For 326 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kevin Crust's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Genesis
Lowest review score: 0 Chaos
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 326
326 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    Schneider’s direction is taut, limiting much of the action to the confined spaces of the ship’s bridge and its vantage points. The close quarters ratchet up the tension and intimacy of a space where everyone can see you sweat.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    In the final act, the film embraces some of those larger points, and Herzog ends with a striking final image leaving us to contemplate the transactional nature and true cost of all human relationships.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    That Hoon lived such a prototypically rock ‘n’ roll lifestyle, while simultaneously commenting on it — he notes his first broken hotel room mirror — is fascinating. And heartbreaking.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    There are a number of sharp political and philosophical points made, but they are undercut by “The 11th Green’s” overload of history, speculation and fantasy that strands it in a narrative Bermuda Triangle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    Though it’s a shame that Mr. Jones is not more cohesive, the remarkable story of Gareth Jones retains its potency. It’s a bracing reminder that we can never allow the advocates of truth to be silenced.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    In sharing these often harrowing stories, “Unsettled” paints a sobering but ultimately hopeful portrait of possibility for those who are allowed to enter.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    As in his previous films, the Oscar-nominated "How to Survive a Plague” and “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson,” France, an investigative reporter, presents ordinary citizens doing remarkable things. If only our governments could learn to follow suit.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    The cast, especially Gordon-Levitt and Memar as Vedat, the youngest of the hijackers, excel at combining drama and physicality. Rather than the over-choreographed fight scenes of most Hollywood movies, the violence here is clumsy, painful and visceral.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    There’s a terrific ensemble — including Ella-Grace Gregoire as a girl Jack has a crush on — but it’s Nighy who will have you enthralled. He delivers a subtle, nuanced performance that allows the actor to shine while in full support of his costars.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 40 Kevin Crust
    This is not a “but the book was better” argument. It’s simply that by abandoning the original character and cobbling together broken story shards and spare parts, Branagh and company have produced something off an assembly line: safe, generic and utterly disposable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    It’s a simple recipe and remarkably effective.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    The documentary “After Parkland,” released in 2019, takes a more intimate approach to the lives lost. Parkland Rising, on the other hand, focuses on the activism and the political impact it had, an impassioned record of incremental change in an age of uncertainty. The fight continues.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Powered by unbridled optimism, Gameau defies skeptics by doing his homework and bringing receipts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    The film frequently feels like a branding exercise but manages to remain entertaining and informative.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    While director Daniel Traub has little time to dive too deeply, the documentary serves as a fascinating glimpse into an artist’s work, inspirations and process.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Kevin Crust
    Hawkes is terrific with a softer-edged character than we’re used to seeing from the actor (“Deadwood,” “Winter’s Bone”). He’s heartbreaking in scenes where disappointment and resignation play across his face. Lerman is a fine foil, energizing scenes with his edgy impatience and willingness to be unlikable for the majority of the film.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    More evolution than sequel, Chen maintains the laidback, low-fi charm and black-and-white aesthetic infused with Nakamura’s dreamy, pensive music but also grows the characters, infusing them with more narrative purpose.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Kevin Crust
    No surprises await, but the performances by Scott Thomas, Horgan and company and some pleasant harmonizing make Military Wives palatable Memorial Day weekend viewing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    Once the movie shifts gears, it’s less about the working man and more about the human. That sounds like a good thing, but the further Working Man creeps into emotionally over-calibrated basic cable territory, the less real it feels.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    It’s a Shakespearean rhapsody in indigo where love, friendship, betrayal and revenge swirl and blur with life-changing consequences.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    As directed by New Zealand filmmaker Justin Pemberton, “Capital” is a sleek tour of economic history over the last 400 years or so.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Wu is confident enough to make the bold strokes her characters speak of and craft a movie that’s comfortably different.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    Barker and Borten have chosen to retain the documentary’s framing device of the rescue attempt. In the nonfiction film, it served as a propulsive engine, carefully balanced against the interviews that told Vieira de Mello’s story and its tragic conclusion. Here, it feels abstract, disjointed from the scenes with him and Carolina, thus weakening and muddying the story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    It is a movie that will reward your patience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    The film never really delves beyond the level of observation and the simplistic explanations it does offer are not very satisfying; cloaking possible mental illness in religious zealotry simply clouds whatever the directors meant to convey.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Crust
    The movie leans too heavily on quirk to express character and we are left as annoyed at Timmy’s antics as the adults in his life or the kids in his class (save the one girl who finds him “fascinating”).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Crust
    Reflected in its native language title (“My Lens”), Chinese Portrait is a personal reflection on the country’s past and present. Brimming with humanity, Wang’s contemplative, minimalist approach forces us to consider the day-to-day lives of these people, and perhaps our own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Crust
    Moving in its humanity and forceful in its pragmatism, the documentary feels like essential viewing, especially for decision makers with the power to enact similar initiatives.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Crust
    There is a guileless quality to the enterprise as Young interviews stars such as Chita Rivera, Florence Henderson and Martin Short who worked in industrials, as well as the lesser known performers and songwriters who became his heroes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Kevin Crust
    Billed as a romantic comedy but really a farce, The Perfect Kiss is the perfect example of a movie that is so bad it’s … no, not good, just terrible.

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