Jocelyn Noveck

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For 97 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jocelyn Noveck's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Tragedy of Macbeth
Lowest review score: 25 Unhinged
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 74 out of 97
  2. Negative: 5 out of 97
97 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    Raiff’s writing and direction keep the action moving crisply, and he knows his world — set not in Dallas but in Livingston, New Jersey — very well.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    Rylance is also one of those few actors who can power an entire film, and The Phantom of the Open definitely rides on the strength of his signature quirky energy as it tells the true-life story of Maurice Flitcroft, a shipyard crane operator from northern England who stunned the golfing world in 1976 by entering the British Open under false pretenses — he’d never played a round of golf — and shooting the worst qualifying round in Open history.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    In the end, “A New Era” is a misnomer of a title — not much has changed, which actually may be the best gift to “Downton” fans. After a tough couple of years, you could do worse than this, the latest in what may end up being a line of sequels as long as the Crawley bloodline.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    Not surprisingly, Carmichael proves a director who is nothing if not confident and comfortable with the UNcomfortable. He keeps the action moving — at a few moments, the film even feels like an action pic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    [Michell] imbues his last film with so much charm, wit and good storytelling that he, too, cannot help but win.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    Cow
    In Arnold’s careful, unhurried hands, it is a sobering lesson, though one without a clear agenda. Arnold simply seems interested in telling us Luma’s story. And that is enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    Memory is selective, memory is jumbled, memory travels in different directions. And so does “Mothering Sunday,” Eva Husson’s affecting and visually pleasing — if languorous — meditation on love and loss, based on a woman’s memory of an impactful day that reverberates through her long life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    Master ultimately suffers the fate of many promising films with many good ideas and not enough time to develop them — some paring down would have improved the latter part of the film.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Jocelyn Noveck
    The question does arise not long into this, the 10th movie in the “Chainsaw” oeuvre: Did we really need another? And sadly, given the lack of imagination, creativity or even basic attention to logic in a perfunctory and downright silly script, the answer seems a resounding “Nope.”
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Jocelyn Noveck
    As for Neeson, what can we say? He could keep doing this ’til he’s 80, but surely there’s something better out there.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Jocelyn Noveck
    If the format of a lecture is inherently limiting, the directors do a superb job of weaving a compelling visual — and emotional — experience.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Jocelyn Noveck
    No matter how cursed or unlucky the so-called “Scottish play” is in theater lore, the stars seem to be aligned here.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Jocelyn Noveck
    Perhaps there’s something in this tale of two women — or really, three — that speaks to all who try to pretend that it’s unnatural to sometimes be ambivalent about motherhood. And that motherhood is not, in ways and at times, a struggle for nearly everyone.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    That the comet is a stand-in for climate change is hardly a secret going into Don’t Look Up, Adam McKay’s exceedingly watchable, funny and star-studded yet somewhat chaotic satire.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    Karam is adapting his own Tony-winning work here, a play inspired by the 2007-2008 financial crisis. In doing so he achieves something quite rare: He makes an intimate and devastating family drama even more intimate and devastating.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    For older viewers, though, it may be hard to ignore some of the clunkier moments of a script that, in trying to update a story created in 1963, gets in its own way with dialogue that while sometimes funny and sweet, can be awkward and occasionally even off-key.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Jocelyn Noveck
    Rarely have the hues of black and white, cinematographically speaking, looked so beautifully lush as in Passing, the hugely impressive directorial debut of actor Rebecca Hall.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    The violence is expertly choreographed, but some of us surely could have done with less bloodshed (there are Tarantino-esque flourishes here, too) and more dialogue to deepen some of the tantalizing relationships Samuel introduces.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    Whatever your level of familiarity, Haynes’ doc — the first for this accomplished director — is so stylistically compelling, it doesn’t really matter what you knew coming in.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    Writer-directors Aron Gaudet and Gita Pullapilly offer up a commentary on the value of work. There’s a critique of capitalism, and an intriguing buddy relationship between two women with very different lives but shared goals.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    A feminist recasting of the familiar story is welcome, of course, but the screenplay focuses so insistently on its female-empowering message that it feels at times like we’re just getting hit over the head with it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Jocelyn Noveck
    Heder, who adapted her screenplay from the 2014 French film La Famille Belier, makes crucially effective decisions throughout, but none more important than the casting, with three extraordinary deaf actors playing the deaf family members.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    Old
    Of course, it all comes down to a Shyamalan-style final twist — the most entertaining part of the film, but it comes way, way too late. Listen, we’re all up for some summer fun on the beach. But by the time we’re allowed in on the secret here, we’re feeling a bit tired.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    One cannot fault Roadrunner for not coming up with clear answers. There rarely are clear answers, anyway, and this film seems to want to be about a life, not a death. A fascinating life, parts of which will forever remain unknown.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    Luckily, Neeson has a way of lending his rough-hewn dignity to even the most perfunctory of plots — because this one, it must be said, is perfunctory.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Jocelyn Noveck
    All characters are beautifully cast, but a standout is Hawkins, who has the soulful voice of a young Christopher Jackson (the original Benny, who has a cameo here) and charisma that burns through the screen.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Jocelyn Noveck
    Stone is always compelling, and with an ace nemesis in Thompson, she’s having a blast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    A well-cast and often entertaining but campy and sometimes obvious thriller starring Amanda Seyfried and James Norton.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Jocelyn Noveck
    Monday has an artsy, improvised feel, but also falls prey to some pretty standard rom-com tropes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Jocelyn Noveck
    Concrete Cowboy, an impressive debut by writer-director Ricky Staub that overcomes formulaic dialogue and we-saw-that-coming plot twists with its sheer heart, is based on a novel, Ghetto Cowboy by Gregory Neri.

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