For 344 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Inkoo Kang's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 If Beale Street Could Talk
Lowest review score: 10 Walter: Lessons from the World's Oldest People
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 81 out of 344
344 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    In the movies, love is cheap. It’s everywhere and nowhere, too often reduced to a formula or a reward. Beale Street knows better. It restores to love, romantic and familial, its sanctity—an ambition that makes it one of the most distinctive love stories in recent memory.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    For all its gentle groundedness, a quality that suffuses much of Kore-eda’s work, Shoplifters strenuously resists romanticizing its main characters. Its compassion is more convincing for it. So is its brilliance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Cam
    The wonderfully versatile Brewer, who’s in virtually every scene, pulls off essentially three “characters”: Alice, Alice as Lola, and Bizarro Lola. It’s a bravura performance that flits between several realities while keeping the film grounded as the plot twists make narrative leap after narrative leap.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    As Burning unfolds, it reveals new thematic layers until the film brims with allegorical potential.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Wildlife is a confident and compassionate first film. But with its protagonist mostly relegated to waiting and observing, its main raison d’être is Mulligan’s masterful turn as a thirtysomething woman coldly testing her abilities to see what she’s capable of, while terrified that she won’t be able to provide a good life for her son.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Private Life is certainly very good at shivving its characters at close range and gutting these dyspeptic, privileged white people when they deserve it. Save for Sadie’s charmed fate, I can’t fault Private Life for nailing what it sets out to accomplish. But its cultural narrowness, however well-expounded, also left me wondering about the trials and tribulations of all the other couples in that waiting room long after we’d seen the last of them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Al-Mansour is both a natural and highly imperfect pick to adapt Trisha R. Thomas’ novel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    The second hour, though, strides toward its impressively unstinting resolution with magisterial confidence. With the characters finally stripped of the hardness they’d been forced to wear, their raw selves glisten in the sun until it’s time to wearily tie the carapace back on.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    A Simple Favor reintroduces Lively as a character actress—a sexy, funny, award-worthy revelation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    If Searching prefers to focus on plot mechanics over emotion, it at least makes up for it with minor but significant developments in Asian American representation. Given the predominance of the cultural and generational gap between parents and children in Asian American narratives, from "The Joy Luck Club" to "Master of None," it’s refreshing to see an example of assimilated families, whose numbers will only continue to increase.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    BlacKkKlansman may well be the first film to frame the Trump era as one of regression in response to the progress of the Obama years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    Emotionally layered, culturally specific, and frequently hilarious, Crazy Rich is a transportive delight, with food montages to die for (the film offers a splendid showcase of Singapore’s justly celebrated street-food scene) and a wedding processional so exquisite I started crying at its sheer beauty.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    It’s an important corrective to many contemporary and historical accounts of Hollywood, reinstating the queerness that has too often been straight-washed out of them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Directors Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s smartest tactic — the one that makes McQueen such a pleasure to watch, even for fashion outsiders — is giving viewers a front-row seat to the runway, then letting us judge the designer’s oeuvre for ourselves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The dual portrait that Blindspotting offers is heady and dense and mighty compelling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Sorry to Bother You is so smart and so potent for so long — and so inventive yet thoughtfully measured in its use of the absurd — that the flaws simply give way. You don’t remember the endings of dreams, after all — just the parts that left you in a pool of your own sweat.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The fissure between father and daughter approaches like a snake. It sneaks up on you, then leaves you in paralyzed shock.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Sure, young star Trevor Jackson (“Grown-ish,” “American Crime”) can’t fill O’Neal’s effortlessly dapper, achingly world-weary shoes, and few movie soundtracks can rival Curtis Mayfield’s legendary album for the first “Super Fly.” But this is a remake worthy of its original.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Ocean’s 8 is in many ways a mirror image of its predecessor, but it’s most delightful when it follows its own path toward girly transcendence.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The cast is just as game for the broad humor as it is for the emotional beats; the latter’s familiarity doesn’t detract from its poignancy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    RBG
    Surely Ginsburg is far more interesting than her devotees, her enemies, or this film make her out to be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Inkoo Kang
    I saw Tully twice. After my first screening, I wasn’t sure what to think of the ending. The second time, I was convinced of the film’s brilliance.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The film makes its primary case eloquently and elegiacally: The only thing more lonesome than a cowboy, surveying a land where no one understands him, is that same cowboy without a horse.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    Blockers is about as funny and heartfelt as studio comedies get (which isn’t meant as a backhanded compliment), while smart and insightful enough to double as a guide to raising teenage girls.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Inkoo Kang
    An obligatory setup for a sequel slows down the final moments, but until then, Tomb Raider feels like a perfectly paced trio of espresso shots, with a shot of adrenaline to the heart as a chaser.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    If you don’t mind your movies nasty, brutish, and slight, you couldn’t ask for a more delectable chocolate-covered razor blade.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    Writer-director Hirayanagi runs into a few minor pacing miscalculations, but Oh Lucy!, based on her 2014 short of the same name, is a tense, observant, and heartfelt accomplishment.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Inkoo Kang
    The best surprise in A Fantastic Woman might be how lived-in Marina’s existence feels despite the tenuousness of her housing, her romantic fulfillment, and her legal rights.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    The Chris Hemsworth vehicle is is often hammy, but also wryly funny, breath-stoppingly tense, and uncommonly intelligent. Its January dump is a disservice to a promising debut feature.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Inkoo Kang
    It’s a totally serviceable, if disappointingly uncinematic, film about a singular celebrity.

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