Joshua Rothkopf

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For 1,084 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Joshua Rothkopf's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Lowest review score: 20 The Back-up Plan
Score distribution:
1084 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    Co-scripting with her director, Goth is the standout, displaying a verbal vigor and earthiness she's been unable to tap so far (not even in movies like Nymphomaniac and A Cure for Wellness).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    Give yourself over to the movie's absorbing sense of process and rehearsal, complete with notes of humor that never quite puncture into mockery, and you'll have a better time with it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 42 Joshua Rothkopf
    Even with the original cast on board, there's surprisingly little chemistry or humor, and the movie makes repeated pit stops to stress family values.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    It may not be slavishly devoted to the facts (this isn't your typical birth-to-deather), but as with Todd Haynes's glam fantasia Velvet Goldmine, the movie achieves something trickier and more valuable, mining shocking intimacy from sweeping cultural changes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    Pruning would hamper the unencumbered risk-taking on display, which extends to some atmospheric animation (as it did with Morgen's Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck), and instantly vaults the effort to the top of the Bowie docs. The music itself, gorgeously remixed by Bowie's longtime producer and friend Tony Visconti, has never sounded better or stranger, with isolations of instrumental passages that stick in mind.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    A nuanced exploration of situational ethics tinged with guilt, it's a small, near-perfect New York story.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    X
    For its whole running time, X has ideas on its mind. Like the doubled-edged title itself, both an evocation of the grungy rating this movie might have received in 1979 and something more suggestive ("You've got that X factor," Wayne says of Maxine's allure), it indicates a film that feels unpinned, ominous, and potentially unforgettable.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Joshua Rothkopf
    A remake could have been fun if it had been made with vision, or at least an appreciation of the original. If that's grade-A beef, call this one a rancid veggie burger.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    An extraordinary blend of personal reflection and inspired craft, Flee is a harrowing child’s-eye adventure that lends lyricism to the plight of migrants while showing there’s always a new way to make a documentary.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 33 Joshua Rothkopf
    Mostly, though, as TV newscasters inform us, civilization has taken a serious nosedive — definitely the case when a well-financed Emmerich disaster flick can't even get its dumb-fun groove on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Joshua Rothkopf
    There's a deeper idea here — really! — and it's one that only gets more obvious with time, something to do with arrested boyhood and the gleeful self-ruination of one's own body.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    The movie also gets deeper and more emotional as it goes, becoming a metaphor for restless empathy and non-binary points of view. You Won't Be Alone is a fitting title, bearing the ominous warning of a juicy thriller, but also a subtle sense of compassion. It's a big world and you won't be alone, if you let the witches in.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Joshua Rothkopf
    Doubling down on COVID-era listlessness and QAnon paranoia, the impressively fidgety, crammed-to-bursting Something in the Dirt ends up with something like: Please let my life make sense. It's an understandable wish in an uncertain moment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    Diallo, an inspired stylist with bold things to say, strikes the balance between thrills and ills in a way that's wholly her own.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Joshua Rothkopf
    The romance of the documentary emerges out of its deep, unfaked appreciation for nature: long, uninterrupted stretches where these self-described "weirdos" go off on their own to explore alien worlds like astronauts in their protective gear.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Joshua Rothkopf
    While the new movie is laced with Easter eggs and homages to the late master, it doesn't build its sequences with the same meat-and-potatoes solidity as Craven did. Bettinelli-Olpin and Gillett don't have those chops yet.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Joshua Rothkopf
    Affleck and Clooney make sense as collaborators; both of them became directors to get out of the way of their public images. Hopefully, the next time they decide to work together, they'll lean even further into the intimacies of a setting like the Dickens, a universe unto itself.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    It's a moviegoing experience, sure — and if you need to hear it, one of the best of the year. But it's really a call to compassion, which makes it transcendent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Joshua Rothkopf
    Resurrections does eclipse its predecessors for full-on, kick-you-in-the-heart romance: Reeves and Moss, comfortable with silences, lean into an adult intimacy, so rare in blockbusters, that's more thrilling than any roof jump (though those are pretty terrific too). Their motorbiking through an exploding city, one of them clutching the other, could be the most defiantly sexy scene of a young year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Pig
    Quiet, unforced and delicate, Pig provides a forum for Nicolas Cage, one of our most dazzling showmen, to get serious and burrow more deeply into his talent than he has in years.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Old
    A Twilight Zone–worthy premise, subtly sold by ace make-up effects, makes for a decent-enough thriller, intriguing in the moment but ultimately too timid to say anything meaningful about ageing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Course-correcting to some degree with the return of its most inspired director, Justin Lin’s latest F&F instalment is a little too plastic at times, but back on track.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Cats may flop but it will be found by a likeminded audience, maybe the same one that rescued The Greatest Showman. Don’t be the sourpuss to tell these people they’re wrong.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    It feels like a massive retrenchment—privately, a rebellion seems to have been fought and lost—and only the most loyal fans will be happy about it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Joshua Rothkopf
    Sophia Takal's update of the cult classic turns the real horror of campus assault into a springboard for cheap thrills.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    The material is worthy, but this continuing struggle deserves a more nuanced take.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Joshua Rothkopf
    Ballour’s presence makes Fayyad’s film inspiring, even as we cringe for her safety with every overhead explosion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    But for every Thelma & Louise–like golden-hour drive into the sunset (there are several too many), you wish the movie also had the sophistication to cram from that classic script’s complex sense of injustice, one that had room for a subplot involving a sympathetic lawman. Believe in Matsoukas, though; she’s the real deal and she’ll get better material.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Joshua Rothkopf
    Little Women sometimes plays like a comedy, one that includes a crumpled cry over a bad haircut and several kitchen interludes that feel like Christmas miracles. Yet it’s Alcott’s visionary attitude, well-struck by Gerwig, that stays with you the longest: the loneliness of female liberty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Joshua Rothkopf
    Of course we all hate insidious environmental destruction; it’s valuable to have movies about that. This one works fine enough. But let the other less-talented filmmakers make them.

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