Jonathan Romney

Select another critic »
For 76 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Romney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 90 Let the Sunshine In
Lowest review score: 30 Woodshock
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 53 out of 76
  2. Negative: 1 out of 76
76 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    While the film recounts events three decades ago, it couldn’t be more relevant today.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    A film of considerable visual poetry and, at times, grandeur, Our Time is unmistakably the work of the ambitious, visionary director behind Battle In Heaven and Stellet Licht, but as a Bergmanesque drama of emotional anguish, the solemn, militantly downbeat Our Time often makes oppressive viewing and at times struggles to justify its nearly three-hour length.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    There’s a terrific film in here somewhere, with upmarket echoes of the exploitation thriller tradition of the 70s, but it gets lost in overstatement and a surfeit of plot reversals.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Romney
    Vox Lux is intellectually charged spectacle, with one foot in the Euro-art tradition and the other ankle-deep in the pop zeitgeist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    Despite a strong, affecting performance by Willem Dafoe – who, even more than Kirk Douglas or Pialat’s star Jacques Dutronc, looks born to the part – the director’s pugnacious visual and editing style never impart the kinetic emotional charge of his 2007 drama The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    Entertaining and informative as a contextualising accompaniment to Welles’s reconstructed experimental project The Other Side of the Wind...Neville’s film may reveal little that hardcore Wellesians don’t already know. But it offers a lively evocation of the great man’s brilliance, waywardness and pained relationship to Hollywood history.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Romney
    Taken on its own terms as an unashamedly anachronistic attempt to muster the emotional intensity of the Hollywood melodrama tradition, Cooper’s film must be at least grudgingly acknowledged as a success.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    It’s a safe bet that many contemporary viewers will find the film confusing, abrasive, pretentious and antediluvian in its sexual politics. But there’s no denying the audacity of Welles’s undertaking, and of the reconstruction project. What can be said with certainty is that this version of Wind is perplexing, sometimes exhausting but never less than fascinating.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Romney
    While we learn little of interest about Sheeran himself, the film is arguably a thoroughgoing demystification of the industrial process behind the modern pop song.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Romney
    The narrative intricacy is daunting but, for viewers willing to keep track, the pleasure lies in the way that Kitano tracks the moves as they advance to an inexorably logical climax.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Romney
    In the hands of Romain Gavras – music video wiz and maker of 2010’s eccentric Our Day Will Come – and with a mischievously cast giving its best, the result is ebullient enough to feel fresh.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    The film’s energy and passion (and no doubt, eye for detail) can’t be faulted, but a tighter film could have more pointedly made the connection between the subjects’ brief lifespans and the fate of a young culture of refusal that arguably died when the system it questioned was replaced by a differently oppressive social order.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    The Image Book if nothing else, is inestimable, in that it defies normal estimation or assessment; to encounter a film this intransigently confrontational by an artist who shows no sign of softening will be a nightmare for many, but yes, for many a privilege and a pleasure.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Romney
    Beautifully shot, like Rohrwacher’s other features, on Super-16, this film, with its richly textured images, does indeed feel at times like a retrieved and rather miraculous relic from a lost era of cinema, which is not to say that it isn’t of its own moment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Romney
    Like the bullets and bomb blasts that punctuate the narrative, Donbass only sometimes hits its target, but even so, it’s clearly the work of a director with an angry message to get across, in an idiosyncratically caustic way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Romney
    While Higashi proves adept at embodying both extremes, Karata proves a rather insipid centre to the film, not just because of the actress’s bland pertness but because of the passivity of the character.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    You may emerge from Climax, as from a full-on club night, feeling shattered and asking yourself what was the point of it all. But there’s no denying the mastery of Noé and his team, and the extravagant talent of his cast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Romney
    “Surprise and speed is the key,” someone comments at one point; the only surprise is how unspeedy and unsurprising this project turned out to be.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Romney
    Admirers of Soderbergh’s experimental tendency will applaud the film’s execution – it was shot on the iPhone 7 Plus – while this story of a tenacious woman fighting all odds should have added appeal in this #MeToo moment. For a mainstream genre piece, however, the narrative execution is a little too cavalier to guarantee audience satisfaction.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    A characteristically rough-edged work, both visually and in the sound recording, the film eschews aesthetic finesse to follow its multiple characters where situations demand, to strikingly vivid effect.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    Bernhard Keller’s fine photography gives this tense realist drama a streak of no-frills outdoor poetry, without overstressing its genre affinities. A strong cast, grizzled non-professionals in the great neo-realist tradition, are totally convincing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    The sheer energy of the performers, especially an exuberantly funny Mamiya, and the slapstick goofiness of the whole make this an eccentric, hugely enjoyable film - and often, partly because of its relative demureness, a fairly arousing one, with female pleasure and male discomfiture foremost on the menu.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    An oddball hybrid that’s part documentary, part stylistic mish-mash, but wholly celebratory of Mansfield’s often derided ‘blonde bombshell’ image.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Jonathan Romney
    The Holocaust has undergone some awkward treatments on screen before, but one of the most ungainly recent examples must be Andrei Konchalovsky’s Paradise, a well-intentioned but very soft-edged mess of romance, metaphysics and historical theorising.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Romney
    The film’s lavish production values and a comic register more impish than truly acerbic makes this a surprisingly cosy piece of luxury heritage cinema.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Romney
    There’s a thin, and very jagged, line between the radical mosaic approach to editing and narrative of a film like Shane Carruth’s Upstream Color and the impressionistic jigsaw vagueness of Woodshock, which simply seems reluctant to commit itself to mere coherence, as if that simply were too unchic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    The film imaginatively uses a presumably tight budget to claustrophobic advantage.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Romney
    Into what might have been an alienating, hard-edged setting, human warmth comes from some relishably muted performances.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Romney
    Polanski and the supremely genre-savvy Assayas know exactly what they’re doing, and whenever you think you’ve seen it all before, you realise they’re actually doing something else entirely – the film is an expertly navigated maze of misdirection.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Romney
    It’s a dazzlingly executed, hugely enjoyable act of stylistic homage, but also the poignant story of a dysfunctional marriage and an insightful recreation of a critical and contradiction-ridden period of modern French history.

Top Trailers