Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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For 767 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ignatiy Vishnevetsky's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Au hasard Balthazar
Lowest review score: 0 Best Night Ever
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 75 out of 767
767 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While it’s able to periodically introduce a sense of danger—the burglars’ arrival, the sequence with the cop—it never creates the necessary continuity of dread and suspense.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Adapted from a 2008 memoir by former New York Times writer and editor Dana Canedy, it trades in cloying sentimentality and romance, the gooey melodrama done no favors by Washington’s stiff, anonymous direction.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The concept of a supervillain hellbent on Scottish independence is, admittedly, kind of funny (not to mention in keeping with the overall politics of the Kingsman films). But The King’s Man can’t figure out what to do with the idea, apart from having the largely unseen bad guy yell a lot in a Scottish accent. Like so much of the film, it’s trying to have it both ways—to be stupid and clever at the same time, and coming across mostly as the former.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Dumont does not make conventionally satisfying films, and, for all of his visual minimalism, he loves a mess. But he is more than capable of making movies that are engaging on a level beyond the purely intellectual. France, for the most part, isn’t one of them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    What Zeros And Ones conveys, in its shoestring terms, is the actual mood of a world of uncertainties.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Greene, whose earliest documentaries were rooted in the cinéma vérité tradition and its portraits of ordinary American lives, has crafted a poignant group portrait with something to say about the crossed wires of pain and memory.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This is the stuff that reminds us that Hollywood movies are made with charts and committees; we don’t enjoy it, but we put up with it in exchange for a good time. Red Notice only has the time part down. The good, like the bejeweled egg, is frequently missing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The idea of a group of decidedly minor-league cons trying to make it into the major leagues, maybe with a Now You See Me standard of realism, is not unappealing. But the promise of a brainless good time proves false once the actual thieving begins.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The gonzo factor (sadistic violence plus multiple music numbers) is intermittently engaging. The characters, not so much.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    However inconclusive as a story, the resulting film is a rarity among the overlong effects-heavy blockbusters of the last decade: One actually wishes it didn’t have to end so soon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The cast carries the film; Dowd, as Linda, is especially terrific. Yet the feeling that one is watching a latter-day teleplay is hard to shake: The unvisual, periodically clumsy direction never finds a way around the confined space or the ugly lighting. One can applaud Kranz’s restraint.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    What’s missing, among other things, is the dark humor that is the Addams family’s whole raison d’être.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The real problem is that the film isn’t trashy, soapy, or stylized enough be fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The fact is that, as a movie, Cry Macho is slow and sometimes dull. But as a statement by Hollywood’s oldest leading man and working director, it offers its share of gleaming low-key insights.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The grace notes—including a final shot that could, potentially, be Schrader’s most sublime—are lost among the inconsistencies, incomplete subplots, and airlessness. It shouldn’t take an expert to figure out what a film is trying to articulate. Unfortunately, in this case, it does.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The film, however, struggles to make a point under Colangelo’s stolid direction, losing itself in thinly drawn subplots while trying to give an unconvincing feel-good redemption arc to Feinberg, a character who is neither very interesting nor very sympathetic. The result feels, perversely, unearned and a little cheap.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Across the extended, handsomely shot sit-down interviews (with Ma’s daughter and the three other writers), what emerges is a fragmentary oral history of Chinese rural life across several transformative decades of the 20th century: family stories, tragedies, remembered slogans, the particulars of trying to grow crops in alkaline soil or coming of age as the son of a declared “counterrevolutionary.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    With a running time of 135 minutes, it eventually becomes exhausting—but that is partly the point of a film about a population going through the motions, of a mass event with a hole where the middle should be.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The film avoids every potential area of deeper interest: the economic conditions in Jan’s tiny ex-coal-mining community; the mid-to-late 2000s period setting; any nitty-gritty details about what it takes to train or race a steeplechase horse.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Watching the overqualified likes of Adams, Moore, Leigh, Henry, Oldman, et al. get tangled up in this gaslighting mystery is, admittedly, one of the pleasures of The Woman In The Window.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Every scene in Cliff Walkers will feel familiar: the close calls, the dead drops, the car chases, the poor man’s Hitchcockisms.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 25 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    This is supposed to be a world of fighters with bizarre outfits and combat abilities, but a lot of the time, the viewer will just find themselves staring at a screen that’s mostly rocks.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Donnybrook aside, Sutton has largely devoted his career to mood pieces like Dark Night and Memphis where concept is key. In Funny Face, he puts everything in movie-movie-ish scare quotes—a self-defeating approach for a paean to urban authenticity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    While Carnahan’s sense of humor has always been juvenile, in Stretch it at least benefitted from a gonzo factor and the crucial quality of having funny parts. Boss Level, however, is clumsy from the jump, with lame gags and a ceaseless, obtrusive voice-over that is always telling us why the next part is funny or what’s happening on screen (in case the viewer is distracted by their phone).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    There are too many montages and musical numbers that seem to be searching for a punchline.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Day, who’s very good, moves through it with comfort and charisma. Her Billie Holiday is as much a star in the green room as she is onstage, faced with applause or the harsh bathroom-mirror reflection of abuse and addiction. But many of the other characters might as well be reading off of cue cards.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    It’s revealed that the evidence against Salahi, who admits only to training with the formerly CIA-backed Afghan mujahideen in an al-Qaeda camp back in the early ’90s, consists of summaries of reports and confessions, which neither side is supposed to see. But instead of rising to the challenge of such potentially abstract subject matter, the film opts for clichés: file boxes, lawyer talk over fast food, the classic confrontation in a poorly lit parking lot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Critics are often accused of reviewing a filmmaker’s politics over the film. But the truth is that, outside of welcome stretches of humor (in the beginning) and tension (towards the end), there isn’t much more to Dear Comrades!. The script is filled with flat, rhetorical speeches that are done no favors by Konchalovsky’s static direction.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    The best thing that can be said about Palmer is that it’s innocuous: overlong and sentimental, but rarely annoying.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Rosi’s compositions, static and mostly wide angle, are ennobling, albeit ambiguously. Life is going on, but not as usual.

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