Jonathan Rosenbaum

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For 1,674 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jonathan Rosenbaum's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Lady Chatterley
Lowest review score: 0 Showgirls
Score distribution:
1674 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This packaged tour through the great man's career is unenlightening and obfuscating, despite an adept lead performance by Robert Downey Jr.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This isn't a major Dante effort, but his ability to make a good-natured satire that allows an audience to read it several ways at once is as strong as ever, and many of the sidelong genre notations are especially funny.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    But the inspirational aspects of the tale--which mainly has to do with the determination of Close to form a vocal orchestra at the camp, despite the class divisions between the women--never quite carry the dramatic impact they're supposed to.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Results are classy entertainment with little to interest women viewers but very shrewdly and cleverly put together, and probably more rewarding in long-range terms if you invest in Fox or Dreamworks than if you actually see the movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This 2002 German documentary (in English) by Marta Kudlacek is the best portrait of an experimental filmmaker that I know.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A few of the bad-taste gags are funny, and Carrey's grimaces have a certain inspired delirium, but this is a long way from the social comedy of Jerry Lewis.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Like most of Lee’s work, this movie bites off a lot more than it can possibly chew, and it bristles with the worst kind of New York provincialism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A rather ho-hum if watchable neo-noir.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The only problem I was faced with was trying to understand what exactly it was that I enjoyed, and how this movie differed from the play I'd read.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    One can have a reasonably amusing time with this predictable sequel, which is a bit longer on action and shorter on wit and character than the original (hence less good, in my opinion), but still diverting and harmless enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Arguably Woody Allen's funniest movie. A riotous object lesson in how much dialogue can transform visuals, and Allen works wonders with it.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The most obnoxious case of masculine swagger since Andrew Dice Clay, with just a tad of Paul Lynde thrown in for spice, Jim Carrey defies you not to bolt for the exit while playing the title hero in this 1994 comic mystery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This curious ecological parable was directed by George Miller (Babe: Pig in the City), who still has an eye and a sense of humor but on this particular outing can't get the script he wrote with three others to make much sense.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Director Jonathan Demme's farcical and broad 1988 comedy, written by Barry Strugatz and Mark R. Burns, doesn't really work, but there are plenty of enjoyable compensations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is a remarkably gripping, suggestive, and inventive piece of storytelling that, like Kubrick's other work, is likely to grow in mystery and intensity over time.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    There's some excellent comedy early on involving the mutual incomprehension of Africans and Americans, though this eventually gives way to solemn, ethnocentric mush about one African's reading of the story of Jesus, demonstrating as usual that sustained subtlety is hardly Spielberg's forte.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    This is hilarious, deadly stuff, sparked by the cynical gusto of the two leads as well as the fascinating technical display of how TV "documentary evidence" can be digitally manufactured inside a studio.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Awkward storytelling and spotty exposition reduce it to a string of rude shocks--not even the eventual denouement provides a lucid enough account of where this is all coming from.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A mixed success, but an exhilarating try.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Everything seems to fall into place according to earlier Egoyan films, which suggests that you're likelier to enjoy this one if you haven't seen the others.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Lacks the scariness, the mystery, and even much of the curiosity of Rivette's better work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Often seems more old-fashioned than modern.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The script by producer David Franzoni, John Logan, and William Nicholson is serviceable but not exactly inspired.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Part of Morton's achievement is to present all four people through the viewpoints of the other three; Wagner can't do that, but the performances are so nuanced that the characters remain multilayered, and they're not the sort of people we're accustomed to finding in commercial films.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    I can't think of a better portrait of contemporary Paris or the zeitgeist of 2001-'04 than Chris Marker's wise and whimsical 58-minute 2004 video...no one can film people in the street better than Marker or combine images with more grace and finesse.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    A very curious and eclectic piece of work--fresh even when it's awkward.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    None of the characters or ideas is allowed to develop beyond its cardboard profile.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    As Dr. Octopus, Alfred Molina makes a more baroque supervillain than Willem Dafoe did as the Green Goblin, but the other stars--seem happy to be giving us more of the same.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Nichols is so astute at directing the actors (who also include Bill Nunn, Donald Moffat, and Nancy Marchand) that it's relatively easy to overlook the yuppie complacency, shameless devices (starting with an adorable puppy), and product plugs (especially Ritz crackers) that undermine the seriousness of the whole project.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Jonathan Rosenbaum
    The results are masterful, admirably unsentimental, and never boring, if also a little stodgy.

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