Johanna Steinmetz

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For 48 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Johanna Steinmetz's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Brother's Keeper
Lowest review score: 25 Loverboy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 48
  2. Negative: 15 out of 48
48 movie reviews
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    Add the American work ethic to an Italian bedroom farce, give it to a director reknowned for small, natural, gently humorous films, and you come up with Loverboy, a comedy that is more often distasteful than funny. [2 May 1989, p.7C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    But while Downey is up to the material, and then some, the material is not up to him. The film plods along with the sort of creaky literalism that blunts its attempts at other-worldliness. It says something that Elisabeth Shue, in a bit part as Downey's frustrated girlfriend, has more presence than anyone else in the movie. Her sphere of real time and space is credible; the fantasy world the film attempts to create is not. [13 Aug 1993, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Johanna Steinmetz
    Shapiro has constructed a by-the-numbers script that telegraphs every plot twist with the exertion of its setups. We know that a hive of yellow jackets in the orchard, a carousel in the attic and Darian's fondness for horses will somehow make it into the final minutes of the film. It is hard to work up the curiosity to stick it out and find out how. [6 Apr 1993, p.7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    Stone Cold has a basic proficiency, despite some notably awkward edits. Director Craig Baxley paces the story well, and Walter Doniger's script follows the classic formula for the genre: the more evil the villains, the greater hero the star and the more justified the film's gore. [20 May 1991, p.4C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    Pyun obviously enjoys filming Armageddon, and Cyborg is visually interesting even at its most preposterous. Everything is in ruins, with enough scenes in burnt-out factories to give new meaning to the term "loft living." Still, the plot is hopelessly confused, there are cuts that don't match and scenes that move suddenly from full sun to late afternoon. [07 Apr 1989, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    The ability to subjugate everything to the story is both Avildsen's strength and his weakness. Lean on Me, with its warts-and-all hero, its driving rhythm, its carefully calibrated climaxes, is a finely tuned machine. It also happens to be a steamroller. [3 March 1989, p.Q]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    While entertaining and often genuinely frightening, thanks to a remorsefully blue cast to the cinematography, this thick stew can be tough to swallow under Tony Maylam's bumpy direction. [3 May 1992, p.C7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    A rash and prurient tale, full of the sort of stylish venom that could almost elevate it to artful kitsch. Almost. [29 May 1992, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Johanna Steinmetz
    One might wish - fleetingly - that Parents were a cuddlier film, if for no other reason than it deserves to be seen by the same numbers that flock to such inanities as "Working Girl." Instead, it is uncompromising in its mordant humor, part of an international trend towards uncomfortable, deeply satirical comedy that includes David Lynch's "Blue Velvet," Pedro Almodovar's "Matador" and Colin Gregg's "We Think the World of You." [7 Apr 1989, p.F]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    It takes a while to get used to Mick Jagger as a paid predator, wearing a goofy helmet and spouting lines like, "Get the meat!" But by the end of Freejack, a fairly silly new sci-fi action thriller, rock star Jagger has made the role his own. [20 Jan 1982, p.C7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Johanna Steinmetz
    In Madhouse, writer-director Tom Ropelewski doesn't so much serve up an idea as force-feed it down our gullets. It takes a game bird to sit through the entire movie. [16 Feb 1990, p.K]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 47 Metascore
    • 88 Johanna Steinmetz
    As directed by the Briton Mike Figgis ("Stormy Monday"), "Mr. Jones" is a muscular sort of movie, imposing action on characters who are feeling much but actually doing very little. Figgis' constant camera cuts are almost as animated, as jazzy, as Jones' highs. The director shows a daring sense of rhythm in his edits and, for this story, anyway, it works. [8 Oct 1993, p.D]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Johanna Steinmetz
