For 218 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 20% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 77% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Keith Watson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 The Harder They Come
Lowest review score: 12 Alice
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 65 out of 218
218 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Throughout the film, the quick-hit jokes from the show’s rich cast of oddballs serves to suggest a vibrant world outside of the Belchers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    A collage-like tale of vengeance told with an often impressionistic elusiveness, the film can also be bewildering in its juxtapositions.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Apollo 10½ ultimately suggests that memory distorts and amplifies just as much as it preserves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Writer-director Nikyatu Jusu’s film ultimately proposes that survival is the greatest form of resistance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Throughout The Humans, Stephen Karam orchestrates the highs and lows of a family reunion with Chekhovian subtlety.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    C’mon C’mon admirably doesn’t indulge in heartstring-tugging pathos, but the film suffers from a certain shapelessness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    There’s a haunting beauty to Tatiana Huezo’s depiction of the gradual cross-contamination of childhood innocence and criminal aggression.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film effectively immerses us in the wrenching details of Amin’s story, but it keeps us just a bit too far removed from the man himself.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film meticulously evokes a 1961 speleological expedition, but its search for thematic resonance is frustratingly general.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Candyman doesn’t merely note the connection between fear and remembrance, it also interrogates it from every possible angle.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    When Jennifer Hudson is singing her heart out, not so much approximating Aretha’s voice as channeling her soul, the effect is transportive.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    A methodical, if largely allegorical, exploration of its main character’s psyche, the film smooths out the enduring mysteries, opaque psychology, and narrative idiosyncrasies of its source material.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Old
    In the moments when Old works, it’s because M. Night Shyamalan embraces the inherent weirdness of his material.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Pixar’s most intimate and laidback effort since Ratatouille feels like a throwback to one of Mark Twain’s rollicking picaresque sagas.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Keith Watson
    Amalia Ulman’s film is a bittersweet comedy of human behavior observed with a relaxed yet intently focused eye.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    After a while, it’s hard not to feel like Radu Jude is simply shooting fish in a barrel.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Keith Thomas’s film hums with uncanny dread, milking the close juxtaposition of living and dead for all its worth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film gets at the profound truth that our relationship with another person is, at its core, a collection of shared memories.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film is brightly colored, inventively designed, and constantly flirting with the outright psychedelic, but it's so packed full of incident that it rarely gives its jokes the space to land.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Too often, the film teases big, wild comedic set pieces that end up deflating almost instantly.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Dick Johnson Is Dead is very much a film about its own making, one which repeatedly exposes its artifice.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    By the time the credits roll on the film, we realize we’ve been watching not so much a sketch of the lives of farm animals as a threnody for their deaths.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Bas Devos’s film is a street-lit trek through the eerily empty avenues and byways of a city at sleep.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Keith Watson
    The film ultimately depicts a world in which people are left with no other option but to devour their own.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    The film makes the path to basketball glory and the road to personal redemption seem oddly effortless.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Keith Watson
    The Harder They Come’s greatest asset may still be its soundtrack, which makes such a stirring impact because it provides a cathartic release from the grim realities depicted on screen.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Daniel Scheinert’s film finds a very human vulnerability lurking beneath the strange and oafish behaviors of its male characters.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Keith Watson
    Throughout, the subtle glimpses of a couple’s lingering affection for one another complicate the bitterness of their separation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Keith Watson
    Only in its giddily gory finale does the outrageousness of the film's violence come close to matching that of its plot.

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