For 8 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 25% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kate Erbland's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 83 Prophet's Prey
Lowest review score: 58 Ashby
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 8
  2. Negative: 0 out of 8
8 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 Kate Erbland
    Godmothered has all the pieces for at least an amiable enough production. Instead, the result is a paradoxical combination of sweet messages and dull execution, good-hearted ideas and bizarre subplots, a dull affair that very clearly sprang from a good place.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Sewell’s book has always been a better fit for piecemeal storytelling — the book itself is divided up by Beauty’s owners — and while Avis’ script does keep the relationship between Beauty and Jo at its center, that lends an uneven treatment to many of Beauty’s later adventures.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    The Croods: A New Age ultimately spins that off into a wacky adventure that somehow involves aforementioned punch monkeys (cute, but very punchy indeed), a revelation that the “Croods” franchise might intersect with the world of “Mad Max,” and a generous dash of female empowerment (plus awesome fake heavy-metal music to go with it). It’s a little silly, very colorful, and entertaining enough to deliver some good-hearted ideas that aren’t beholden to any period in time. Worth nearly a decade of push-pull to get here? Probably not, but on its own merits it’s a charming throwback — not necessarily a “new age,” but the remnants of a classic one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    The film’s predictable plotting is delivered via a nearly lethal combination of obvious twists and a series of face-offs that would be compelling, if not for the exposition-heavy conversations that take place in between the physical brutality.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Kate Erbland
    While the premise of Chick Fight may be featherweight, it’s the film’s phony feminist execution that turns it into a real loser.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    The drama ramps up to a satisfying final act, and while Winocour and Green don’t splash out on surprises, the emotional value of Proxima soars high above the fray.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Freaky has enough snappy fun to keep it ticking along to the inevitable “shock” ending, forcing together two delightful powerhouses in a battle royale that seems primed to kickstart another new franchise for Landon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Erbland
    Despite a strong start, Bertino’s grim and gruesome The Dark and the Wicked never coalesces into anything more than a collection of chilling images and a paper-thin logic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    The imagery and impact of Kindred is impressive, and while it may not stick the landing, the path there is well worth flying.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Predictability doesn’t have to be a sin when it comes to the often paint-by-the-numbers world of romantic comedy, but this awkward combination of expectation and disdain for it make for a film only fleetingly worthy of celebration.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    The result is an entertaining and insightful mashup of tropes, both respectful of what came before and willing to try new tricks. Being a weirdo, it seems, has never gone out of fashion, but now it has a different kind of future to conjure up.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Rich in its execution and careful in its approach, The Sounding resonates.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    American Selfie is an urgent look at a fractured country and culture.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    So, really, what does happen when a kid detective grows up? In Morgan’s hands, something curious, laced with pitch black comedy and a major dose of tragedy, a winking sense of genre, and a stellar performance from Brody.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Little of it will surprise the group’s long-time fans (or, as popular parlance now deems them, “stans”) and it will likely spark interested newbies to seek out further information, but Blackpink: Light Up the Sky does a stellar job of introducing Jisoo, Jennie, Rosé, and Lisa as individuals.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    Evil Eye packs plenty of compelling cultural specificity inside its frames, it never attempts to dig any deeper into the wider world of that stuff that would scare anyone.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Paragas’ film finds fresh ground to explore the price and the power of the American dream, bolstered by country crooning and heartbreaking (and very real) legal worries. It’s a concept that might sound played out, but deft directing and a number of strong performances recommend it, a down-home answer to the similarly charming 2018 drama “Wild Rose.”
    • 45 Metascore
    • 33 Kate Erbland
    Sud’s film is a master class in bad decision-making, improbable choices, and overwrought acting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Bolstered by a creative storytelling set-up, Ruben and his very game co-star Aya Cash skewr horror tropes as well as cultural obsessions ranging from TV talent shows to the Bechdel Test. The result is a winking horror comedy with a lot on its mind — perhaps too much.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    True stories about brave, everyday people fighting evil powers never go out of fashion, and “A Call to Spy” joins their ranks with ease.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    An impeccably produced look at a heinous crime, Popplewell’s documentary meticulously weaves together a wealth of information . . . that it almost feels too readymade for the film treatment. Almost.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    While Rebecca Frayn and Gaby Chiappe’s script works hard to give all of its players dimension, such an overstuffed narrative tends to do the opposite, limping through sub-subplots and continually introducing new characters, leaving its main attractions to twist in the wind.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    While platitudes about how this is really just about love — not money or industry or good old-fashioned greed — are far too simplistic, at least the movie attempts to make its issues feel personal enough to make people care. Sure, it’s cheesy idea, but that doesn’t mean that the bedrock truth isn’t real. The same logic applies to the film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    Part creature feature, part war-is-hell nightmare, and entirely dedicated to cutting down the misogynist jerks who populate it, there’s enough giddy fun to power Shadow in the Cloud through just about anything.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Kate Erbland
    While formulaic on its face, Green’s film resists the sort of obvious cinematic catharsis expected of such a story, resulting in a final product that earns its emotional beats.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Kate Erbland
    While Souza and his life and work are more than interesting enough topics for a documentary, what The Way I See It is really about — what it really wants to be about — is not the man who took the photographs, but the man who was the subject of those photographs.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Dramas pile up, some obvious, some not, and Penguin Bloom meanders a bit before coming in to land. The path there might be predictable, but there is still something beautiful when it really takes flight.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Kate Erbland
    Twists abound, and while they don’t always pay off, at least “I Care a Lot” cares enough to deliver a full, bloody meal of a film for anyone intrigued by the allure of anti-heroes.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Erbland
    I Am Greta is not always as disarmingly open as its star, however, and keeping its focus so narrowly on the past two years robs it of some nuance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Kate Erbland
    One Night in Miami hits so hard because it remains joyfully, often painfully grounded in what makes a person extraordinary, even when the world isn’t ready for them. Here’s hoping this world is ready for what King has to show it.

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