For 963 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Katie Walsh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 How to Survive a Plague
Lowest review score: 0 Father Figures
Score distribution:
963 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    If he is trying to say something (and it’s unclear what that might be), all of the fuss and muss obfuscates any message, and even worse, any emotional connection to the film. This latest dispatch is indeed a profound disappointment.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    In trying to do too much, Halloween Kills ends up doing nothing at all, other than tarnishing this franchise’s good name.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    For an adoptee, the notion of “family” is so much more complicated and layered than it might be for someone else, but what Found powerfully argues is that within these many layers, there is an abundance of a unique kind of love, and understanding, to be found. You just have to look for it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    It’s a different register for Rapace, who remains controlled, with a few explosions of emotion. But she is present and instinctual, imbuing Maria with a steely but soft power: decisive, persuasive and feminine.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    The Addams Family 2 feels as if it’s lost the spark of the first one. The jokes that felt fresh in the first film are stale here, with the story’s twists glaringly predictable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    Seth’s cinematography is stunning, meeting the mood of each contrasting moment but set within a cohesive look that gives the film a dreamy, unreal quality.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    The ending is ambiguous enough to be refreshingly un-clichéd. While “I’m Your Man” is very romantic in its own way, the movie is elevated by pondering not just love but life and our impending relationship to advanced artificial intelligence, a question that is surely already upon us.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    The effort put into making this film work is palpable, but the result is something deeply surreal and strange. Perhaps this story simply can’t work as a film, or perhaps it wasn’t a very good musical to begin with. It’s a question that may be debated for years to come.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    Layered storytelling that tests the limits of the screen and the fourth wall allows for Clark and Brownstein to play at playing themselves, making for a sharp, comedic commentary on the way fame complicates identity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    As Chon calibrates a wide variety of emotions, allowing space for all the agonies, ecstasies, repressions and excesses, he crafts a tale of intergenerational traumas and personal redemptions that is an emotionally complicated yet ultimately cathartic viewing experience.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Katie Walsh
    Queenpins does nothing other than waste your time with bad wigs and poop jokes, and that is the biggest crime of all.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Katie Walsh
    It’s underwritten yet over-stuffed with songs, and the production itself feels chintzy and airless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    No Man of God is impeccably and carefully directed by Sealey, and the craft on display is remarkable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Katie Walsh
    DaCosta, who made her directorial debut with the remarkable abortion drama “Little Woods,” firmly announces herself as an artist at work with Candyman, a genuinely terrifying and artful horror film that speaks with a bell-clear voice to the current moment, the product of centuries of racist power structures.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Katie Walsh
    The modern noir style and genre innovation are such a neat cinematic twist that it’s a bit of a letdown that the world doesn’t always feel fully fleshed out.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    Ema
    Larraín crafts a mesmerizing cinematic rhythm that alternates between montage and slow camera movements; the film’s push-pull tempo mimics that of Ema’s own intimate machinations.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    Reynolds is a bit too glib and smug to buy as the romantic lead. It’s actually a relief that the movie salvages the romance by relegating it to the game world. But the whole film remains a bit too glib and smug anyway.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    Written by Scott Wascha, the script is simultaneously crude, rude and whip-smart. Wexler‘s direction is a rapid-fire attack of highly stylized skirmishes and aestheticized action.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    Taylor plays Dawn’s slide into this mental health crisis beautifully, and with conviction, and Owen is stunning as the high-achieving, yet fragile Melanie, who seeks oblivion and solace in a risky boyfriend (Ian Nelson).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Katie Walsh
    Joe Bell is a tale of emotional redemption for a man who relearns what it means to “be a man,” and his moments of triumph are the quietest ones.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    It wants to comment on the algorithms that rule our lives, spewing constantly recycled content at us seemingly at random, but it is exactly the thing that it points to: an upcycled Frankenstein’s monster of intellectual property spraying a stew of Easter eggs and Halloween costumes at the viewer, praying that something sticks.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Katie Walsh
    Escape Room: Tournament of Champions is a pastiche of its predecessors, using this mosaic of tropes and formula familiarity as a shorthand to keep the film pared down to the basics of what exactly makes it tick: increasingly sadistic puzzles and a great cast of characters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Katie Walsh
    Pribar’s humane and heartbreaking drama is beautifully photographed and performed; a loving, warm, and even sexy film about death and dying that is teeming with life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Katie Walsh
    Zola’s authorship and Bravo’s respect for her storytelling make Zola a wholly original experience. It’s a brutally honest account of sex work, often dangerous and infrequently sexy, punctuated with Zola’s one-liners, observations and recounting of laugh-out-loud moments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    DeMonaco and Gout cook up such delicious comeuppance that you can’t help but indulge in the pleasure of revenge, even if the terrors and pleasures are incredibly fraught.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Katie Walsh
    Lee (who directed episodes of “Broad City”) and Glazer swerve from comedy to horror, using the genre as a vehicle for social commentary about modern motherhood, misogyny and manipulation. False Positive is Glazer’s “Get Out,” which is a phrase you want to scream at her character, Lucy, over and over again.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    In F9, bonkers on top of bonkers results in a truly delightful and vividly sensorial time at the movies.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Katie Walsh
    Some may enjoy the cacophonous, raunchy, lowest-common-denominator dreck that The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard has to offer. To those I say, godspeed. But it’s undeniable that the actors, the audiences and the filmmakers all deserve better.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    Censor is a bold artistic statement, inspired by the history of its own genre, though it’s not an uncritical assertion, posing complicated questions about media effects without offering easy answers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    [Barden] becomes the vessel to express Riegel’s quiet cri de coeur, which is not just yearning to escape one’s own circumstances but the absolute necessity of it.

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