    Erotically charged American films invariably are spiked with criminal danger. So "The Lover" - a movie about a young French girl's sexual awakening in colonial Vietnam that relies entirely on cinematic effects to evoke the sensuality of its time, place and events - is refreshing evidence that we don't need fear to trigger arousal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    A play based on the most delicately nuanced interactions inevitably loses electricity as a movie. Worse, it becomes predictable. [28 Apr 1989, p.L]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    Though it does know how to hammer home a point, Hardware doesn't always have matching nuts and bolts. It has an anarchic quality, a jolting, disorienting rhythm that makes us unsure of time frame in certain stretches and of motivation in others. [14 Sep 1990, p.I]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    It helps if you think of "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" as sort of a "Sesame Street" for teens. Beneath the self-aggrandizing plot, the rock music, the dudespeak and the humor lurks a smattering of knowledge. The premise is spectacularly silly, but harmless. Bill and Ted are a couple of woolly-brained teens who spend so much time dreaming about the rock band they're going to start that they are about to disqualify themselves from a public education. [20 Feb 1989, p.7]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    Veteran director Arthur Hiller keeps the vehicle galloping along with a sure hand, careful not to let any of it sink to a fatal level of believability and always on the prowl for whatever wit can be harvested from any gizmo at hand. [17 Aug 1990, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    Son-In-Law is a comedy that outstrips its aspirations. It could so easily be a movie you're embarrassed to be caught laughing at. [2 July 1993, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    Despite its title and promotion suggesting explosive action, Boiling Point is an almost leisurely thriller. It has less to do with Wesley Snipes' inner roilings than with writer-director James B. Harris' cool, sardonic view of criminology. [21 Apr 1993, p.C3]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Johanna Steinmetz
    As directed by Robert Mulligan, the stately pace here feels sluggish and the music is no elegiac Pachelbel's "Canon" but a medley of dreadful cocktail lounge piano and swooning strings. [21 Oct 1988, p.G]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    Pirates is tedious round after tedious round of mutiny and rescue. Screen people are hanged and stabbed and garroted with great care, but there's nothing to put the audience out of its misery. [22 July 1986, p.5C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    The Joy Luck Club may be stylistically rickety, but Wang does a good job with the logistics of the movie, integrating multiple time periods, dialogue in two languages (English and Mandarin), two locations (San Francisco and China) and overlapping casts - several characters require two and even three actors to play them at different ages - to make a watchable whole. This is not a movie to be watched lackadaisically. Blink twice and you could lose the train of narration. [17 Sept 1993, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Johanna Steinmetz
    It's basically an anger film, a catharsis for problems we haven't learned to solve. As that, it does its job well, with humor and surprising grace. [18 Sep 1987, p.18]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Johanna Steinmetz
    Scheinman, whose long list of producer credits includes Stand by Me and Misery, makes his directing debut with a good sense of storytelling and a low-key comic style all too often absent in this kind of entertainment. [30 Jun 1994, p.28]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 53 Metascore
    • 88 Johanna Steinmetz
    A scintillating thriller in which writer/director Gary Sherman takes some familiar sitcom elements and force-marches them in an unexpected and terrifying direction. [11 May 1990, p.D]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 27 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    Who's That Girl? is sunny and harmless. Perhaps it's indicative that feminist hostility is taking a milder turn. Or perhaps the genre has gone Hollywood. [09 Aug 1987, p.6C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Johanna Steinmetz
    The setup is so startlingly unlike the rest of True Colors, so moody and visually ambiguous, that it hits you both with the force of the moment and with regret for what this movie might have been. [05 Apr 1991, p.D]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    Mayall`s hyper portrayal of Fred, while psychologically sound, is dramatically torture.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Johanna Steinmetz
    So the bad news about The Men's Club is that it leans heavily on cliche; the good news is that it treats the cliche with elan and it doesn't waste a splendid cast. [24 Sept 1986, p.4C]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 43 Metascore
    • 25 Johanna Steinmetz
    Hocus Pocus is harmless, but it's about as much fun as celebrating Mardi Gras under the influence of candy corn. Director Kenny Ortega ("Newsies") keeps the material moving, but he seems to have no idea how to shape its odd mixture of lugubriousness, sentimentality and goofiness.

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