For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Josh Larsen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Rio Bravo
Lowest review score: 25 Friday the 13th
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 266
266 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Directed by James Whale, The Invisible Man is missing the gothic poeticism of his Frankenstein films, but offers its own sense of unease, especially when the invisible Griffin smashes another cop’s head with a bench. The effects in these trick shots are incredibly sophisticated for the era, as are the moments when Griffin unravels his bandages to reveal … nothing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Director Joe Dante provides a loving, detail-filled snapshot of youthful camaraderie and creativity – I love how their cockpit is a Tilt-A-Whirl – before indulging in the sort of bizarre satire that can be found in most of his films (especially Small Soldiers and Gremlins).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Part post-apocalyptic Western, part midnight motorcycle flick and part Rocky Horror Picture Show, Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior is, when you add it all up, a nutty, B-movie masterpiece.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    The ingeniousness of screenwriter William Goldman and director Alan J. Pakula’s film is that it’s framed as a detective mystery.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    As an adaptation of Great Expectations, this is scattershot and unsatisfying, but as a fever dream you might have after reading it, the movie mesmerizes.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Josh Larsen
    A Woman Under the Influence made me wonder: What’s the point of only showing a mentally challenged character’s distress? Is it fair to reduce Mabel to her rock-bottom experiences?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Nearly every frame of Shaft is intent on doing one thing: establishing its hero – private detective John Shaft – as a powerful, independent, innately good yet still devilish man in complete control of his own destiny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    In a sense, the film only works because, in the real world, the system is rigged against someone like Axel Foley. Yet when Murphy seizes the screen, all bets are off, resulting in a work of racial subversion that’s both hilarious and cathartic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    This is one of [Hitchcock's] significant works, accented by wickedly effective insert shots and a handful of strong performances.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Cooley High has the same youth-movie energy that defines some of the genre’s greats: American Graffiti, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World. All of these films run on the mischievous, unfounded optimism that characterizes our teenage years. They make you nostalgic for naivete.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Writer-director Steve Kloves (who would go on to write the screenplays for all the Harry Potter films) takes three gripping characters who could each anchor their own movie, and crafts a film that honors all of them.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    Playfulness is the defining characteristic of Jules and Jim, even if what it largely entails is a tragic gender gap of fatal proportions.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Garland and Mason don’t exactly generate sparks as a couple, and her histrionics in the dialogue scenes eventually overwhelm the picture. But early on, this has a a lot of Technicolor/CinemaScope magic.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Rather than take a histrionic approach, Lee trusts his four-hour running time, allowing the evidence of governmental indifference and incompetence to quietly pile up until it becomes cumulatively enraging.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    A curious comedy that neither looks back at Rear Window nor ahead to Vertigo, but rather exists in some goofy space all its own. It’s as if Hitchcock went on vacation, but kept working.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Josh Larsen
    The original Scared Straight!
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Josh Larsen
    By the time Streisand takes over the entire movie with the title number, in which the massive waitstaff of an upscale restaurant gathers to sing and dance her praises, I couldn’t help but wonder what all the fuss was about.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    The bold cinematic techniques Welles employed in Citizen Kane are put to even more sophisticated use here.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Deep, dark forests; thorny thickets; spiraling castle stairs – every detail seems to envelop us. And then there is Maleficent, voiced by Eleanor Audley and undoubtedly one of the great Disney villainesses. Her transformation into a roaring dragon in the finale is so triumphant you almost want her to win.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Clearly May is invested in the material — she wrote it — and deserves credit for creating a fruitfully improvisational atmosphere. Yet she doesn’t leave a very distinct signature here, such as the social satire she brought to A New Leaf and The Heartbreak Kid.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    If this works at all it’s because of the sound design: the cacophony of squawks and flapping over the opening credits, followed by incessant tapping, screeching, chirping, fluttering – sometimes in scenes where no birds are present. And then the occasional shock of silence, which is eerier still.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    What Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh did for Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, Burton and Taylor do for Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? They remind us that sometimes writing and directing must simply step aside and concede the power of performance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Josh Larsen
    Director Wayne Wang and his dreadful cast – the performances are almost across-the-board atrocious – had no chance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 25 Josh Larsen
    The deeper American Beauty tries to get, the shallower it reveals itself to be.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    The Shining is terrifying for what it doesn’t do.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Bullitt earned its reputation for Steve McQueen’s lengthy car chase through the hills of San Francisco, and the sequence does have a gritty, low-tech authenticity. Yet there’s more to the movie than squealing wheels.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Bob Fosse’s half-confession about what a jerk he was to the women in his life may pull a lot of punches, but there’s just too much art on the screen to completely disregard the effort.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Josh Larsen
    Rowlands takes the movie by the throat in the dramatic, onstage sequences, just as Brando would have done, yet she’s equally compelling in the film’s smaller moments.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    Gazzara is riveting as man who exudes cool and calm—style—while also stinking of panic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Josh Larsen
    The Long Goodbye is cheeky and often cheerily meta, but I certainly wouldn’t call it a lark.

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