For 869 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Katie Walsh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Maiden
Lowest review score: 0 Father Figures
Score distribution:
869 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    Blackbird is a simple tale, well-told, but it’s also the tale of all tales, of life, death and everything in between.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Katie Walsh
    For all the film’s minor flaws, it is deeply moving and incredibly important to witness the impact of "I Am Woman” as an enduring, uplifting cry for freedom and empowerment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    The lush production design by Zazu Myers, especially in the Chloe Hotel, and rich cinematography by Alar Kivilo make for a colorfully saturated fantasy of New York City that elevates the film. This is a big, juicy rom-com that has proven to be a rare entity these days on the big screen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Katie Walsh
    Bill and Ted bouncing through time means the narratives of these films are merely loose assortments of kooky bits and cameos, and “Face the Music” doesn’t stray from that. While it doesn’t quite gel cohesively, in this casual kickback with a pair of old pals, it’s the dudes who remain excellent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Katie Walsh
    The story is simple but what makes the film remarkable is how Haley effortlessly, earnestly marshals performance, tone and style.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    Sharrock’s directing is unshowy, focused on the characters and performance moments that make this film a simple, yet effectively moving story about dreaming of a life beyond the walls, something we can all appreciate at this particular moment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Katie Walsh
    Though the film initially feels like a patriotic tale of a daring mission, this isn't a story of U.S. military triumph, it's one of sorrow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    The film swerves from sci-fi to horror to psychological thriller to melodrama, but in a way, it works. It’s clear Abramenko wants to serve a full-course meal of a movie, and in stretching the dynamic range of emotion he hits on moments that are at times operatic and at others somewhat soapy. But in doing so, brings a new layer of story that makes Sputnik feel epic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Katie Walsh
    It is potentially the most culturally relevant film of the fall, masterfully made and one heck of an emotional roller coaster. From moment to moment Boys State veers from exciting to troubling to amusing, and it's never anything less than utterly riveting.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Katie Walsh
    It gestures toward controversial ideas but always swerves back to a simple but profound message of togetherness and family, and the personal importance of honoring tradition and memory.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    Although The Fight is swift and jam-packed with ups, downs, wins, losses, injunctions, stays, hearings and Trump speeches, the film is remarkably detailed and careful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    It's a refreshing spin on this type of film that's usually quite white and heteronormative.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Katie Walsh
    Maine’s film captures something indelible about adolescent female desire, without condescending or objectifying, because she understands, subjectively, what that looks and feels like: all the confusion and shame, but yes, also the pleasure to be found there. She beautifully depicts something that has been rarely seen on film: the lustful gaze of an adolescent woman (as opposed to the lustful gaze being directed at her).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    Despite the talent involved, and the incredible subject matter, the irritating tendency to over-explain to the audience means there’s very little spark to be found in the enervating Radioactive.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Katie Walsh
    What is remarkable, though, is just how unbelievably unbelievable this inspired-by-true-life tale is.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    The film undeniably captures the breathtaking and unique landscape of coastal Western Australia. It's an incredibly beautiful film, but it's a challenge to emotionally connect to it. It feels like the outline of what would have been an epic novel, but in the translation to the screen, it has lost its interiority, and anything profound it might have communicated.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    All too often, the human aspect gets lost in the spectacle of an action movie. But Rucka and Prince-Bythewood foreground that element of the story to create something with stakes, intrigue and philosophical weight. They make sure this cool concept and cast are given their due, and set up a sequel too. With any luck, we'll see this world again.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    Porter’s film is a warm biography and depiction of Lewis’ life, but there are moments where one wishes it had a bit more bite.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    Jeong and Schaal are quite funny in the limited time they're given, but one can't help but think the story would have worked so much better as a drama, or some kind of "Man on Fire" actioner, with Coleman's chops and Bautista's brooding presence. Hopefully a director can figure out what best to do with him as a leading man, and soon.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    He (Stewart) bogs down his talented cast with a bewildering plot, tired tropes and embarrassing dialogue. This one, well, it's simply resistible.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    Beharie is a tremendous actress, and Miss Juneteenth offers her a complex and nuanced role to prove her range. Peoples visually creates a rich tapestry of place, offering a peek into this world and filling it with believable characters, while carefully threading the historical and cultural significance of Juneteenth throughout. Daniel Patterson's cinematography is remarkable: beautiful, and with an easy, authentic groove.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    Murphy isn't afraid to play with color and light and text and music, or to let her characters dance like no one is watching, and often. That energy, embodied in the filmmaking and in the performances, is what puts this coming-of-age film into a class all its own.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    There is real potential in this premise, and a few flickers of genuine artfulness, but the storytelling is frustratingly abstruse, making for an Exit Plan that’s a real missed opportunity.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    The whole endeavor is a naked attempt to cash in on the young adult fantasy trend spearheaded by "Harry Potter." There have been many attempts to snatch the Potter crown (and purse) but Artemis Fowl will not be the hot new kiddie fantasy franchise, based on this utterly charmless first entry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Katie Walsh
    Apatow's greatest strength as a filmmaker is an eye for charismatic performers who are just fun to be around, and The King of Staten Island is a testament to that. In Davidson, Apatow has a uniquely compelling young comedian.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Katie Walsh
    Written by Nick Moore, Ruckus Skye and Lane Skye, the script just doesn't give us enough material to care about the story, which is devoid of subtext and keeps everything on the surface.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    Feels incredibly fresh and modern in its singular style and tone.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Katie Walsh
    The whole thing is a wild concept, hinging on the plausibility of every character's motivations, which are all a bit squishy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Katie Walsh
    It is an almost startlingly intimate film, following this strange relationship between these two, as they go through the challenges of life.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Katie Walsh
    An angry, violent and despairing film, without much of a point other than that existence can be angry and despairing and memory is a prison. As a piece of art, entertainment or cultural ephemera, it is indeed bold, but it is significant not for what it says about Capone, but rather what it says about Trank, and the ongoing saga of his career.

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