For 173 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Watson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 The Harder They Come (1972)
Lowest review score: 12 The Aspern Papers
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 78 out of 173
  2. Negative: 55 out of 173
173 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    Downhill never makes much of an impact as it moves from one mildly amusing cringe-comedy set piece to the next.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    The film undermines Cunningham’s egalitarianism by linking him directly with the kind of elite snobbery and wealth fixation he abhorred.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    In the film, the Battle of Midway suggests something out of a photorealistic animated film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    By focusing so narrowly on the Lewis brothers’ relationship with their mother, the film inadvertently minimizes the scope of their abuse.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Watson
    The Harder They Come’s greatest asset may still be its soundtrack, which makes such a stirring impact because it provides a cathartic release from the grim realities depicted on screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Daniel Scheinert’s film finds a very human vulnerability lurking beneath the strange and oafish behaviors of its male characters.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Maika Monroe’s engaging performance serves only to highlight how feeble and unconvincing the rest of the film is.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Throughout, the subtle glimpses of a couple’s lingering affection for one another complicate the bitterness of their separation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Only in its giddily gory finale does the outrageousness of the film's violence come close to matching that of its plot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    At heart, Victor Kossakovsky's Aquarela is a war film: a cacophonous survey of the global battle between man and water.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    The film is a quietly radical attempt to view the world from a non-human perspective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Watson
    Radu Jude’s film is a bitterly comic essay on nationalist mythologies and historical amnesia.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Watson
    Ultimately, the only truly retro thing about this weirdly reactionary potboiler is its politics.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    There are hints that the film will scale itself to the broader historical context of this era, but the screenplay never elaborates on the ethnic strife the undergirds the Cambodian genocide.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    The film is ostensibly about the war for the soul of a house, but it couldn’t feel less lived in.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    As in Laika’s other efforts, the humor in the film is more wry than gut-busting, but Chris Butler has developed some truly inventive comic characters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Watson
    The film is a clunky, overwritten attempt to pack as many tortured subplots and pre-chewed sociological insights as can possibly fit into a two-hour runtime.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Watson
    As the world continues to suffer ever-increasing mass die-offs of honeybee colonies, Ljubomir Stefanov and Tamara Kotevska’s film reminds us that there’s indeed a better way to interact with our planet—one rooted in patience, tradition, and a true respect for our surroundings.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Tim Burton manages to put his stamp on this clunky behemoth of a film, but in the end, the Mouse always wins.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Carol Morley’s film wants to blow our minds, but it succeeds only at rousing our boredom.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    In the film, hardly any fact about cystic fibrosis is raised without being doubly, even triply, underlined for viewers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Its scenes wildly escalate to a fever pitch at the drop of a hat, before then ending, more often than not, with abrupt violence.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    The film is a penetrating an indictment of the bureaucratic obstacles placed in front of refugees.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    It’s this carefully managed equilibrium between the inherent preposterousness of its mystical milieu and the convincing emotional reality of Laura’s journey that ultimately makes The Changeover, for all its muddled mythos, a lively and engaging excursion into an unusually naturalistic world of magic.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Jonas Åkerlund’s breezy approach to this material not only cheapens the music, but also has the effect of downplaying the severity of the scene’s truly unsavory politics.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    The documentary is uniquely attuned to the fickle whims of history, politics, and biographical circumstance.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Watson
    The grim Australian biker drama Outlaws is little more than an endless stream of brooding, yelling, and “badass” posturing broken up by grisly violence and gratuitous sex scenes.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 12 Keith Watson
    The words of Henry James have never sounded as leaden and preposterous as they do in Julien Landais’s The Aspern Papers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    The Venerable W. is at times downright dowdy, but there’s an ever-present sense of rage and despair burbling beneath its placid surface.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Kaku Arakawa's documentary is a candid snapshot of a great artist as an old man.

Top Trailers