For 83 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Henry Barnes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Double
Lowest review score: 20 Arthur Newman
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 83
  2. Negative: 3 out of 83
83 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Duplass and his co-writer, director Alex Lehmann, deliver this strange concoction – an improv bromance mixed with a tragic love story – with delicacy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Henry Barnes
    In picking at a system until it’s threaded, High Flying Bird is a classic Soderbergh construct.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    What’s left after the gore is stripped away is a mildly bloody, meatless horror.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    You can’t let your heroes be truly, purely horrible. But McDonagh’s moral twist comes in way too late and much too hard. It leaves you dizzy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    For all its smashed open cuts and swollen eye sockets, Younger’s film remains an oddly sterile experience. For a biopic, it is remarkably featureless.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    It’s a rehash that neither develops the character nor betrays him. It simply assumes that we still share his weaknesses and therefore care about the fool.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    There are moments when the film aches for focus. This again is down to Galloway. He is, like Blair, charismatic, opportunistic and never entirely consistent. The documentary lives and dies on those strengths and weaknesses.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    The film takes on Gabrielle’s listlessness, slumps into an opiated fug. The malady is mysterious and not easily treatable. It just exhausts you. It transforms from a story about release to just another jail. At times it felt like there was no escape.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    Big but boring, expansive but cheap-looking, Allegiant spins in place, waiting for next year’s Ascendent to come along and offer resolution. In all candour: you can do without it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Henry Barnes
    Things to Come is a smart, earnest undertaking: an exploration of the insecurity that can hit any of us, at any age, when we start to question the life we’ve built.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Jon Cassar’s film rejects the recent revisionism that’s flooded the genre. His take – a straight rip-off of the classics – is weirdly refreshing as a result.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    A macro argument is being filtered through people’s local concerns, but without getting to know the subjects, you can understand their suffering, but can’t feel it.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    Novelistic, rich and awfully silly, London Fields – like Ben Wheatley’s take on High Rise - is a long-awaited adaptation of a popular and gloomily prophetic book, that seems unnecessary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Henry Barnes
    Mr Right is Grosse Pointe Blank meets Dexter. Liman meets Tarantino. Derivative idea meets sloppy execution.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    It’s all fairly indulgent. But Sunset Song also has a viciousness that stops it falling too deep into a slumber
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    An outrageously misjudged drama that flirts with the story of the birth of the gay rights movement.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    [Jay Roach] wants the film to be fun, while the story is serious. It’s a good idea and an admirable intention. But it does suffer the odd wobble.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    Wheatley has made High Rise his story, instead of Ballard’s. That’s fine – but, unfortunately, it’s a less interesting take.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    A wide-eyed tribute to human ingenuity that packs enough snark to pull itself out of the black hole of earnestness, even if its fuel runs out partway through.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Where to Invade Next is a romantic film, equally affecting and annoying in its simplicity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    The artists’ blathering about the creative process and the nature of existence gets monotonous. It’s the ordinary folk that keep the film on-track.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    The cast are some of the most promising actors of their generation, but what chemistry there is between them is swept away by wave after wave of expository dialogue and ludicrous exclamation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    A sequel that is slick with silliness, but peppered with enough wit and peril to sustain the franchise’s momentum.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    Salvation was boring, but Genisys makes you sad. Risk-averse Hollywood has made a crash-test dummy of a once great franchise, simply throwing everything at it to see what it stands.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Inconsistency is A Perfect Day’s biggest problem. The script is scalpel sharp in some places, flabby as the well-blocker in others.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Henry Barnes
    The message is laid on slow and thick, but it's no less powerful for it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Even if Predestination is distinctive chiefly for Snook’s excellent performance, it’s still a tricksy story well-handled by its directors. It doesn’t offer any new twists on the genre, but it is clever enough to leave you satisfied that you don’t want the time back.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    There's so much thrown into Tip Top that nothing stands out.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Henry Barnes
    You can't help thinking he's missed the point of Pulp. Their music denigrated the people as much as it celebrated them. Habicht leaves the city in love with a surface-level reading of Cocker's take on it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Henry Barnes
    Director Francis Laurence ekes a paltry story out. The special effects are limp and the script a little creaky, although somehow it still manages to thrill.

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