John Anderson

Select another critic »
For 379 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Maiden
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Like the Holidays
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 37 out of 379
379 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    It’s a gripping historical document, regardless of where one stands on the central argument.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Smartly directed, deftly edited, with a cast of performers who all get a chance to show what they can do.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Top Gun: Maverick is not a dislikable movie, by any means: The cast is charming, the military stuff is convincing, the action sequences are, as intended, pretty astounding: In the proper theater (I saw it in IMAX) it will be a physical experience, literally, one that may lead to armrests being shredded by white-knuckling audiences in cinemas all over the world. But it’s also a little depressing, because of where it says movies are going, what it says about the lack of creativity making its way on screen, and what a precarious balance movie theaters are in.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Alternately inspiring and dismaying—why is the large, affable Mr. Andrés filling this global vacuum of governmental response?—the movie is also informative, engaging and reads like an application for the Nobel Peace Prize.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    18 1/2 — with a title aimed at fans of both Rose Mary Woods and Federico Fellini— then proceeds to go off the comedic rails.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    The Found Footage Phenomenon, while long-winded, offers a knowledgeable take on what makes the difference.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Hold Your Fire is a bona-fide thriller, its elements in delicate balance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    There’s so much going on that one loses track of how inane so much of it is, but “A New Era” is also a pleasure, guilty or otherwise: Mr. Fellowes doesn’t go very deeply into any character, his frictionless repartee gliding by.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    It’s a deranged story, one that offers all kinds of opportunities for examining changes in the state of artificial insemination, medical ethics, the ways in which the human body has been opened up like an evidence locker, and the catchup that legislation has to play with technology.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    An uneven but likable horror film with one of the better plot twists in recent memory.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    It’s largely a two-character drama with two capable actors, though neither Mr. Teague nor Ms. Richardson (who is usually quite good) are given much with which to win our sympathy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    The attitude of Mr. Navalny and his colleagues is fearless, in a country governed by fear. Thrillers are rarely so inspiring.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    There’s no glory in the pugilism of The Survivor, save for the last, exquisite shot of Haft in his Marciano fight, which is alarmingly beautiful, a catharsis for Haft and a moment of aesthetic delirium for the viewer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    Funny, wry, emotionally potent, and like most films by Hirokazu Kore -eda (“Shoplifters,” “Nobody Knows,” “After Life”) operates on multiple levels—usually some kind of domestic tragicomedy under which lies profound existential disquiet.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    A romance, bromance and good-natured send-up of teenage obsession.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    Ms. Leo is in the kind of role that befits her particular gifts—a character overwhelmed by her own emotions, who sucks the air out of whatever room she finds herself in. But Measure of Revenge moves with too much trepidation—or too much style, one might say—for a convincing urban thriller.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    What’s lovely about The Adam Project is its treatment of grief, the love between mothers and sons and, to a slightly lesser extent, fathers and sons.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    As noted in the thoroughly entertaining Oscar Peterson : Black + White, the jazz giant never seemed to struggle, not musically: He arrived on the scene “fully formed,” someone notes, a technical wonder, a master of swing who reigned over the jazz keyboard for 60 years.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    There are a few charming moments between Ms. Lopez and Mr. Wilson that prove beyond doubt that their characters are too intelligent to be in this movie. And yet, here we are.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 John Anderson
    There are a few characters and storylines that aren’t quite resolved, but the essentials—notably, what launched Mickey into a life of crime—are wrapped up in a way that should mollify a viewership left hanging when the show was so abruptly assassinated.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 John Anderson
    Generic booze is, in its way, a shortcut, something pretending to be something else—something achieved through time, effort and expense. As such, it’s not a bad analogy for this movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 John Anderson
    [A] moving and poetic documentary portrait.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Ms. McDonald resorts to some rather standard practices—fleeting graphics, subtitles and numbers—but the strength of the movie is its interviewees, including journalists Joe Castaldo, Alexandra Posadzki (“There was no plan. Why was there no plan?”) and Amy Castor, as well as Taylor Monahan of the crypto service MyCrypto.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    The actor and his director may be addressing the oldest subject in drama. But they manage to give it a new twist nonetheless.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 John Anderson
    Those robots have read our emotional programming, Arthur says, and know exactly how and why we’ll do what we do. Which is more than one can say for viewers of Mother/Android, who will find the robot rebellion more plausible than the human behavior.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 John Anderson
    Middleton and Spinney are all about the medium’s first megawatt celebrity, who is a slippery enough subject all by himself, one treated here with affection, intelligence and an unadoring tone that’s intriguing all by itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    It’s also a film made by her grieving husband. On paper, it shouldn’t work at all. It works measurably better on screen.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 John Anderson
    There’s a lot going on and somehow not enough, because the emotional destination is so obvious, the tone so wearying and the performances, mostly, so stilted. The fight scenes, it must be said, are electrifying, especially the climactic battle.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 John Anderson
    It might have taken one actress to make a movie so reliant on others. It certainly took a director with a supreme confidence, not just in the talents of her performers but in the power of gesture.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 John Anderson
    Among the charms of Finch is its willingness not to overexplain, trusting our patience while involving us visually.

Top Trailers