For 344 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Inkoo Kang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 It Felt Like Love
Lowest review score: 10 Audrey
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 81 out of 344
344 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    A movie so lifeless you’d have more fun guessing the Netflix niche group that the production is supposed to satisfy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The depiction isn’t remotely believable, but with Ronan endowing her character with both a steel spine and a fresh-faced naïveté (in a performance that makes her the film’s sole great asset), it’s fun, even inspiring.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    In the movies, love is cheap. It’s everywhere and nowhere, too often reduced to a formula or a reward. Beale Street knows better. It restores to love, romantic and familial, its sanctity—an ambition that makes it one of the most distinctive love stories in recent memory.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    For all its gentle groundedness, a quality that suffuses much of Kore-eda’s work, Shoplifters strenuously resists romanticizing its main characters. Its compassion is more convincing for it. So is its brilliance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    There’s something unseemly about singling out this story, about the seemingly narrow scope of racism and how easily it can be undone. Green Book decries those cultural pockets designed to make white people feel good, often at people of color’s expense. But that’s about all it does, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Cam
    The wonderfully versatile Brewer, who’s in virtually every scene, pulls off essentially three “characters”: Alice, Alice as Lola, and Bizarro Lola. It’s a bravura performance that flits between several realities while keeping the film grounded as the plot twists make narrative leap after narrative leap.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    The Nutcracker’s onslaught of wholesomeness also lays waste to anything that might stand in its way, leaving it crushed under the boot heels of its tin soldiers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    As Burning unfolds, it reveals new thematic layers until the film brims with allegorical potential.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Wildlife is a confident and compassionate first film. But with its protagonist mostly relegated to waiting and observing, its main raison d’être is Mulligan’s masterful turn as a thirtysomething woman coldly testing her abilities to see what she’s capable of, while terrified that she won’t be able to provide a good life for her son.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The lack of a precipitating factor, the invisible impulses behind addiction, and the episodic nature of recovery don’t exactly lend themselves to a compelling narrative structure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Until its resolution, Bad Times is a fun-enough romp through retro genre pleasures. But when it drags in the real world in its final scenes, it reveals itself to be just as fatuous as most such nostalgic pastiches tend to be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Private Life is certainly very good at shivving its characters at close range and gutting these dyspeptic, privileged white people when they deserve it. Save for Sadie’s charmed fate, I can’t fault Private Life for nailing what it sets out to accomplish. But its cultural narrowness, however well-expounded, also left me wondering about the trials and tribulations of all the other couples in that waiting room long after we’d seen the last of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Al-Mansour is both a natural and highly imperfect pick to adapt Trisha R. Thomas’ novel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    The second hour, though, strides toward its impressively unstinting resolution with magisterial confidence. With the characters finally stripped of the hardness they’d been forced to wear, their raw selves glisten in the sun until it’s time to wearily tie the carapace back on.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    The commitment of its all-star cast — which includes Oscar Isaac, Annette Bening, Mandy Patinkin, Antonio Banderas, Olivia Wilde, Olivia Cooke, and Samuel L. Jackson — can’t divert from the fact that its quills droop and sag, where they haven’t fallen off altogether. Behold the other North American flightless turkey.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    A Simple Favor reintroduces Lively as a character actress—a sexy, funny, award-worthy revelation.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    A joyless, soulless slog, wasting the efforts of co-stars Melissa McCarthy and Elizabeth Banks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    If Searching prefers to focus on plot mechanics over emotion, it at least makes up for it with minor but significant developments in Asian American representation. Given the predominance of the cultural and generational gap between parents and children in Asian American narratives, from "The Joy Luck Club" to "Master of None," it’s refreshing to see an example of assimilated families, whose numbers will only continue to increase.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    First-time feature writer Sofia Alvarez’s attempt to shrink Han’s lengthy, largely internal, and culturally specific story into a 97-minute movie is, simply put, a botch job. Stilted and scattered and strangely cold in its cinematography, it’s a handsomely shot whole lotta nothin’.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    BlacKkKlansman may well be the first film to frame the Trump era as one of regression in response to the progress of the Obama years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    Emotionally layered, culturally specific, and frequently hilarious, Crazy Rich is a transportive delight, with food montages to die for (the film offers a splendid showcase of Singapore’s justly celebrated street-food scene) and a wedding processional so exquisite I started crying at its sheer beauty.