Jeremiah Kipp

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For 33 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jeremiah Kipp's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Casablanca
Lowest review score: 25 Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 33
  2. Negative: 3 out of 33
33 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Jeremiah Kipp
    The freewheeling atmosphere of dread more than make up for the incoherence, but Phantasm IV: Oblivion at times feels like an expensive, 35mm home movie made by some kids in their backyard.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    What makes Phantasm special is the way it captures a boy's life in 1978. [Remastered]
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Don Coscarelli outdoes the humor of John Hughes in what feels like a more honest version of the gleeful sadism in Home Alone.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    It is boldly NC-17, but unlike most exploitation cinema, Ferrara can’t seem to help himself from making the film a personal, frightened psychic diary, a pitiful shriek for help, and a powerful statement about how even the damned can achieve a moment of fleeting grace.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Jeremiah Kipp
    The film doesn't so much bring us closer to the serial murderer as it reminds us of our culpability as spectators.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    The film has a peculiar magic to it, and because of its pace the richness of its sense of detail often goes unnoticed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    A stark, eerie and unrelenting parable of dread. There’s a brute force in Night of the Living Dead that catches one in the throat.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    By now, everyone knows what to expect from this kind of movie, but what’s surprising is how the low-budget rawness, cheap film stock bubbling over with grain, and washed-out lighting schemes give the film a kind of base in reality.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Even though we would see more of Jason over the years (first as a zombie, then battling a telekinetic super-girl, taking on Freddy Krueger within his own warped dreams, even hacking teens to bits in outer space), this one certainly felt as if it properly closed out the Friday the 13th series before it devolved into unadulterated camp.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    Dickey taps into that stark mortal terror of abandoning control, where to become a wild man is somehow a form of connection.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Jeremiah Kipp
    The horny teenagers all seem like banal, plastic, eager-to-please refugees from a sitcom, desperately hoping with their every line of dialogue for a canned laugh.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 38 Jeremiah Kipp
    The tone is crude, raunchy, and leering, with kill scenes combined with more nudity than usual; we’re even invited to check out a hot chick’s body after her face has been sliced in half by garden shears.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Though it has the requisite murder every 10 minutes or so (including victims snapped in half and punched through the heart, and a triple decapitation), Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives feels more like a harbinger for the Scream series with its self-aware jokiness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    If you watch Clockwork Orange and see that this is the game Kubrick is playing with us, giving us an avenue into understanding a corrosion of society, the film may be appreciated as his finest masterwork in a career full of them. Certainly, it’s his most human film, right next to Lolita in its refusal to judge its central character’s sickness.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    Add Hepburn’s persona, beautifully explored here in all its wonder, and Stewart’s likeability, and George Cukor’s sensible, subtle, and lovingly unrushed direction of a firecracker script…the result is a studio picture far deeper and richer than its whimsical surface style might lead you to believe.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Jeremiah Kipp
    The exhaustive, labyrinthine narrative is built up like a fortress around this film’s bitter heart.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Suffice to say, this small offering from the horror genre is a hoot to watch, with never a dull moment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Jeremiah Kipp
    Alice, Sweet Alice conflates the angst of adolescent sexual development with the fury of Catholic retribution, suggesting at times an analog version of David Fincher’s Se7en.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Jeremiah Kipp
    It is almost as though these filmmakers are afraid they’ll never get the chance to make another one, and Re-Animator doesn’t hesitate in being an almost operatic, larger than life comedy of splatter. While it paints with a big (red) brush, it is never boring.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Bringing Up Baby has some delightfully comic sequences, for sure. But I’m less inclined to remember the dynamics of the gag than Grant and Hepburn’s timing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Strong performances and a fiery aggressive tone keep things moving, but A Face in the Crowd is dated and not particularly deep.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Poitier’s acting is scalding hot. If The Blackboard Jungle is worth anything, it’s for bearing witness to a major star in the making.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    The Caine Mutiny is not distinctive filmmaking or storytelling, and its idea of ethical debate is relying on familiar archetypes and arguments. It sure is standard, though. It’s like the well-constructed house that’s not meant to be distinctive, but was made to endure.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 63 Jeremiah Kipp
    Only musical theater people will plug into this love-fest, breaking their arms patting themselves on the back. That’s entertainment?
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    At 80 minutes, its cinematic flash fiction, and a suitable entry point into the lively body of work Cassavetes made.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    This isn’t simply another version of the mythologizing tactics that saw Bonnie Parker emulating the flappers from Gold Diggers of 1933 in Bonnie and Clyde. Altman refuses to romanticize his characters’ impressionable innocence, but nor is he resolute to assert cultural impregnability either. Instead, Altman’s emphasis lies in locating the specificities of historical time and understanding how socially constructed mythologies come to proliferate in the first place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Cassavetes didn’t improvise, and Faces was scripted, but many of the film’s scenes still have the feel of conversations happening right in front of you, with all the imperfections and digressions and looseness of the everyday.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Now, Voyager is the stuff of young lovers and hare-brained idealists, and if it can feel pretty foolish at times, it’s unforgettable for how sincere and affectionate it is toward one particularly time-honored cliché: that only fools falls in love.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Though its craft is accomplished, the film never gets deep under one’s skin the way it ought to.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jeremiah Kipp
    Asylum tries telling similar tales (twice) and comes up pathetically short in the scare department, but the atmosphere and theatrics of the Amicus presentation make it a more than worthwhile trip down memory lane for die-hard horror buffs.

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