For 83 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jon Frosch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Marriage Story
Lowest review score: 20 Get a Job
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 34 out of 83
  2. Negative: 11 out of 83
83 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    Delicate, droll and imbued with a haunting, understated wistfulness, Bergman Island wears its layers so lightly it may take you a while to notice just how much it’s got going on.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jon Frosch
    Writer-director Tyler Riggs’ feature debut has a ripe, palpable sense of place and a pair of magnetic leads in Nisalda Gonzalez and Matthew Leone as the young lovers. All that promise and potential make the film’s eventual surrender to narrative cliché and thematic overreach all the more frustrating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    It's an odd match of a screenplay (adapted by Berman and Pulcini) that's too obvious, telegraphing rather than teasing out its twists, and direction that's overly timid; one gets the sense that the filmmakers are checking off genre tropes and tricks from a list instead of finding ways to invest them with fresh chills or shivers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    If you're going to make a film that sticks to the playbook, or playbooks, this is how to do it: CODA is a radiant, deeply satisfying heartwarmer that more than embraces formula; it locates the pleasure and pureness in it, reminding us of the comforting, even cathartic, gratifications of a feel-good story well told.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Pfeiffer's performance in this uneven but charming adaptation of Patrick deWitt's 2018 novel certainly isn't her subtlest, but it ranks among her most captivatingly Pfeiffer-ian.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    This is an intimate epic, imbued with a warmth and a tenderness that radiate from both behind and in front of the camera.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    Anchoring it all is Sennott, deploying a stealthy, low-key timing that's perfectly suited to a character still struggling to figure out, and get comfortable with, who she is. The actress makes you lean in, her face a frequently blank canvas animated by sporadic squiggles of wit, neediness, resentment and longing that recede almost as soon as they appear.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Much as I admired and was at times stirred by The World to Come, I'm convinced it would be a significantly stronger movie with 75 percent of the narration stripped away.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    It's a confident, enjoyably nasty piece of work, unnerving enough to cure your FOMO about that canceled summer vacation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    The King of Staten Island is nothing if not conventional in its arc and themes, and has some of the usual Apatow aggravations, but it's winning: relaxed, generous, suffused with warmth and a surprisingly delicate sorrow.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Pablo Schreiber and Jena Malone hustle to overcome movie-ish dialogue and clichéd story dynamics, investing their life-bruised characters with authentic feeling. They're enough to make you care about the film — and the people in it — even at its clumsiest.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jon Frosch
    No matter how tongue-in-cheek, and toothless, the film's sardonic view of mental health care feels unfortunately timed given our mass anxiety-inducing current circumstances. The truth is, we could all use some good therapy right about now; Bad Therapy, on the other hand, is not indicated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    This is an imperfect but stirring drama, by turns sweet, sexy and quietly wrenching.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    For all its nasty twists and turns, its fake-outs and flashbacks and pile-up of double-crosses, this story of an elderly con man and the wealthy widow he targets feels fatally devoid of danger. Square, tame and tidy as the London-area house kept by Mirren’s primly elegant, creamy-complexioned septuagenarian, The Good Liar is a work of skill but little spark.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Even when it grows too enamored of its own lyrical driftiness, there’s undeniable skill in Patterson’s use of space, color and sound. The movie might have worked as a mood piece; at times it almost does.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Jon Frosch
    But while the film is effective on its own narrow terms, it lacks the spark of urgency, suppleness of tone and freshness of insight that would make it truly compelling.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Jon Frosch
    Marriage Story puts you through the wringer, but leaves you exhilarated at having witnessed a filmmaker and his actors surpass themselves.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    A relaxed, warmly sensual coming-of-age drama so steeped in ripe South of France flavor — sun, sea, lots of skin and a bit of bling — that you practically want to eat it by the spoonful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    There’s nothing glaringly wrong with the new movie. ... What’s missing is the blazing urgency.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    This is an affecting, admirably disciplined first film, one that patiently enfolds you rather than pandering for your attention.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Plus One is nothing if not formulaic. ... But what Plus One lacks in originality it at least partially makes up for in warmth and watchability.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Jon Frosch
    Bu I, admittedly, had a hard time getting on its woozy wavelength. But The Beach Bum is a work of undeniable commitment and craft — a gonzo picaresque, soaked with booze and filled with gyrating, jiggling flesh, that will play well to the not-negligible segment of the population where cannabis lovers and cinephiles overlap.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    Honey Boy is not a self-justifying cri de coeur or a prankish exercise in narcissism, but a sensitive, sincere portrait of a child actor's dysfunctional upbringing and its devastating fallout.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Jon Frosch
    While the film commits errors of taste and tact, and is generally all over the place from start to finish, those issues come off here as byproducts of a certain generosity — a sense that Anders wants to convey a full range of experience, including the messy stuff in between the usual formulaic notes and beats.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    A twisted tale of toxic female friendship, the film offers its share of pleasures: eye candy in human, sartorial and real-estate form, as well as the unmistakable flair of a director and performers who know their way around a piece of pop entertainment. But the result leaves you scratching your head.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    There are chuckles and even guffaws throughout, though the comedy is streaked with despair, and also great tenderness. It’s the latest evidence of the director’s gift for tackling grave subjects with the lightest of touches; the film flows airily along, then knocks you off-balance with the weight of its insights and implications.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Jon Frosch
    Tag
    Tag is neither bad nor good, but rather, despite its out-there story, almost numbingly ordinary: an easy, breezy action-com that’s sometimes amusing but rarely funny, competent rather than inspired.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Jon Frosch
    While it has visual energy to spare, the movie is more relaxed and less flamboyantly playful than most of Honore’s other films, unfolding with naturalistic grace — precise but unfussy framing, fluid camera movements — and fewer New Wave-y winks and nods.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Jon Frosch
    A pleasingly quiet, small-scaled drama about love between strangers and siblings, solidarity between lonely Angelenos and the transformative power of kindness, Anything has much to recommend it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Jon Frosch
    The movie is stuffed with talent and buffed with hipster-indie polish. It’s also frequently silly, only fitfully involving and often surprisingly banal despite its outré premise.

Top Trailers