For 106 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kevin Fallon's Scores

Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Forever (2018): Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 The Four: Battle for Stardom: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 73 out of 106
  2. Negative: 9 out of 106
106 tv reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    In what’s been a woefully bland fall TV season, especially for network comedy, it’s frankly a delight to watch a sitcom this solid, with a cast of people you love this much, all executing so well, and, we hope at some point, not have to couch their praise in caveats about the Roseanne of it all.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Fallon
    It has a strong sense of its identity, why people are tuning in, and it delivers that without pandering or patronizing. That’s a hard thing to do, and, for all the sledgehammer emotional twists the show is known for, proves it delicately.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    Few shows are laid out this intricately or methodically, and the callbacks as the series progresses are gratifying and worth the effort of paying attention. This goes for Fukunaga’s winking, sumptuous direction; Stone and Hill’s challenging, ultimately miraculous performances; and Somerville’s tangled scripts. The process of uncoiling the knots might piss you off, but achieving it in the end feels like an accomplishment. Even if the achievement ends up being not as profound as you thought it might be.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Kevin Fallon
    Sorry For Your Loss is a gem of a show. With a cast this impressive--in Olsen, an Avenger; in Tran, a Star Wars alum; in McTeer, a renowned Oscar nominee--a series this well-executed would ordinarily be a marquee entry in the fall TV season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Kevin Fallon
    Forever is a wonderful, truly special show. ... Few have made us stop completely, let alone deeply reconsider our thoughts about, well... life. It was a thrilling experience, which is strange for a show this quiet and meditative.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    Vignettes of people reacting to the world’s end carried more emotional heft than Horror Story is known for, and the depravity that follows doomsday is, as depicted here, suitably chilling. Yet at the same time, we’re watching Leslie Grossman shriek hilariously entitled freakouts and Joan Collins purr sassy one-liners while a Ryan Murphy-approved troupe of impeccably bone-structured twinks preen in fabulous clothes (and occasionally without!). It’s fun!
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Fallon
    Female characters are now taking center stage, both in the show and in their own lives. Seizing that agency doesn’t come easily, of course, but it’s their struggle for it and even just their awakening to its possibility that it is gratifying to watch. ... The empowerment of these women makes the show’s study of masculinity all the richer, complicating the pimp characters and the work of their performers. ... A highlight of this fall’s dizzying TV lineup.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    The personal toll the demand of celebrity takes on someone desperate for real connection. An audience’s insistence that the connection they have to someone on TV is real, and can’t be shattered. They are provocative, meta conversations raised especially by having Carrey in this role, and they elevate the show even as its quirkier dramedy subthreads begin to run amok.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    It’s shot beautifully, is occasionally engagingly weird, and is well-acted by Penn and McElhone, especially. The issue is that it’s just fine. It’s the kind of show you could quickly watch every episode of--Hulu will release all eight episodes at once--and then completely forget you ever saw. It makes that little of an emotional impression, and does nothing particularly remarkable, revolutionary, or resonant with its storytelling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    Until it picks up narrative steam almost two-thirds of the way through the season, Jack Ryan is rote television: blandly entertaining.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Kevin Fallon
    Insatiable is a harsh example of the best intentions yielding the worst results. ... Insatiable is unforgivably inelegant as satire. It fails not only to land its purportedly progressive message about body image and weight, but also its storylines tackling sexuality, sexual agency, classism, race, and transgender acceptance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Kevin Fallon
    Everything Big Little Lies did to embrace, dignify, and elevate the soap opera genre’s female characters and tropes, Sharp Objects does with pulp mystery. ... Elegant, compulsively watchable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    It’s nice to see people from different walks of life learn to understand each other. But it’s just as beautiful to see members of a community come together to support one of their own who needs them. After two seasons of the new Queer Eye, we’re seeing the revival reach its full potential: being equally skilled at doing both.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    The new revival isn’t perfect, especially in the tone-deaf (and arguably offensive) way in which Tambor’s controversy is mirrored in his character’s, George Sr.’s, story arc. But it also goes a long way to absolve the sins of that first Netflix revival, sins we can forget, but are still a ways away from forgiving. ... Our advice is to just surrender yourself to the constant confusion and instead take pleasure in the clever writing.