For 267 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Josh Larsen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Roma
Lowest review score: 25 Swiss Family Robinson
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 267
267 movie reviews
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    The movie manages both senses of scale—the intimate and the expansive—with equal majesty, merging them into something moving, mesmerizing, and poetic, in a way only Lean movies could really manage.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    There is hardly a shot in Orson Welles’ towering achivement that doesn’t employ some sort of ingenious trick involving the camera, editing, sound, staging or production design. Kane didn’t invent all of its techniques, but it’s one of the few pictures I can think of that uses almost every one in the movie playbook. The film is like a dictionary of the cinematic language.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    The original Scared Straight!
    • 98 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Rashomon is a movie of ideas first and foremost. There is little room for subtext here. Matters of truth and human nature are debated in an anguished, grandiose acting style that can be jarring to contemporary, Western eyes.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Playfulness is the defining characteristic of Jules and Jim, even if what it largely entails is a tragic gender gap of fatal proportions.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    A thrilling and infuriating burst of movie id, The Wild Bunch makes you want to slump into the dust and stare dumbly into the distance.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    A Streetcar Named Desire works itself up into a hurricane of emotional chaos, yet ironically, as these final scenes give in to hysteria, Brando starts dialing down. Depending on your reading, that makes Stanley either remorseful or sinister. Either way, he’s riveting. If Brando is calm at the end of Streetcar, that’s because he’s the center of the storm.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Dumbo ends happily enough...but all that comes in a rushed finale; the movie is more interested in capturing the shadings and sounds of sadness (so many scenes take place in the blue night).
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    The only thing I can imagine anyone offering in complaint about Roma is that the movie delivers an uncomplicated depiction of a secular saint. That’s true, to an extent, and yet it’s also what I love about this full-hearted, exquisitely crafted, deeply grateful film.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Perhaps the defining moment of Robert Altman’s legendary career. It was here, after all, where Altman’s signature traits were all assembled and perfected: the extensive ensemble cast, the fluid and unforced narrative, the overlapping dialogue that freed the movies from the stilted patter of the stage and injected them with the interrupted babbling of real conversation.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    The genius is in the way the movie’s little details and character touches lead to an absolutely bonkers climax—after a shocking twist I won’t reveal—that nevertheless feels inevitable.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Haenel, who also appeared in Sciamma’s debut film, Water Lilies, is mesmerizing, conjuring a full person using little more than stillness and a direct stare.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Decades before an apologist Western such as Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves, The Searchers bluntly addressed this country’s racism toward Native Americans by putting one of Hollywood’s most famous faces on it.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Frankenheimer guides all of it with the loopy logic of one of Marco’s nightmares – you’ll certainly never look at ladies’ gardening clubs the same.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Perhaps director Martin Scorsese had to make five other mobster movies before he could make one as wise, reflective, and mournful as The Irishman.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    If Spielberg’s account of the Holocaust is not his greatest movie, it is still the defining moment of his career, the point where his yearning to be taken seriously (The Color Purple, Empire of the Sun) finally fully merged with his filmmaking talents.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Baumbach gets career-best performances from the leads.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    The bold cinematic techniques Welles employed in Citizen Kane are put to even more sophisticated use here.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Shoplifters definitely goes after your heartstrings, yet especially after some third-act revelations put this family in a larger social context, the movie earns any tears it gets.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Nothing that occurs is out of the realm of ordinary experience—there is a wedding, a grandmother’s stroke, money troubles, a funeral—yet it all reverberates with meaning because of the camera’s careful attention and the sensitive performances by every actor in the ensemble cast.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    McCabe & Mrs. Miller is less a deromanticized Western than an emasculated one. It’s a de-pantsing, really, of the strong, silent men who have long dominated the genre. Drop a stronger, louder woman into their midst, and they’re done.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    This is largely another of Malick’s impressionistic tales of paradise lost, but here the dreamy approach feels fresh and exciting.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Directed by Howard Hawks, Rio Bravo has its fair share of gunfights and saloon showdowns (including a bravura opening confrontation that unfolds with barely any words). Yet the film resembles other Westerns less than it does Hawks’ snappy romances, such as Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday, and To Have and Have Not.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Brother’s Keeper is more of a fly on the wall than opportunistic shock doc.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 63 Josh Larsen
    Like An American in Paris, which Vincente Minnelli directed two years earlier, The Band Wagon will either strike you as ebullient and exhilarating or aggressive and overwhelming—in both technique and theme.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Shockingly modern in sensibility, construction, and execution, Brief Encounter is very different from what one thinks of as a David Lean movie, whose historical epics have come to define posh, mid-century, cinematic excellence.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    The incessant, rhythmic swishing of the chain gang’s scythes burrows into your brain – and then adds Newman’s supernova performance. It’s a gulag melodrama, if such a thing is possible.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    If Swing Time isn’t the pinnacle film in the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers partnership, it surely has their pinnacle production number: Never Gonna Dance, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Dorothy Fields.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    At first glance it’s as if the masterful Romanian abortion drama 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days had been remade as a piece of scruffy American neorealism. But then comes The Scene.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Watching The Souvenir is like watching a friend drown, and being unable to help.

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