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Lines that should be funny are sacrificed to the breathless exigencies of the plot. The movie starts to feel like a slow suffocation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    It’s an important corrective to many contemporary and historical accounts of Hollywood, reinstating the queerness that has too often been straight-washed out of them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Directors Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s smartest tactic — the one that makes McQueen such a pleasure to watch, even for fashion outsiders — is giving viewers a front-row seat to the runway, then letting us judge the designer’s oeuvre for ourselves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The dual portrait that Blindspotting offers is heady and dense and mighty compelling.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    instead of focusing on the comedian’s complexities, Come Into My Mind focuses on his heartbreak. Perhaps Zenovich wanted to offer closure to fans still shocked by Williams’ final choice. But any artist is far more than their struggles. A proper remembrance would have understood that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Sorry to Bother You is so smart and so potent for so long — and so inventive yet thoughtfully measured in its use of the absurd — that the flaws simply give way. You don’t remember the endings of dreams, after all — just the parts that left you in a pool of your own sweat.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    By exposing on the top-down class-warfare origins of the annual event, the prequel elaborates on the series’ earnest political commentary — and exposes its limits as well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Portman’s voiceover performance is full of conviction, but I wish that Eating Animals gave us different models of vegetarianism than she and Foer, a diminutive actress and a bookish Brooklynite, respectively.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The fissure between father and daughter approaches like a snake. It sneaks up on you, then leaves you in paralyzed shock.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    The self-serious meditations on fate and responsibility — as well as the uneven but ever-charged flare-ups between Izzy and whoever she’s talking to — recall exercises in an acting class. By the end, we understand her motivations and recent biography, but precious little about who she is as a person.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Sure, young star Trevor Jackson (“Grown-ish,” “American Crime”) can’t fill O’Neal’s effortlessly dapper, achingly world-weary shoes, and few movie soundtracks can rival Curtis Mayfield’s legendary album for the first “Super Fly.” But this is a remake worthy of its original.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Hereditary only begins as a Greek tragedy. After a few too many twists and turns, it gets warped into a horror soap — an unnerving but ultimately numbing pile of calamities.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Ocean’s 8 is in many ways a mirror image of its predecessor, but it’s most delightful when it follows its own path toward girly transcendence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    In the end, the only transgression The Misandrists really commits is self-satisfied solipsism.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The cast is just as game for the broad humor as it is for the emotional beats; the latter’s familiarity doesn’t detract from its poignancy.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    Like a teen’s journal, writer-director Vaughn Stein’s debut feature is a scrapbook stuffed with allusions. The fondness is clear. But the resulting compilation is self-indulgent twaddle.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    The screenplay by Ryan Engle (“Rampage,” “The Commuter”) squanders its potential for emotional depth, making Breaking In a serviceable, but indistinct product.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    RBG
    Surely Ginsburg is far more interesting than her devotees, her enemies, or this film make her out to be.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    The new paint job is nice, but the insides may be too creaky to salvage.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    I saw Tully twice. After my first screening, I wasn’t sure what to think of the ending. The second time, I was convinced of the film’s brilliance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    With Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams starring as its furtive, inflamed lovers, Disobedience has pedigree to spare. But the result feels wonky and lopsided, as if several crucial scenes were left behind on the cutting-room floor.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    I Feel Pretty is an honest-to-God fiasco. Virtually every single aspect of this rigidly unfunny comedy is botched, from the characters to the plot, the themes to the core message.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    At 75 minutes, the resulting feature is the definition of slight, but just winsome and optimistic enough to justify itself.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The film makes its primary case eloquently and elegiacally: The only thing more lonesome than a cowboy, surveying a land where no one understands him, is that same cowboy without a horse.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Blockers is about as funny and heartfelt as studio comedies get (which isn’t meant as a backhanded compliment), while smart and insightful enough to double as a guide to raising teenage girls.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Chappaquiddick may or may not be what actually happened, but it gets at enough piercing truths.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Mo’s story feels rare, relevant and real. But we’re stuck on the outside looking in.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Ready Player One has no obligation to be a rigorous intellectual exercise, even if it amounts to a wasted opportunity to explore who else might steer tech, and society, toward greater equity. But it doesn’t have to be so facile, either. Maybe next time the screenwriters shouldn’t set the difficulty mode to “easy.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Ultimately, the overstuffed, under-dramatized film fails to fully develop the stakes at hand, but it features more thoughtful world-building than most faith-based films, as well as a bracing honesty about the difficulty of reconciling idealistic credos with a harsh and unforgiving world.