For 113 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jason Bailey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 If Beale Street Could Talk
Lowest review score: 10 Sextuplets
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 68 out of 113
  2. Negative: 15 out of 113
113 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Jason Bailey
    It’s tempting to take it easy on Alone Together, because harsh criticism feels somewhat cruel – it’s just such a gosh-darned nice movie, about two nice people who meet up and are nice to each other. But this is one tepid piece of work, a story of bland people doing and saying bland things as the world burns around them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Jason Bailey
    Some of Novak’s camera sense, particularly early on, betrays his sitcom roots, and he commits the classic rookie mistake of going on three or so scenes too long, tying up inconsequential loose ends. But he crafts a good mystery, consistently engaging and entertaining, and the thoughtful turns of the last confrontation are sly, smart, and knowing.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jason Bailey
    'Trouble in Mind' barely feels like a movie at all. ... Absent any contemporary reflections by either the subject or outside observers, we’re left with no real idea how anyone feels about Jerry Lee Lewis and his exploits on either side of the camera.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Jason Bailey
    Ambulance is absolutely ridiculous, and undeniably entertaining.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 16 Jason Bailey
    The nicest thing I can say about it is that it’s short.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Jason Bailey
    Ryan Binaco’s screenplay is full of tiny, keenly observed touches, but its greatest virtue is its attitude towards her addictions, the way it occupies her space with her, looking on passively but not judgmentally. It’s a movie that understands the desperation of alcoholism.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Jason Bailey
    Colin West’s Linoleum is the kind of movie that’s all but impossible to review with any specificity, because so much of its achievement lies in its surprises – how it seems to be doing one thing while slyly doing another, without deception, and then revealing its ultimate intentions with grace and style.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 33 Jason Bailey
    I Love My Dad cannot overcome its off-putting premise. Nothing is out of bounds, of course (especially in comedy), but if there’s an approach to make the material palatable, either played straight or broad, it is left undiscovered here.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Jason Bailey
    X
    With its shout-outs to horror classics and juicy pay-offs of its own, X feels like the movie West was born to make.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Jason Bailey
    The jankiness of this structure is a bit much, at least on first viewing, drifting into memoir material for so long that it the picture feeling shapeless for a good long while. But then again, that’s our Linklater, and complaining about narrative aimlessness is kind of like coming out of a Scorsese movie bitching about all the voice-over. It’s a new Linklater, is the point, and that’s good news indeed.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Jason Bailey
    Dog
    Tatum and Carolin might have been capable of the light, personality-driven fluff the trailer promises, but not, ultimately, whatever the hell Dog is trying to deliver.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Jason Bailey
    Soderbergh’s direction is, per usual, tight and efficient (as is his editing – it runs a lean, mean 89 minutes).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 42 Jason Bailey
    A bloodless, musty museum piece stuffed with stars but dull as toast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Jason Bailey
    All in all, Summering is a very nice movie – sweet, affectionate, nostalgic, harmless – so it’s tempting to give it a pass. But “nice” and “compelling,” sadly, are not the same thing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Jason Bailey
    "Nanny" feels less like a misfire than a missed opportunity. Those early scenes are so tightly wound and so beautifully played that by the time Jusu trots out the blood and knives and bathtubs, I wasn’t even sure what movie I was watching anymore.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jason Bailey
    You get a sense of Poehler’s energy in the fast pace and comic timing of film, which moves at a good, precise clip. There’s a lot of material to cover here, some of it overly familiar, but Poehler does it with pizzaz.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jason Bailey
    Their latest fusion of science fiction, character drama, dark comedy, and overwhelming paranoia, Something in the Dirt, feels like their most personal film – and not just because they wear so many hats, directing and writing and producing and editing and starring.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 33 Jason Bailey
    It’s cheap, and crass, and by the conclusion, downright infuriating.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Jason Bailey
    The whole thing moves like a freight train, its 156 minutes passing in barely a breath, and that breakneck pace, combined with the expressionist aesthetic and candy-colored imagery, reminds us that blockbusters don’t have to be these lumbering processions of greyscaled dreck. It’s a rarity, a big-budget holiday movie with style and pizzazz.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Jason Bailey
    There’s not much here for anyone over 10 to focus on, aside from how strange it is that the puppy Clifford looks so much more fake than the giant one.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Jason Bailey
    Tom Hanks is such an avatar for optimism and goodness that the qualities of this character – his heartbreak and vulnerability and resignation to a certain kind of hopelessness – land with greater impact, and he’s so good that when the filmmakers go for the big emotional wallop at the end, they almost pull it off.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 42 Jason Bailey
    The new Slumber Party Massacre feels like the last thing a movie with this title should be: safe.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Jason Bailey
    Even its weakest pieces are still entertaining, and the good stuff is exceptionally so.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Jason Bailey
    Derrickson can build a mood and craft creepy imagery, and he moves his camera with precision. But this feels like a notebook of compelling visual and narrative ideas that never quite fit together, that can’t quite manage to coalesce into coherence.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Jason Bailey
    There are a handful of genuinely chilling compositions, copious buckets of blood, and while I know we’re all tired of throwback synth-heavy scores in horror, this is a pretty good throwback synth-heavy score. Unfortunately, There’s Someone Inside Your House otherwise rarely feels like this is more than a job for hire.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Jason Bailey
    One can’t help coming away with the feeling that if the intelligence and originality of All My Puny Sorrows matched its earnestness, they could’ve really had something here.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Jason Bailey
    Movies like “Earwig” defy criticism or even explanation. ... Lucile Hadžihalilović took a risk by making a movie this peculiar; it feels like the least we can do is take a risk by watching it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Jason Bailey
    The Survivor is occasionally infected by the aridness of the handsome, well-made historical film — it feels old-fashioned, in both the complimentary and pejorative senses. But some of that is purposeful and even a little subversive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Jason Bailey
    Gellar and Goldfine manage the tone expertly, inserting little jolts of humor to keep things from getting too reverent.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Jason Bailey
    McDonagh is such a smart writer that one spends much of the movie waiting for his script to exhibit some awareness of the trope, and to comment on it, but that acknowledgment never arrives – and as a result, this is his thinnest screenplay to date, flimsy enough that, in a lesser actor’s hands, it could really fall apart.

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