John J. O'Connor

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For 65 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

John J. O'Connor's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Kids in the Hall: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 Full House: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 65
  2. Negative: 3 out of 65
65 tv reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Absolutely Fabulous is grandly bawdy and uninhibited; Cybill, more restrained for American sensibilities, ends up too often being only vulgar. Still, Ms. Shepherd and Ms. Baranski have their delightful moments. And the series appears to be getting stronger.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Not taking itself very seriously, Murder, She Wrote is a pleasant, almost old-fashioned entertainment, and it does not require a single screeching car chase.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    The cast is pleasant enough. The rest depends on how cleverly Gary David Goldberg, the creator and producer of the series, can bring a sense of freshness to an overworked device.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 John J. O'Connor
    An excessively manic laughtrack is supplied to mark off the points of supposedly irresistible mirth. Each vignette has its own separate writer and director, and that may account for a certain lumpiness of execution in the dreadful porridge of a conception.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    At times the pop-culture references threaten to turn into a Dennis Miller routine, grabbing everything from the Rolling Stones to the Menendez brothers.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    This television production leaves the movie in the dust...Mr. King's script and the direction of Mick Garris (''Stephen King's 'The Stand' '') slowly and skillfully bring The Shining to a pitch of screeching horror. Mr. Weber, shucking the light comedy of sitcom, is chillingly effective as a man battling his own personal demons.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    The result, featuring a strong cast, is far better than any adaptation so far of a King book...The special effects are exceptionally effective. If you're pining for a good creepy-crawly scare, don't miss it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Clearly, there are snakes in this fountain. And "Golden Years" promises to have a grand old time, in a fingernail-biting sense, trying to banish them. With the statue of the Blessed Virgin prominently on Harlan's mantelpiece, Mr. King is characteristically likely to find religious significance in all of this.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    We are in archetypal King territory. The formula is wearing thin, but this adaptation by Lawrence D. Cohen ("Carrie") manages to squeeze out a respectable quota of creepy chills. Heading a strong cast are Jimmy Smits and Marg Helgenberger as a man and wife heading for an explosive separation. She gets the dog.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 John J. O'Connor
    The two-part film is dotted with clever tensions and neat touches, not least a drinks trolley eerily rolling down the aisle of the near-empty plane. But the inflated story goes fairly predictable in a hurry, and the underlining is heavyhanded.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    But score a couple of solid hits for the good folks. Ray Walston is crustily effective as an elderly artist. And in the movie's most tender relationship, Rob Lowe, whose character can neither hear nor speak, and Bill Fagerbakke, as a mildly retarded Li'l Abner-type country boy, are outstanding.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    The style and humor in these romps is generally broad. When the corrupt sheriff of monarchical America goes on television to hoodwink the citizens yet again, he assures them: "I feel your pain. Let us create a kinder and gentler nation." No contemporary cliche goes unscathed in this often inventive but sometimes tiresome concoction.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 John J. O'Connor
    Ham performances seem to be encouraged, perhaps as a means of keeping viewers puzzled in lieu of being enthralled.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 John J. O'Connor
    Chris Keyser and Amy Lippman, former writers and executive producers on NBC's "Sisters," manage to transcend an off-putting concept by making their young characters quite credible and likable as they encounter the obstacles of growing up...The cast is exceptionally attractive; the characters are unusually affecting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    If the acting can get to a level above a robotic stiffness that recalls old Saturday-matinee movie serials, Babylon 5 could prove fun to have around.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    Even a hobbled rendering of And the Band Plays On adds up to tough and uncommonly courageous television. Excessive tinkering has left the pacing of the film sluggish in spots, but the story is never less than compelling.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    One of the better [of the season's family sitcoms], simply because it's kind of cute and a bit offbeat.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    The title role is filled quite solidly by John Wesley Shipp, who has won Emmy Awards for his work in the daytime soaps ''As the World Turns'' and ''Santa Barbara.''
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 John J. O'Connor
    Coach is painlessly affable. Mr. Nelson, departing from his customary serious roles, reveals a nice sense of comic timing. The only thing missing is a smidgin of originality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    The title role of the hourlong show is played with insinuating relish by Avery Brooks. ... Now the series ... has to find some scripts worthy of the character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 John J. O'Connor
    Mr. Urich is the perfect television-series star, appealing without being overwhelming or threatening.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    When it's bad, it's incredibly embarrassing. But then when it's good, it's terrifically on target.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Although off to a sluggish start, Brewster Place represents an Olympics-sized leap in prime-time programming.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    This is an impressive production. The cast is generally quite good; Ms. Martin is extraordinary, making Christy's fresh-faced innocence utterly captivating on these beautiful and sometimes dangerous mountains.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 John J. O'Connor
    The plot of "House of Cards" requires more than just a couple suspensions of disbelief. Seemingly perceptive characters turn inexplicably naive. The obvious is overlooked just a bit too frequently. But, directed by Paul Seed, the production moves ahead briskly, and as the story turns more and more vicious, the timely potboiler becomes surprisingly compelling. Much of the credit belongs to Ian Richardson's scarily perfect performance as Francis Urquhart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 John J. O'Connor
    The madcap humor of the television version begins to wear noticeably thin halfway through the first hour.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 John J. O'Connor
    Initial verdict: clunky.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 John J. O'Connor
    Now, done up by Mort Lachman, Sy Rosen and Zev Braun as a typical sitcom, it has become a vehicle for wisecracks and a soundtrack that goes "aaahhh" whenever the camera focuses on a cute infant.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 John J. O'Connor
    Everybody, though, is well meaning and enormously attractive. Even Damone, banned from Disneyland, dressed like a rummage sale and generally recognized as the school sleaze, is basically likable. That is what makes the show moderately interesting. It might also be noted that there is no laugh track. That makes Fast Times almost courageous.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 John J. O'Connor
    Ms. Hardin is appealing but a bit lumpish in the dance scenes. Mr. Cassidy, looking as if he has just spent hours pumping iron, bumps, grinds and gyrates with all the sexual steaminess the producers are clearly seeking. Can Johnny and Baby keep this misbegotten romance simmering for a few weeks, never mind a full season? Can enough dirty dancing be squeezed into future half-hour episodes to maintain the mambo momentum? I doubt it.

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