For 362 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kevin Crust's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Farewell Amor
Lowest review score: 0 Chaos
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 29 out of 362
362 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    Liman, who has a reputation for reviving troubled productions and salvaging films in postproduction, excavates an hour and 48 minutes of relatively engaging action-thriller material. It moves quickly enough to gloss over plot holes but leaves the impression that the novel was stripped for parts.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    Within the confines of a straight-ahead, handsomely designed and photographed biopic beats the heart of a more adventurous presentation of Holiday’s tragic life. It’s hinted at in Day’s performance, the dreamlike memory sequences and a cheeky, meta-coda that plays out during the end credits but never quite pierces the film’s more varnished surfaces.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    The film’s higher aims never take hold. The breeziness feels at odds with implied gravitas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    An engrossing peek inside the Mideast peace talks during the Clinton administration.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    Sometimes you just don’t want a movie to end. The characters are so vivid and multidimensional, the milieu so inviting, the circumstances so compelling, you don’t want to let go. The Dig, starring Carey Mulligan and Ralph Fiennes, is such a movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    It’s a profound, immersive lesson in empathy that should resonate with anyone interested in neurodiversity or simply seeking a more inclusive society.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    The film’s themes of extinction and survival are worthy of thoughtful treatment, something that eludes the ambitious movie as it succumbs to a schematic and sentimental telling that overreaches for a grand gesture and obscures the more meaningful ideas.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    Allowed surprising access to Sotudeh’s life, the film achieves stirring results if not an always fluid narrative.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Kevin Crust
    Its beauty lies in its empathy — something currently in short supply and therefore very welcome in the stories we consume.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    We are likely to be watching films on this subject for years to come, but for it’s sheer in-the-moment rawness, 76 Days is one that will stick in your consciousness for some time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    There’s a much appreciated sweetness and innocence to what we witness, a truly diverse group of Americans selflessly helping one another, joy being their only compensation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    It is the type of stirring entertainment that delivers both the thrill of the moment and the kind of sophisticated ideas that can lead to discussion and even debate long after viewing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    The filmmaker deftly moves backward and forward in time to chronicle Ngoy’s remarkable journey from war-torn Cambodia to the strip malls of Orange County while becoming a multimillionaire.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Sometimes when the moment comes to reconcile our feelings, we freeze or fumble the opportunity; other times, when we finally process the emotions and can articulate the thoughts, it is too late to communicate them. Coming Home Again, sweetly, sometimes painfully, evokes this experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    Harry Chapin: When in Doubt, Do Something is an uplifting tribute to an impressive human being.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Though the film’s casual structure lulls you into thinking not much is going on, the gently shifting power dynamics between the characters, and a reversal of the traditional gender roles sets up an unexpectedly moving resolution.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    The Wolf of Snow Hollow is a pleasingly quirky outing that has fun with the mythologies of both monsters and men.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Kevin Crust
    The filmmakers are tackling a broad, evolving topic and the documentary struggles to maintain a throughline.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    Oliver Sacks: His Own Life is a moving portrait of a man taking deep stock of his life with great satisfaction and verve. It
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Kiss the Ground is the good kind of kale. It’s dense but nutritious. The science is explained in simple terms with plenty of visually striking graphics and animation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Kevin Crust
    Cohn, an Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker, likely was aiming for subtlety, but these are not subtle times. Trying to get a spark from a damp match is a lot harder than holding a flame to dry kindling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Though as leisurely as a summer’s day, this kaleidoscopic memory film has an intensity of purpose that wants to knock you on your heels — or maybe harder — in its take on gentrification.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Enola provides a richly fanciful, fresh perspective on the well-worn family name.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    The film makes an ardent case to stay ever-vigilant against the ongoing threat to the electoral process.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    The genre elements are nicely balanced by the adult drama embodied in the lead quartet’s performances, especially Rapace’s turn that is part femme fatale, part damaged soul.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    Jeff Orlowski’s The Social Dilemma may be the most important documentary you see this year.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    The feature debut of music video director Ninian Doff is probably best viewed late at night under the influence of a mind-altering, preferably hallucinatory, substance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    For anyone missing this summer’s Tokyo Olympics, postponed to March, Rising Phoenix is a fitting bridge for one night, resoundingly demonstrating that an athlete is an athlete. You will never watch the games in the same way.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    Wilmott’s affecting historical drama “The 24th,” inspired by the Houston riot of 1917, bears both the weight of that history and the filmmaker’s passion for the subject matter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    It takes some big swings at a big subject and almost — not quite — pulls it off.

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