For 136 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jack Kroll's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Days of Heaven
Lowest review score: 30 Author! Author!
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 80 out of 136
  2. Negative: 13 out of 136
136 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    Murphy raw is better than the well-done ego served up in Beverly Hills Cop II. But he's become a brilliant wise guy, unlike his hero Richard Pryor, who can turn profanity into poetry and hipness into humanity. [11 Jan 1988, p.57]
    • Newsweek
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jack Kroll
    Almost certainly Joplin's friends, associates and many of her old fans will accuse The Rose of distortion, sentimentality, vulgarization andother crimes. They will not be entirely wrong, and yet Mark Rydell's film has a certain coarse, splashy integrity. And it has a remarkable, going-all-the-way performance by Bette Midler in her first movie. [12 Nov 1979, p.107]
    • Newsweek
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jack Kroll
    The smartest, sweetest, funniest comedy in many summers. [08 July 1985, p.76]
    • Newsweek
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jack Kroll
    Eating Raoul is only one of the many outrageous things that Paul and Mary Bland do in this outrageous black comedy that's almost certain to be the up-from-underground movie of the year. [11 Oct 1982, p.103]
    • Newsweek
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jack Kroll
    Lowe and Spader are quite good as alter egos of the moral shallows. But the film goes from shallow to callow. Director Curtis Hanson and writer David Koepp have turned out a glossy but hollow film noir that makes virtue and decadence equally vapid. [26 Mar 1990, p.53]
    • Newsweek
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Jack Kroll
    Greystoke is entertaining, intelligent, even touching in its broad-scale treatment of a story that has always provided common ground for children and grown-ups. The main problem with this movie is that it's too short. [26 Mar 1984, p.74]
    • Newsweek
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Jack Kroll
    The film is too dumb to work as patriotic exhortation and too mawkish to work as blood-and-guts exploitation. It's a long commercial in which the Marlboro Man has become the American Guerrilla, with his good buddies, good guns and a bottomless case of Coors. [03 Sep 1984, p.73]
    • Newsweek
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jack Kroll
    At times veering toward the portentous, the film nonetheless has the relentless rhythm of a juggernaut. The acting is first-rate American realism -- gutsy, funny and scary as the occasion demands. [09 June 1986, p.79]
    • Newsweek
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jack Kroll
    This would be acceptable, even powerful, if it were a genuinely tragic vision. But there's no true tragic sense here, not even the effective blend of entertainment and social perception of cop movies like "Serpico" and "The Onion Field." [16 Feb 1981, p.81]
    • Newsweek
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Jack Kroll
    Leonard's tight, vivid brushstrokes have been turned into cinematic graffiti. [6 May 1985, p.73]
    • Newsweek
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Jack Kroll
    There's nothing sadder than a movie that tries to be adorable and isn't. Author! Author! tries so hard that the screen seems to sweat. [05 Jul 1982, p.72]
    • Newsweek
    • 11 Metascore
    • 30 Jack Kroll
    Pseudo-lush but crummy flick. [15 Mar 1982, p.78]
    • Newsweek
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Jack Kroll
    Central America has become a kind of hell on earth, and "Salvador" scorches us with this infernal truth. [17 March 1986, p.81]
    • Newsweek
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jack Kroll
    Matlin's performance in her first major role in her first movie is so good -- sensitive, sharp, funny -- that she's likely to be the first deaf actress to get an Oscar nomination. [20 Oct 1986, p.77]
    • Newsweek
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    A high-gloss, light-fingered flick that deftly picks your pocket of a few bucks and in return slips you two hours of neatly killed time. [30 June 1980, p.62]
    • Newsweek
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Jack Kroll
    Paradise Alley lacks Rocky's primal simplicity: It's a parade of outrageous ploys that come pelting at you from all angles. [13 Nov 1978, p.106]
    • Newsweek
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Jack Kroll
