For 135 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jake Cole's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Dekalog (1988)
Lowest review score: 0 Death Wish
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 62 out of 135
  2. Negative: 56 out of 135
135 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Guy Ritchie’s live-action remake is content to trace the original’s narrative beats with perfunctory indifference.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The film is at its strongest when depicting how Diamantino becomes a tool of politicians hoping to oust Portugal from the EU.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    The film is a reminder of the potential of these films before they became weighed down by blockbuster-ready excesses.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Shazam! sees DC combining the golden-age optimism espoused by Wonder Woman and the jubilant, self-aware silliness of Aquaman into a satisfying whole.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    The film’s open-ended narrative tends to be undermined by the simplicity of its thematic signifiers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    If the film sometimes feels too small in comparison to its predecessors, it manages to make the most of its quietest moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Battle Angel is by some distance the most entertaining of the recent crop of would-be franchise starters, exciting on its own merits while leaving just enough of its world tantalizingly unexplored to actually fuel our interest in wanting to see where its characters go from here.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 12 Jake Cole
    The Mexico of this film is merely a place of abject lawlessness, whose hellishness exists only to stoke our fascination for how the protagonist grows as a person by drawing on her inner strength.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The film’s twist ending exists only to retroactively justify writer-director Steven Knight’s feeble stylistic choices.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The climax’s bizarre left turns culminate in a final image so bewildering that were the film not so relentlessly dour it might have clarified Replicas as an absurdist comedy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    With its fine-tuned comic timing and feeling of constant action, Into the Spider-Verse is downright invigorating, and that’s evident even before it gets to its dazzling, dimensional-colliding climax.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    A Private War ultimately sides with the late journalist’s assertion that the whos and whys of war matter far less in journalism than finding the right human-interest angle to hook an audience.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    One may wish that the entire film had restaged the entirely of Tchaikovsky's ballet rather than reimagine it as an ultimately lifeless epic fantasy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    The anti-P.C. scorn that establishes a white boy's nervous entry into rap gradually becomes a sincere, if hilarious, treatise on the impossibility of reducing art to value judgments.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Wang’s particular skill as a filmmaker is his ability to approach well-worn narrative devices from fresh angles, and here he manages to defend the importance of art, attack the neoliberal devastation of cultural liberalism, and argue for the renewed public commitment to the arts from a wryly comic perspective that eschews sentimentality.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Cole
    Patrick Wang's particular skill as a filmmaker is his ability to approach well-worn narrative devices from fresh angles.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The final act's full-tilt embrace of action effectively undermines Tom Hardy's flashes of actorly idiosyncrasy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    The documentary often struggles to extract deeper thoughts from its subject about her wild career as a pioneering rock feminist.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Roma is autobiography as autocritique, and in exploring a point of view adjacent to his own, Cuarón appears to have rediscovered his identity as a filmmaker.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    The final act of The House with a Clock in Its Walls stumbles between awkward, telegraphed jolts and busy, effects-heavy action, completely losing sight of the trauma and grief that was meant to give the film its emotional core.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Neil Jordan’s deft control of pace and tone elevates Greta past mere gimmickry, resulting in a comic thriller whose goofy humor only compounds its mastery of suspense.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    Peter Farrelly manages to respect the severity of the characters’ social context while ensuring that Green Book never steps outside its protagonists’ relationship, a delicate balancing act that credibly makes a feel-good, effervescent comedy out of its thorny subject matter without ever sanitizing it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Jake Cole
    Vox Lux sets up its main character as a beneficiary of tragedy, opening up a compellingly macabre narrative about how school shootings are becoming so commonplace that they can effectively serve as launchpads for stardom. But that idea goes nowhere, as Vox Lux proceeds to play Celeste's experience in the music industry mostly straight.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Fahrenheit 11/9 represents a sincerely bold attempt to capture the overwhelming civic decay that led to our current political crisis, but Michel Moore’s circus-showman duplicity is as crass and abhorrently self-promoting as that of Donald Trump.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Jonah Hill constantly falls back on providing vague justification for his characters' behaviors, along with spoonfuls of sentiment to let the more dour moments go down easier.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Cole
    Richard E. Grant is captivating on his own, but his rapport with Melissa McCarthy is so effortless that their characters’ conversations offer deeper pleasures than the main plot of the film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Cole
    For all its flaws, Widows is McQueen’s most fascinating, bracing feature to date, a demonstration of the filmmaker embracing his commercial instincts instead of trying to pass them off as weighty and important.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    Peterloo so simply recounts the details of its subject matter that its culminating horror unsettlingly feels like little more than a cathartic inevitability.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Cole
    Olivier Assayas drains the film of the playfulness at its margins, leaving only an esoteric lecture in its place.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Jake Cole
    By treating its main character as exceptional, Yann Demange's film validates the punitive system it seeks to criticize.

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