For 207 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 20% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Watson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 The Harder They Come
Lowest review score: 12 Ithaca
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 62 out of 207
207 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 12 Keith Watson
    Alice plays as an inadvertent parody of contemporary liberalism’s fascination with and fetishization of ‘70s black radicalism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Mariama Diallo’s film never seems to fully buy into its horror trappings and ends up treating its characters as avatars for multiple grievances.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Throughout The Humans, Stephen Karam orchestrates the highs and lows of a family reunion with Chekhovian subtlety.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    C’mon C’mon admirably doesn’t indulge in heartstring-tugging pathos, but the film suffers from a certain shapelessness.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    A constant sense of motion can’t obscure how stale, secondhand, and spiritless this entire endeavor feels.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    Though eerie and quietly deadpan, the film circles its grab bag of themes for so long that it also becomes tedious.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    There’s a haunting beauty to Tatiana Huezo’s depiction of the gradual cross-contamination of childhood innocence and criminal aggression.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film effectively immerses us in the wrenching details of Amin’s story, but it keeps us just a bit too far removed from the man himself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film meticulously evokes a 1961 speleological expedition, but its search for thematic resonance is frustratingly general.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Watson
    This grimly self-serious tale of violent destiny is consistently drowned out by Vicente Amorim’s overreaching visual style.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Candyman doesn’t merely note the connection between fear and remembrance, it also interrogates it from every possible angle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    When Jennifer Hudson is singing her heart out, not so much approximating Aretha’s voice as channeling her soul, the effect is transportive.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    A methodical, if largely allegorical, exploration of its main character’s psyche, the film smooths out the enduring mysteries, opaque psychology, and narrative idiosyncrasies of its source material.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Old
    In the moments when Old works, it’s because M. Night Shyamalan embraces the inherent weirdness of his material.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Pixar’s most intimate and laidback effort since Ratatouille feels like a throwback to one of Mark Twain’s rollicking picaresque sagas.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    The film apes the style that James Wan established with the original Conjuring without establishing any real identity of its own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Keith Watson
    The film's rendering of the interplay of memory, identity, and grief is disappointingly vague.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Watson
    Amalia Ulman’s film is a bittersweet comedy of human behavior observed with a relaxed yet intently focused eye.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Dominic Cooke’s film is content to regurgitate some of the more tired artistic tropes about the Cold War.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    After a while, it’s hard not to feel like Radu Jude is simply shooting fish in a barrel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Keith Thomas’s film hums with uncanny dread, milking the close juxtaposition of living and dead for all its worth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film gets at the profound truth that our relationship with another person is, at its core, a collection of shared memories.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Keith Watson
    The film minimizes the tragedy of the human race’s near-complete annihilation by positioning it as the backdrop for the world’s most grandiose deadbeat-dad redemption arc.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film is brightly colored, inventively designed, and constantly flirting with the outright psychedelic, but it's so packed full of incident that it rarely gives its jokes the space to land.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Too often, the film teases big, wild comedic set pieces that end up deflating almost instantly.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Dick Johnson Is Dead is very much a film about its own making, one which repeatedly exposes its artifice.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    By the time the credits roll on the film, we realize we’ve been watching not so much a sketch of the lives of farm animals as a threnody for their deaths.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Bas Devos’s film is a street-lit trek through the eerily empty avenues and byways of a city at sleep.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Keith Watson
    Everything here wraps up as tidily as it does in your average Hallmark Channel movie.

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