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    An obligatory setup for a sequel slows down the final moments, but until then, Tomb Raider feels like a perfectly paced trio of espresso shots, with a shot of adrenaline to the heart as a chaser.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    If you don’t mind your movies nasty, brutish, and slight, you couldn’t ask for a more delectable chocolate-covered razor blade.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Writer-director Hirayanagi runs into a few minor pacing miscalculations, but Oh Lucy!, based on her 2014 short of the same name, is a tense, observant, and heartfelt accomplishment.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    The film is just plain bad, with an amateur cast (led by Taylor James), cut-rate special effects, who-cares storylines, and confusing details shoehorned in from the Bible.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Part incomplete rom com, part squishy lampoon, La Boda de Valentina ultimately falls short in both modes, but accomplishes just enough to warrant a RSVP.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The best surprise in A Fantastic Woman might be how lived-in Marina’s existence feels despite the tenuousness of her housing, her romantic fulfillment, and her legal rights.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The Chris Hemsworth vehicle is is often hammy, but also wryly funny, breath-stoppingly tense, and uncommonly intelligent. Its January dump is a disservice to a promising debut feature.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    Proud Mary did not screen for critics, nor should it have. It’s a copy of a copy of a mediocre original, with the drab aesthetics of a TV movie and the emotional hollowness of an infomercial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Grahame’s contributions to cinema are more than worthy of a reevaluation. Her complications, too, deserve more than this tepid, uncurious portrait.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    It’s too bad that Chastain’s heady, exquisitely subtle performance is dragged down by the laughably vehement male characters that seek to speak for her. You can’t keep a good woman down. But you can constantly talk over her, I guess.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    It’s a totally serviceable, if disappointingly uncinematic, film about a singular celebrity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The Square lands its bullseyes, over and over, with a faultless precision that grows duller with each strike.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    With its observational dispassion, My Friend Dahmer doesn’t quite help us understand why Jeff is so into killing, and it’s pretty much useless when it comes to clarifying how he justifies committing such atrocities to himself.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Professor Marston and the Wonder Women celebrates the bravery and creativity of Diana Prince’s mastermind and his muses, but with a tepidness toward the complications of their lives. The result is a gauzy, sexy ode to unconventionality that feels distinctly and disappointingly conventional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Una
    The film is meant to be a negotiation of what that long-ago relationship was, and it is that. But considered in our reality of pervasive sexual iniquity, Una also feels, whatever its creators’ intentions, an awful lot like a litany of self-serving excuses for pedophilic behavior, which may or may not be sincere.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Borrowing a few biographical details from Stanton’s life, the virtually plotless drama exudes admiration for its nonagenarian muse, but it’s built so sparely that it doesn’t have much to offer anyone who doesn’t already share its reverence for the “Paris, Texas” actor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    There’s enough good-naturedness and cultural specificity here, alongside a slight deviation from the usual immigrant narratives, to render it a dollop of sweetness and novelty that goes down easy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Inkoo Kang
    Handsome and moving if a bit cautious, “Battle” is full of smart complexities and sensational acting, and it deserves to be considered a serious awards contender.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Even when Ford strongly foreshadows future revelations, Strong Island holds narrative jolts, many fueled by shocks of betrayal. In losing William, the family also lost their faith in their country, their community, and in themselves.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    Director Gurinder Chadha (“It’s a Wonderful Afterlife,” “Bend It Like Beckham”) attempts to explore the cataclysmic human costs of the Partition without humanizing any of the Indian characters. And so we’re offered, on the 70th anniversary of the Partition (give or take a couple of weeks), another film about how brown suffering makes nice white people sad.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    The new horror-thriller is cheesy, asinine, convoluted and ludicrous. On the plus side, if your eyeballs need a vigorous workout, this will have them rolling nonstop.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    Chon’s dense, ambitious, and observant film is full of impressive craft and insight.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    Pilgrimage travels quite far on the momentum provided by a series of reveals. Each shifts the film’s stakes significantly enough that we look forward to the next divulgence as much as the succeeding battle scene. It ultimately stumbles when it reaches for depth, arriving at a hollow conclusion that mistakes cynicism for profundity.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 60 Inkoo Kang
    A minimalist film like Columbus depends almost entirely on the shading of the characters and the depths of the performances. By that metric, it’s a too-delicate creature, tickling and piquing instead of fully thrusting us into the realm of feelings.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    A day can be mind-numbingly dull or fate-alteringly momentous. Person to Person expresses this duh statement with scarcely more wisdom, nuance, or emotional pull.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    The death scenes range from goofy and completely preventable to modestly suspenseful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    Director Laura Gabbert pairs her wide-ranging, blithely fawning approach to Gold with a vision of Los Angeles as blinkered as it is tempting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 65 Inkoo Kang