    Looking for Mr. Goodbar could have been just another sensationalist movie version of a shocking best seller. But Richard Brooks has filmed it with power, seriousness and integrity. [24 Oct 1977, p.126]
    • Newsweek
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    The best thing about Black Sunday is its pulsating rhythm of suspense and the glittering texture of details it assembles as it drives its way toward its climax. [04 Apr 1977, p.73]
    • Newsweek
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    Bringing together Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin is a fairly inspired idea. And bringing them together in the same body is like heaping whipped cream atop inspiration. [17 Sep 1984, p.89]
    • Newsweek
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jack Kroll
    The Clan of the Cave Bear is dog. [27 Jan 1986, p.69]
    • Newsweek
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jack Kroll
    Moonraker's only real imaginative surge comes in a rousing pre-credit sequence in which Bond is pushed out of an airplane and survives by deftly sky-diving to a parachutist and swiping his chute. After this, a bizarre blandness takes over. [2 July 1979, p.68]
    • Newsweek
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    An offbeat, engaging little movie about the mad mad world of bodybuilders. [24 Jan 1977, p.61]
    • Newsweek
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Jack Kroll
    This is one of those films where lots of things happen but there's no real excitement. [28 June 1982, p.73B]
    • Newsweek
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    Faye Dunaway's performance has its own Gothic energy and insight. She catches the behavioral details of Joan Crawford--the throaty voice, dropping its "g's" with tough-guy casualness, the Venus' flytrap seductiveness. In her nightly chin strap, her sweat suit as she works out like a fighter, in Irene Sharaff|s brilliant period gowns and rings-of-Saturn hats, Dunaway catches the star's driving ambition, her obsession with a perverse ideal of perfection that turns human feeling into cruelty. She makes Crawford a fearsome portrait of the pathology of stardom. [21 Sept 1981, p.97A]
    • Newsweek
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jack Kroll
    In a way it's silly to review a movie like this; it's like reviewing a case of acne. John G. Avildsen, the checkered-career director who made Rocky, has made this one a kind of Pebbly -- a Rocky for teenychoppers, about a semi-wimpy kid named Daniel (Ralph Macchio) who's constantly being clobbered by the creeps in his high school until he's taught karate by his janitor, Mr. Miyagi (Noriyuki [Pat] Morita). [25 June 1984, p.69]
    • Newsweek
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Jack Kroll
    Lange gets deep into these numbers, the sound and spirit of Patsy seeming to stream through her face, body and hands with the musical equivalent of that hunger for living. Hominy Harmonies: Lange's energy, sensuality and intelligence pump iron into Getchell's script, which doesn't have the bite and color of his "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore." [7 Oct 1985, p.88]
    • Newsweek
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Jack Kroll
    This movie is so angrily honest that it's a bit dotty. But the battles between Turner and Perkins have a real ferocity, and Turner's internal battle between sexual pride and fear is poignant and pertinent. [29 Oct 1984, p.134]
    • Newsweek
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Jack Kroll
    Rohmer, whose films ("Claire's Knee," "My Night at Maud's") are all about desire chilled in the icebox of custom, has brilliantly reproduced the impact of this rationally irrational story: he captures Kleist's almost surreal effect of a grenade whose exploding fragments somehow arrange themselves into a classically formal pattern. [1 Nov 1976, p.83]
    • Newsweek
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Jack Kroll
    Its battle scenes have a raw, gritty power that's closer to an actual documentary than any other Vietnam movie (the director, John Irvin, is an Englishman with an extensive background in documentaries, including ones about Vietnam). But its uncompromising indictment of the antiwar movement back home is much too simplistic and undercuts the film's tremendous momentum as a record of the combat soldiers' hellish ordeal. [14 Sept 1987, p.83]
    • Newsweek
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Jack Kroll
    Whatever it is -- movie, photographed stage show, TV spectacular -- Pirates of Penzance is a happy hybrid. [14 Feb 1983, p.85]
    • Newsweek

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