “Pose” to experiment with its structure, even though those narrative flourishes detract from the message. The show is most successful when it balances the over-the-top ballroom spectacle with simplicity and authenticity.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    One could wax on (wax off) about these representation issues, but the show’s strength is also its weakness. “Cobra Kai” is simply too accurately a product of that specific ‘80s franchise. Sure, it could change, but why should it? The series remains entertaining despite its flaws, and fortunately it has a hero that negotiates this disconnect between retro mindset and contemporary consciousness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    The episode might be full of laughs and warm reunions, but this atrocity, this eerie undead fate, is what all of these characters are facing. It’s a good reminder of what is at stake, and frankly, the episode could have used more of these weighty moments and heightened tension. ... This is not to say that the sweeter and lighter character moments are unwelcome. But they should also exist alongside the dangerous moments.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    Warrior has its charms and much like a Chinese “Peaky Blinders” or “Gangs of New York,” it’s best when it leans into mankind’s reaction to corruption and injustice.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    While Alison’s perspective is grounded in deep and often agonizing emotions, the limited series doesn’t approach its storytelling with rancor or judgment. Instead, it gives justice to the women he lied to and allows them to retcon the deception and pain into something bigger.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    A.P. Bio has become more confident in its tone and characters in Season 2.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    Affecting performances keep the series from going off the rails. Beckinsale again proves a compelling leading lady, capable of measured emotion without becoming overly maudlin even while wielding a machine gun and evading bad guys. Charles Dance and Alex Kingston imbue their characters with irascible humanity, and newcomer Shalom Nyandiko gives a beautiful and natural performance as young Adidja, a young Congolese girl forced to join a militia.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    In the episodes given to critics for review, it remains escapist fare with a self-serious veneer of danger. Carpenter brings the emotional weight; let’s hope the show lives up to her performance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Hanh Nguyen
    Proven Innocent’s clumsy earnestness, undercut by a baffling insensitivity, is not the answer to standing out from the “Law & Orders” of TV and could turn off viewers from the very things it’s espousing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    Grounded problems and observations about everyday human failings amuse through recognition and familiarity. This is in keeping with a generation conversant with a vocabulary of authenticity and self-exploration. ... What saves Boomerang from becoming too precious--despite Bryson’s trips into nostalgia and romantic idealism--lies in its other lead. Jackson plays go-getter Simone with charismatic ease.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Hanh Nguyen
    The Other Two proves itself a worthy companion. It’s raucously sex-positive and delightfully weird, but underlying is a love of the very culture it’s mocking. It’s exactly the comedy that’s needed now: funny, feel-good, and forgiving of humanity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    The Magicians is provocative, entertaining, perturbing, and sometimes messy. But it is never boring.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    The Passage may not reach the grandiose and tragic heights of Cronin’s books, but it has the potential to be equally satisfying: It’s pragmatic, aggressive, and most of all, present.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    As it stands, Schooled doesn’t offer any convincing reasons to watch other than the crossovers from an already familiar world, and the requisite ‘90s references are too lightweight to be a true vehicle for nostalgia.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Hanh Nguyen
    Although each of the six parts are standalone stories, the order in which the episodes play feels deliberate in building emotional engagement and complexity, adding in a meditative and humorous breather in the middle, and then finishing with what feels like a call to action. The series doesn’t have to be binged, but it’s hearty and heartfelt fare for family Thanksgiving and holiday viewing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Hanh Nguyen
    It’s still too early to tell how this season will fare from just the first two episodes. There appear to be too many disparate plots, some without appealing characters. But based on the promise of Vincent, and what havoc his story can wreak on the others, we’re willing to be cautiously optimistic about what’s to come. For now, we’re in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Hanh Nguyen
    Bodyguard remains a gripping and thoroughly entertaining adventure that’s emotionally deft, but that clumsy ending dims its overall excellence.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    Once viewers power through the bafflingly slow first episode, the series becomes equally engrossing and enraging as patriarchal machinations push the siblings into intolerable situations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    The show feels like an old-fashioned adventure with teens banding together to uncover a mystery with limited adult interference.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    Goofy and curious, commanding and contemplative, Thirteen is already well on her way to demonstrating the complex emotional makeup that is the Doctor. She also demonstrates a cheerful, can-do spirit. ... With the exception of Tim Shaw’s unappealing self, very little about the episode feels Whovian. Gone is former showrunner Steven Moffat’s sense of play, both in the verbal sparring and convoluted storytelling.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Hanh Nguyen
    King Lear starts to break down near the last third with a choppiness that takes a toll on the logic of the piece. Still, the performances hold it together; this play has always been focused on human suffering. Amazon’s King Lear is by no means a definitive adaptation of what is arguably the Bard’s finest tragedy, but it is a thrilling and entertaining one.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Hanh Nguyen
    Each twist can potentially upset the direction that the show seems to be heading in and instead create something profound. But for now, it feels like a well-orchestrated attempt to force melodrama into meaning while hooking viewers with an icky sense of ghoulish curiosity.

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