For 726 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Uhlich's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Level Five
Lowest review score: 0 Jojo Rabbit
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 68 out of 726
726 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Uhlich
    Where the love story was a means-to-an-end afterthought in the first Matrix, it’s now the crux of the tale, and the emotional undercurrents are so intoxicating that it more than makes up for the relative inelegance of the action scenes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Getting old, as Jackie and Don would have it, is part of their overall project. More than once they talk about the impermanence of the materials they use. One day, their art will cease to be, as will they. That Zen pronouncement doesn’t make the day-in/day-out drudgery of aging any easier.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    This Bond’s overall arc from modishly merciless killing machine to aging assassin with the familial feels comes off as a treacly sop to psychological complexity.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Uhlich
    What’s absent here is the murderous lust for power that dovetails with Macbeth and Lady Macbeth’s lust for each other, and which proves their mutual undoing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    When it comes to individual people and their hopes, fears and desires, Akl has a talent for both the surreal flourish and the grounded insight. In this case, the bigger picture and the larger point are what prove elusive, leaving the whole enterprise feeling sadly schematic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Uhlich
    Terence Davies’s film is a rhapsodic portrayal of an upper-crust milieu in which words are wielded like weapons by people who might otherwise be pariahs.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Uhlich
    Godzilla and Kong’s brawls have the ennui-inducing feel of a child arbitrarily smashing action figures together.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Uhlich
    Its provocations can seem savage at a glance, but they emerge from an observational tranquility that is uniquely Frederick Wiseman’s own.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    Director Nick Rowland couldn't ask for a more magnetically tormented character to anchor his low-key-to-a-fault feature debut.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    [A] very funny, very moving documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    Heimat certainly has the feel of a summative work
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Keith Uhlich
    The closing scenes of Straight Up are more contrived and constrained — an acquiescence to living inside the box, with one dramatic wrinkle that feels tacked on and ill-considered. The fiery talent that Sweeney displays throughout, both in front of and behind the camera, regrettably ends up ashen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    At one point, Tsemel describes herself as a member of an occupying force and defines her mission in life as to somehow rectify the resultant power imbalance. The only way to get there, as the film's pointed final image suggests, is to keep on trudging.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Uhlich
    Marielle Heller takes a script that many filmmakers would turn into cringe-inducing treacle and interrogates the sentimental trappings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    In the end, it can’t help but sentimentalize the better angels that supposedly reside in the land of liberty’s flawed human fabric.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Uhlich
    The sense of a nascent community rising up out of the primordial muck is palpable, so it’s unfortunate that John Magaro and Orion Lee's characters ultimately feel outside it all.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Uhlich
    Noah Hawley treats his protagonist’s story as a somber tragedy that at times stoops to trashiness.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Uhlich
    Scorsese knows what his audience is hoping for: glory days, resurrected. But he also understands the impossibility of anyone being exactly as they once were. So he weaves that longing into both The Irishman‘s text and its technique.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Keith Uhlich
    This is a tumultuous muse story in which the artist and his inspiration just happen to be blood relations.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    There's a tight, tense thriller in all this. Unfortunately, director Deon Taylor and screenwriter Peter A. Dowling stretch things out to a logy 104 minutes. Too often, the suspense dissipates between action scenes when it should be consistent and relentless, even in the quietest moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Keith Uhlich
    Olive paints a portrait of righteous rage and determination.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Uhlich
    The Looney Tunes nature of Rambo’s murder spree tempers much of the script’s ideological offense.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    Renée Zellweger can reach all the notes and hit all the marks, but Garland’s intense emoting eludes her.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Uhlich
    Steven Soderbergh takes a macro approach to the scandal, though the results, with rare exception, are vexingly micro.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Uhlich
    The images, and the actions within them, lack the acerbic edge that would really drive the knife in.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Uhlich
    The film is one that might have been dreamed up by one of the cynical douche bros from the Hangover during a blacked-out stupor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 0 Keith Uhlich
    Waititi is incapable of dealing with the twin horrors of oppression and indoctrination beyond cheap-seats sentimentality and joke-making.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Uhlich
    It’s not hard to parallel David/Dickens’s head-spinningly intricate descriptors with Iannucci’s own prodding, poetically vulgar rhetoric.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Keith Uhlich
    The blurring of the lines between fiction and fact still mostly feels like a crutch or an affectation. It's as if Cordero and Croda are trying to goose the drama rather than unearth it, never entirely trusting that Felipe's life is interesting enough as is.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Keith Uhlich
    Schimberg confidently blurs the lines between fantasy and reality (more than once a scene that appears to be real is actually fiction and vice versa), though never to the point that it detracts from the people onscreen.

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