Julie Salamon

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For 95 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Julie Salamon's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Short Cuts
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 3
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 51 out of 95
  2. Negative: 13 out of 95
95 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Julie Salamon
    It's powerful entertainment. [22 Sept 1992, p.A16(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    The movie's considerable emotional force springs from the splendor of its visual poetry. Mr. Bertolucci allows the sweep of 60 years of Chinese history to unfold around Pu Yi as background noise to his peculiar, poignant role in the emergence of modern China. [25 Nov 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    JFK
    It's powerful film making that at the very least accomplishes what Mr. Stone said he set out to do - to offer the world an alternate myth. [20 Dec 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    Matching Danny DeVito and Arnold Schwarzenegger is an amusing conceit played out in an entirely predictable fashion. It certainly isn't harmful, and Mr. Schwarzenegger is kind of cute when he smiles. [8 Dec 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Scorsese has created a Judea that is dusty and harsh, where visions in the middle of a night seem like. Some of the visual compositions are dizzyingly beautiful; the Crucifixion scene couldn't be more masterful, or heartbreaking. [11Aug 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    The movie blurs into a continuum of cars pounding one another and closeups of faces showing disgust, happiness, fear and outrage. It's the kind of shorthand imagery that works best in brief spurts, say, the amount of time it takes for a television commercial to implant a spark-plug brand into your brain. [5 Jul 1990, p.A9]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Julie Salamon
    Extraordinary...The movie has the intensity of an epic, only its subject matter is everyday life. [19 Oct 1993, p.A18(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    The picture sets up high expectations for itself with its wonderful casting, and the actors don't disappoint. [1 Aug 1989, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    The picture's blandness - and hollowness - is startling when you consider the collaborators. [26 Nov 1986]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    With a refreshing absence of earnestness, the movie mainly spins out many variations on a theme: Easy Street begins and ends on Capitol Hill. [03 Dec 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Lyne is able to make things look the way they're supposed to look because he trained in the television-commercial world. But he has a hard time getting beneath the gloss. [17 Sep 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Julie Salamon
    The director Penny Marshall has gone straight to the heart of this complex story and made a powerfully poignant and illuminating film. She doesn't hesitate to push for the grand sentimental moment, but balances the teary stuff with restraint and humor. To be sure, Awakenings seems calculated to induce weeping -- and it does, without making the weeper feel cheap. [20 Dec 1990, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Though not terribly interesting as political philosophy, A Few Good Men makes for a passably entertaining movie. [31 Dec 1992, p.A5(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    Besides engineering top-notch performances from his actors, Mr. Demme also put together a soundtrack that enhances the movie's marvelous, quirky rhythms. He keeps you hooked into this unpredictable, pleasurable picture right through the closing credits. [6 Nov 1986]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 36 Metascore
    • 10 Julie Salamon
    This time Rambo pulls off his superhuman Soviet-blasting stunts in Afghanistan, not quite as late on the scene as he was in Vietnam. Not very exciting; very noisy. [2 Jun 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 76 Metascore
    • 30 Julie Salamon
    By most standards of conventional film narrative, this movie is a mess. [25 June, 1987, p.22(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    Odd as it seems for a film built on such a grand scale, sweet is the operative word here, and that's not meant as an insult. [29 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Julie Salamon
    Mr. Nichols decided to preserve the jokiness of the original material, even while shifting the emphasis to the mother-daughter conflict. There may have been a way to do this and end up with a clever movie, but Mr. Nichols seems to have had an even cleverer idea: He decided to use this movie as a way to pay back social obligations. [13 Sep 1990, p.A14]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Julie Salamon
    A warm-heared picture with some hot dancing, some B movie class consciousness, lots of nostalgia and lots of cliches. [3 Sept 1987, p.17(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 40 Metascore
    • 0 Julie Salamon
    It's all played for giggles, this grim anti-humanism. [21 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Julie Salamon
    A brilliant but completely muddled concoction about the relationship between fantasy and reality. [16 Jul 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    With an edgy, intelligent script by playwright Tom Stoppard, Mr. Spielberg has made an extraordinary film out of Mr. Ballard's extraordinary war experience. [09 Dec 1987]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Julie Salamon
    The movie has its own genuine charm and one hilarious high: Billy Crystal & Carol Kane are simply wonderful. [24 Sept 1987, p.24(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Julie Salamon
    UHF
    UHF, a parody of trash television, is almost defiantly silly, but when it's funny it is very funny. This sloppy, good-natured satire certainly doesn't threaten "Network's" status as the classic decimation of the television business. [27 Jul 1989, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Julie Salamon
    With its breathtaking visual style and careful attention to sound and movement, the movie provokes contemplation about the ways people communicate – through words, through music, through sex, and, most significantly, through touch. [14 Dec 1993, p.A14(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    This clever thriller has the juiced-up, hyperactive feel of a rock video. [07 Mar 1995]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Julie Salamon
    Don't bother to see this film unless you expect to be tested in film class about the Coens' serial dissertation on American cinema. [10 Mar 1994, p.A16]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Julie Salamon
    Persistently upends expectations without insult, as it pulls you into a netherworld filled with yearning, whimsy, and danger. [15 Dec 1992, p.A16(E)]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Julie Salamon
    The strangest thing about his latest picture, Hairspray, is how very sweet and cheerful it is. In his own weird way, Mr. Waters has captured the gleeful garishness of the early '60s, when high-school girls wore demure bows in their ratted hair and deadened their lips with palest pink lip gloss -- and believed that racial harmony was inevitable if teens of all flavors could dance together on TV. [25 Feb 1988, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Julie Salamon
    Maybe the worst part (there's so much to choose from) is the sight of a good actor like Edward Herrmann parading around looking like a demented quarterback, the shoulders of his suit jacket grotesquely padded. Mr. Schumacher has dressed the adorable Corey Haim in even weirder getups, jackets with pastel stripes and little outfits that resemble dresses. The vampires aren't nearly as creepy as those clothes. [6 Aug 1987, p.1]
    • Wall Street Journal

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