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    There’s nothing to push the narrative gas pedal in this first half of season two. You’re spending hours and hours watching characters wait for something to happen, for something shocking to come out of the trial. You’re waiting, too. ... This is a show that mostly succeeds at blurring the lines between protagonists and villains, to the point that we’re even forced to sit through the character assassination of Hannah in court and question what we thought we knew about her.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    Extremely funny. ... While the premiere is heavily political, that does die down in subsequent episodes, though the show’s “edginess” doesn’t. We put that in quotes because the renegade way in which the show courted controversy decades ago has now, thanks to the doors it kicked open, become normalized.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    Neither an endorsement nor an indictment, but this reboot so aggressively plays down the middle that it doesn’t seem to be seeking one either way.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    The Queer Eye reboot finds perhaps even more pathos than the original one. The transformation in the premiere episode is a heartwarming hoot. But with a cast of attention-seeking experts who too often steal focus from the proverbial mission at hand, it can be as exhausting and, at times, even as cringe-inducing as some have feared.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Kevin Fallon
    A cacophony of celebrity ego, bombastic production, and misguided cruelty, The Four purports to reinvent the singing-competition TV series for a modern audience and industry but is actually the worst kind of derivative: the kind with the irritating braggadocio of thinking it’s fresh. And, because it bears repeating, it doesn’t even showcase much good singing!
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    Ultimately, and in the most absurd (and therefore enticingly watchable) of manners, The End of the F***ing World is a heartwarming romance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    The result, 9-1-1, a drama centering around the first responders to emergencies, is as outrageous as you’d expect from a Murphy production: Babies flushed down toilets! Snakes getting beheaded! Connie Britton with bad hair! But it’s also depressingly derivative and middle-of-the-road.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    [Matthew Broderick's] wry delivery, always somewhere on a spectrum from understated to unenthused, serves the story well, tempering the erstwhile loudness of the musical’s staging. ... The latent grin of the music is relentless to the point of off-putting, especially considering that nothing from the score sticks in your head long enough to keep you humming once the curtain falls
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    There’s something casual in the way it is both riveting and fun.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Kevin Fallon
    While it might be frustrating to have sat through nearly 300 minutes of television only to realize not much has happened, the Duffer Brothers have constructed such a rich, vibrant universe and populated it with such entertaining characters--those kids really are a hoot--that it’s still fun to go along for the ride, slower though it is.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    There are comforting pleasures in the return of Curb Your Enthusiasm. Cheryl Hines is back and her character is on pleasant terms with ex-husband Larry. ... But the derangement of the comedy might be the most satisfying returning element.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    Relax. The new episodes are certainly more political and even a little gayer than we expected, but just as funny and nostalgic as we hoped they would be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Kevin Fallon
    That might be the crux of the problem with Jerry Before Seinfeld. It’s certainly pleasant, and anyone who is a fan of his will chuckle their way through it. But it’s unclear what we’re being sold here.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Kevin Fallon
    The concept for Tuesday night’s premiere of American Horror Story: Cult is so on-the-nose it can only be called brilliant. ... A murder investigation (led by Colton Haynes), and also a dizzying array of new plot points that distract from what works the best about this standout first episode: the crippling battle between politics and paranoia.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Kevin Fallon
    The curious thing about Snowfall is how glaringly the ask it is making of its viewers is at odds with the tension rising between the various players in the complicated drug ring depicted onscreen: an assumption of patience, and blind trust that it will deliver. ... The performances rise to the ambition of the material, especially Idris in the lead role, Michael Hyatt as his protective mother, and Amin Joseph as his conflicted uncle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Kevin Fallon
    In addition to being OITNB’s riskiest season yet, this is also its messiest. The lows are pretty low. ... But the highs are the show at its best: profound and funny, and simultaneously spotlighting and elucidating the ways in which women and minorities are oppressed, villainized, and ignored, often all at once. Still, that surfaces the show’s most fatal and longest-running flaw. There are so many characters—too many, in fact.

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