Harry Windsor

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For 24 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Harry Windsor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 80 Ali's Wedding
Lowest review score: 30 Honeyglue
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 24
  2. Negative: 2 out of 24
24 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Harry Windsor
    Sequin in a Blue Room feels very much of the moment, but it’s upholstered by an impressive command of good old-fashioned craft.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    A cheerful spirit of open inquiry drives the documentary Queer Japan, in fact, which is tender, impressionistic rather than highly structured, and largely inexplicit — that amusingly candid vox pop notwithstanding.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Harry Windsor
    Flirts with becoming a savage indictment of affluent do-gooderism, but finally swerves to land on a vision of fraternity that’s altogether more optimistic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Harry Windsor
    The director and her cinematographer Eduardo Enrique Mayén never stray far from their leading lady’s face, and the Tianjin-born Chin delivers a performance of impressive minimalism, one that feels true rather than ingratiating.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    A tender portrait of the man's highs and lows that sheds new light on the broken years that directly preceded his suicide at 37.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Harry Windsor
    Skirting the line between documentary and fiction in a manner reminiscent of the Jalalabad-based Aussie filmmaker George Gittoes (thanked in the credits), the filmmaking could most charitably be described as artless, with a medley of shaky thousand-pixel close-ups providing a sense of detail that doesn't quite extend to the script.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Harry Windsor
    The whole thing looks as glossy as any of the filmmaker's spots for Nike, and though surf competition is not exactly suspenseful (at least for the uninitiated), the many vivid sequences on the waves are enough to justify the pic's presence on the big screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    Crass, colorful and hanging together by the barest of threads.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    The chief drawcard here is the conga line of old pros at the helm.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Harry Windsor
    This story of a courier racing against the clock to pay off a debt boasts a vivid sense of place, as well as some awkward dialogue and a lead performance not quite flavorful enough to make the character's self-sabotage compelling.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    As a family film in that vein it largely succeeds, buoyed by Black’s typical exuberance, Blanchett’s typical slyness and a richly evocative rendering of a Rockwellian suburb sprinkled with goofer dust. Less interesting, as is the way with many audience-avatar YA protagonists (sorry, Harry), is the main character, and Vaccaro’s rather hyper-articulated performance doesn’t help.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    In jettisoning the focus on family of the previous films, it gives us characters whose interactions with each other feel less than detailed, and who are more archetypal than real. But it’s good clean fun nevertheless, and the set pieces expertly supply the tension-and-release satisfactions of the genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Harry Windsor
    Following a thoroughly predictable rom-com template to thoroughly satisfying effect in a manner rarely seen in Australian cinema since Strictly Ballroom, Ali's Wedding hits all the beats while deftly capturing the tensions of the first-generation immigrant, torn between the norms of the country he calls home and those espoused by his family.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Harry Windsor
    The result is one of the most visceral essay films ever made, with Peedom and her Sherpa altitude cinematographer Renan Ozturk unfurling a series of glistening images that should be seen only on the biggest of big screens.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    It's certainly never boring, and Maringouin makes the madness feel queasily real.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    Buoyed by a reliably appealing star turn from James, this handsome tearjerker mostly sidesteps the tweeness of its title to become, somehow, both an old-fashioned romance and a detective story trumpeting gender equality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    Miike’s facility for the sharply sketched portrait, in between bouts of bladed mayhem, remains as shrewd as ever.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    River ends with relief, followed by a reversal that’s the last thing you expect from this unvarnished, unsentimental tale of self-preservation: an act of quietly powerful heroism.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Harry Windsor
    Assassin’s Creed is resolutely stone-faced, ditching the humdrum quips that are par for the course in today's blockbusters. But this is almost two hours of convoluted hokum that might have benefited from a few self-deflating jabs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    Girl Asleep might be about an awakening, but it’s not a sexual awakening, and this is one teen comedy in which, at long last, the geek doesn’t get the girl.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Harry Windsor
    A rollicking if somewhat ham-handed documentary about the life of costume designer Orry-Kelly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Harry Windsor
    The film never becomes morbid, though, which is both its strength and weakness.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Harry Windsor
    Writer-director James Bird’s second feature tells an entirely familiar story with a dash of transvestism thrown in, but doesn’t do anything interesting with that twist – and the lumpen screenplay is drag enough.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Harry Windsor
    Director J Blakeson...might be making franchise bait but he exhibits a relatively restrained reliance on spectacle, and the screenplay by Jeff Pinkner, Susannah Grant and Akiva Goldsman is light on the aphoristic earnestness that bogged down the most recent Hunger Games, or last year’s Goldsman-penned Insurgent.

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