For 59 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 28% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jon Frosch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 90 Non-Fiction
Lowest review score: 20 The Only Living Boy in New York
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 59
  2. Negative: 10 out of 59
59 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    A twisted tale of toxic female friendship, the film offers its share of pleasures: eye candy in human, sartorial and real-estate form, as well as the unmistakable flair of a director and performers who know their way around a piece of pop entertainment. But the result leaves you scratching your head.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    There are chuckles and even guffaws throughout, though the comedy is streaked with despair, and also great tenderness. It’s the latest evidence of the director’s gift for tackling grave subjects with the lightest of touches; the film flows airily along, then knocks you off-balance with the weight of its insights and implications.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Tag
    Tag is neither bad nor good, but rather, despite its out-there story, almost numbingly ordinary: an easy, breezy action-com that’s sometimes amusing but rarely funny, competent rather than inspired.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    While it has visual energy to spare, the movie is more relaxed and less flamboyantly playful than most of Honore’s other films, unfolding with naturalistic grace — precise but unfussy framing, fluid camera movements — and fewer New Wave-y winks and nods.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    A pleasingly quiet, small-scaled drama about love between strangers and siblings, solidarity between lonely Angelenos and the transformative power of kindness, Anything has much to recommend it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jon Frosch
    The movie is stuffed with talent and buffed with hipster-indie polish. It’s also frequently silly, only fitfully involving and often surprisingly banal despite its outré premise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    Like a bomb ticking away toward detonation, Glenn Close commands the center of The Wife: still, formidable and impossible to look away from.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Jon Frosch
    What stays with you is Jacobson’s grippingly understated lead turn, which promises a fruitful screen life beyond Broad City.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    It’s an expertly carved chunk of cheese. But taken on its own, limited terms, Love, Simon is also a charmer — warm, often funny and gently touching, tickling rather than pummeling your tear ducts.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    There are chuckles here and there, but a striking absence of belly laughs; Girls Trip it’s decidedly not.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Sluggish and somber, with nary a wink, chuckle or sigh of relief to mitigate the misery, the film is a slog. That's unfortunate, because the writer-directors have a strong visual sense, and, in Wood, a magnetic lead.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    With an attention-grabbing hook and two riveting central performances, Jennifer Gerber's feature directorial debut The Revival holds you in its grip even when it stumbles
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Blame essentially flirts with one set of clichés only to settle down with another. But it has the merit of at least striving for the substantive (the agonies of teenage girlhood) over the merely titillating (transgressive sex).
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Jon Frosch
    With brilliant comedians like Hahn and new addition Christine Baranski on board, there are line readings that pop and jokes that land.... But A Bad Moms Christmas is louder, busier and more pandering than the original — an exhausting spectacle of skilled performers gamely mugging their way through a cash grab.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Brad's Status is good enough to make you wish it were even better: tighter, bolder, sharper. But it's a droll, affecting movie — and, in its exploration of a man's fantasies of success and fears of failure, his trudge through the weeds of pessimism toward optimism, a distinctly American one.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Jon Frosch
    Flatly staged, patchily acted and hobbled by a script (by Meyers-Shyer) that substitutes strained cuteness for wit and texture, Home Again is like a feature-length sitcom sans laughs.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Jon Frosch
    While The Only Living Boy in New York looks nice (it was shot on film by veteran DP Stuart Dryburgh), it's an unabashed fake — glib and movie-ish in a grating way, with lots of prefab "soulfulness" and none of the texture or rough edges of life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    For all its potential, the movie ultimately feels like a frustrating miscalculation; the ingredients are there — it's the recipe that's off.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Its tale of doubles, deception and desire allows Ozon to fool around with some of his favorite themes — the turbulent inner lives of complex women, the distance between appearance and reality, the essential unknowability of even our most intimate loved ones, the necessity of imagination in enduring everyday life.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jon Frosch
    Schumer and Hawn know what funny looks and sounds like, and they lend their dialogue and gags — no matter how tepid — enough snap and personality to distract you, at least some of the time, from the utter laziness of the material.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    The Ticket is underwhelming in several ways, but the performance driving it is magnetic — and helps alleviate some of the bludgeoning obviousness of a morality tale that New York-based Israeli writer-director Ido Fluk hasn’t fully figured out how to tell.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    As with many other portrayals of this ugly period, the movie's central figures and their experiences have been cleansed of complexity, embalmed in a sort of hagiographic glaze that makes even the pain look pretty. Harrowing things happen, but it’s the easiest kind of "tough watch”; we know exactly what we’re supposed to feel and when we’re supposed to feel it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Mixing touchy-feely, sub-Sundance quirk, a studio comedy’s penchant for pratfalls and dick jokes, and unabashed John Hughes nostalgia, the film crowds its leading lady with a busy ensemble and too much plot.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    It’s a quiet drama, full of unspoken hurt and free of histrionics, but it’s as raw and painful as a fresh wound.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Luckily, Elliott succeeds in pulling you into Lee's emotional orbit and holding you there even when the movie falters.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Almost nothing anyone does registers as recognizably human; it’s all just a pretext for yet another round of envelope-pushing outrageousness.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Jon Frosch
    Stale as week-old bread and every bit as bland, the movie saddles a strong cast with a groaningly ineffectual script (courtesy of Michael LeSieur, who wrote 2006’s You, Me and Dupree) and wastes the director’s gift for bringing lived-in charm and feeling to broad comic premises.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Luckily, Blue Jay boasts a handful of fresh, piercingly poignant scenes that cut through the cloud of déjà vu. It also has a not-so-secret weapon in the formidable Paulson, who deserves much of the credit for whatever emotional punch the film delivers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Jon Frosch
    The movie is all tease and no follow-through, letting its story leak out in dribs and drabs that fail to gather any momentum or meaning, let alone mystery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    Fast, full-hearted and graced with a beautifully modulated lead turn by Hailee Steinfeld, the movie takes the risk of playing it straight and sincere — and the risk pays off.

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