For 187 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 76% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jim Slotek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Lowest review score: 25 The Darkest Minds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 187
187 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    Its pace, at least in the early going, is breathless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    The odd golfball-centric bit of whimsy aside, The Phantom of the Open is straight-ahead storytelling (complete with a pat family crisis that is neatly resolved) that can only be as good as the actors in it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    Clocking in at under two hours, virtually every word of prosaic bro dialogue, every dramatic exchange, every turn of events, is designed to do one thing: get us back in the sky twisting and turning at several times the speed of sound, narrowly avoiding crashes with other planes and with the ground.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    Director Simon Curtis and writer Julian Fellowes deliver the dual comedies of errors with cheer, sprightly/stately music and the lightest of drama. The scenery, both at Downton and in France, is worthy of Rick Steeves’ Europe. If this is a goodbye (and there are plenty of signals that it is, barring unexpectedly huge box office), it ends on a note of smiles, tears and no hard feelings.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    Producer-director Jonathan Keijser’s debut feature is a fish-out-of-water tale that softens the edges in the story in favour of eccentric character comedy and mild family conflict. Oh, and it does a pretty good job of portraying Antigonish as one icy-cold but warm-hearted town.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness is a mostly joyless exercise whose only saving grace is the mordantly silly touch of director Sam Raimi, who delivers ghouls, demons, necromancy, imaginatively surrealist backdrops and at least one rampaging monster that looks like it escaped from an episode of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. For many, this is entertainment enough.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jim Slotek
    Director Martin Campbell (Casino Royale) seems to be directing by template, never stopping to let us get to know anybody – least of all Neeson’s Alex, who for the most part is only there to kill people. Some things never change.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    The movie is both an exercise in self-mockery and a spoof of both Hollywood and the kind of movie Cage might take to pay the bills.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Jim Slotek
    If cute was the selling point of this spin-off series, it’s practically out of stock in Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore, a movie that has traded in its charm (and, for the most part, its fantastic beasts) for an extended Nazi metaphor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    It’s a fact of life that a novel about the right to die can’t be represented in depth in 105 minutes. But a compelling essence remains in this story about two sisters from a Manitoba Mennonite community - one with a mess of a life who nonetheless wants to live, the other, blessed with a seemingly perfect life, who wants the opposite.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    With DNA largely spliced from the movie Speed, it’s a carnage-filled action film that is essentially a single extended car chase. Ambulance is a movie that is nothing if not focused.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 58 Jim Slotek
    You do get the sense that Swedish director Daniel Espinosa really wanted to make a horror film instead of the usual super-hero origin-story-punctuated-by-carnage.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    There is no pretension in what The Lost City is or what it’s trying to do, other than entertain an audience for slightly under two hours. It has one job, and it does it well.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Jim Slotek
    Despite Oh’s solid fear-filled performance, Amanda’s inevitable possession seems to take forever in an 87-minute movie, and the inevitable maternal-love-powered dispossession seems rushed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    Double Walker’s story is feverishly imaginative, though its internal logic often doesn’t hold up. But the star and co-writer Sylvie Mix is committed to her story, playing a mostly silent, seductive (often nakedly so) phantom who “can only be seen by believers and sinners.”
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Jim Slotek
    An undercooked ‘70s-style blaxploitation revenge fantasy with a reverse-Shyamalan plot (the “twist” is up front), Alice is an objectively bad movie wrapped around one great, all-in performance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    Batman as a straight-ahead film noir anti-hero – just psychos and murder, no end of the world scenarios - is an idea that’s overdue. It was the tone the original comic book set way back when. And for long stretches, The Batman gets it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    The dialogue is clunky at times, and the forced four-narrative format means no character is really fleshed out. But the movie finds its heart and its footing in the last act with Danny’s story and a redemptive finale.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Jim Slotek
    Esthetically perched somewhere between a low-budget TV biopic and a soap opera - with occasional flourishes of bonkers-cheesiness worthy of cult status - Aline is the Celine Dion hagiography no one could have dreamed up except its director.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Jim Slotek
    Oscar-nominated Iranian director Asghar Farhadi (A Separation), with his powerful and perceptive tale A Hero, shows us universalities, from the complexities of human nature to the modernized way we’ve manipulated right and wrong.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    Spider-Man: No Way Home is a comfort-food present to long-time fans, like a cross-over episode of one or more beloved TV series, with winks, call-backs, trivia, cameos, super-villains and copious destruction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Jim Slotek
    This West Side Story retains its ‘50s feel, while polishing this venerable gem of a musical to a greater gleam.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    I was worried King Richard would come to resemble the platitudinous The Pursuit of Happyness, which earned Smith an Oscar nomination, but is not one of my favourites of his films. I was pleasantly surprised thereafter.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Jim Slotek
    The largely interior cinematography by Claire Mathon is stark, cold and beautiful, backed by a soundtrack that ranges from funereal chamber music to discordant jazz-noise meant to inspire dread. If that sounds uncomfortable, well, that’s the point of being her.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    Roh
    Roh is a simple story, fueled entirely by atmosphere.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Jim Slotek
    I’m a fan of Wright’s work, so I’m disappointed that Last Night in Soho doesn’t hold up on both halves. But the parts that work, work terrifically.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    This might be a Dune that could even be appreciated by someone unfamiliar with Dune.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    I’m Your Man is certainly a metaphor for our increasingly intimate relationship with our own technology. Some have seen it as a direct reference to our intimacy with personae on social media, virtual relationships that exist at the expense of our connections with people in the real world. Whatever it is supposed to be, it is a smart and often witty take on a not exactly new sci-fi premise.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Jim Slotek
    If brevity is indeed the soul of wit, at a tidy 90 minutes, Venom: Let There Be Carnage is on point for what it largely is - a violently slapstick domestic sitcom.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Jim Slotek
    An audacious and demented film, tailor-made for its recent Midnight Madness slot at the Toronto International Film Festival, Julia Ducournau’s Titane also has intimations of profundity - quite a claim for a film about a woman who is impregnated by a car.

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