    Unlike the first half, which felt like a fresh look at Biblical events from an unfamiliar POV, the latter section simply recreates the end of the Gospel of Matthew with little of the urgency or humanity that fueled it before.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The Jesse Owens to cheer on here is, sure, the fastest man in the world, but also the canny would-be celebrity who knew exactly how to bet on himself in a world that had little use for his dignity and intellect. If that’s not an inspirational story, I don’t know what is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Despite arriving a decade too late, there’s a version of the small-town coming-out comedy 4th Man Out...that could feel relevant. But first-time director Andrew Nackman’s emotionally shallow, vaguely misogynistic take isn’t it.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Nearly free of gore, the film taps into the deep and always welcome vein of the opulently bizarre things that rich, emotionally stunted people get into when they’ve got too much money. Stacey Menear’s script is careful and clever about revealing what Brahms really is, for he’s certainly got a mind and will of his own.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    If nothing else, Dirty Grandpa is consistent: it maintains a tone of aggressive charmlessness from start to finish.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    The Masked Saint didn’t screen for critics, but it’s no worse than any other faith-based film, which as a canon tends to sacrifice story for the sermon. A movie that can finally combine the two — now that’d be a miracle worth beholding.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 45 Inkoo Kang
    In terms of anything that has to do with characterization, Chuck Hogan‘s script is punishingly rote. But as bombastic, shoot-‘em-up spectacle, 13 Hours is a visceral, well-paced and often beautiful action-thriller.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Inkoo Kang
    American exceptionalism certainly deserves to be deconstructed, but that can most assuredly be accomplished with a lot more nuance than it is here. As an exercise in liberal self-flagellation, hey, whatever floats your boat. But as a political call-to-arms, I believe in America: We can do better.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    It’s that devotion to truth that makes Son of Saul such a difficult watch — and also one of year’s most important masterpieces.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Inkoo Kang
    Failing almost entirely at amusement, “The Road Chip” may be most useful as a lesson for children to be more discerning about their movie choices.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 95 Inkoo Kang
    Fassbender manages to find the psychological throughline that makes Macbeth’s increasing mental deterioration — a development that can feel overly formalistic, not to mention moralistic — wholly convincing.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 Inkoo Kang
    It’s as punishingly dull as Sunday-school homework — and just as unnecessary.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 65 Inkoo Kang
    #Horror” is fueled by the despairing fear and misanthropy you can only get from reading needlessly malicious Internet comments. But it’s also made with verve, style, and sparing gore by writer-director (and fashion designer) Tara Subkoff.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    First-time helmer Peter Sohn and screenwriter Meg LeFauve (“Inside Out”) have created a fantastic and frequently exhilarating feature that showcases Pixar’s greatest strengths: technical brilliance, emotional texture, crossover appeal, and an impish sense of humor that takes the utmost advantage of the animated form.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Inkoo Kang
    The film’s compassion for everyday Americans...along with its energetic determination to entertain, enlighten, and infuriate make it a laudable surprise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Inkoo Kang
    Timely but dreary and dramatically inept.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 45 Inkoo Kang
    Love feels deeply, but not complexly. Both Murphy and Noé’s sustained sex scenes understand want and need, but there’s little to invest in emotionally.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Inkoo Kang
    "Art Addict” may be encyclopedic, but it’s all-too-rarely insightful.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    Unflinching yet unburdened, Miss You Already is like the best kind of hug: warm, reassuring, cathartic, and a fleeting but vital reminder that there’s at least as much good in the world as there is bad.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 35 Inkoo Kang
    Silicon Valley is built on various inequalities, and, frustratingly, CodeGirl isn’t interested enough in delving into those issues — or the girls determined to overcome them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 85 Inkoo Kang
    The women’s movements are routinely and depressingly ignored by the movies. But Suffragette isn’t just a dutiful corrective, a lid to cover up a gap, but a necessarily distressing exploration of how much a political vanguard will push and endure to set things right — and how fiercely and eagerly a society that’s resistant to change will punish them for it.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 45 Inkoo Kang
    The Last Witch Hunter aims for pulpy, comic-book fun, but it’s never as fleet, funny, or detailed as it needs to be. And if you’re looking for something above middling in terms of plot, characters, world-building, even action sequences, you’ll need to seek it elsewhere.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Larson excels at determined despair, simultaneously evincing vulnerability and fearlessness. It’s an exciting, tour-de-force performance by an actress who announces herself as one of the best of her generation. If only the film around her were as bold.

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