For 57 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 77% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kim Hughes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 74
Lowest review score: 25 Night School
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 43 out of 57
  2. Negative: 2 out of 57
57 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    An interesting if rote, talking head–style film about a woman for whom fame was a constant battle but whose shadow stretched longer than her slight frame, a point highlighted often (if not always convincingly) throughout Suzi Q.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Let’s get this out of the way right up front: Force of Nature is fairly terrible albeit in some interesting ways that won’t change the way you think about film but will make a Monday night couch-sit more entertaining, if only to discuss the WTF elements while washing out the popcorn bowl.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    With its first half a kind of post-mortem of this so-called accidental masterpiece and the second devoted to its cultural influence on everyone from drag queens to film scholars, You Don’t Nomi — its title a snappy riff on lead character Elizabeth Berkley’s name — is impressive for its breadth and depth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 91 Kim Hughes
    Semi-comic tales don’t come blacker or more twisted than writer/director Mirrah Foulkes’ quietly electrifying Judy & Punch, which might be subtitled “When Scumbags Get Bigtime Comeuppance.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    A bittersweet dramedy about an exceedingly fraught mother/daughter relationship and the ties that nevertheless bind, Tammy’s Always Dying is buoyed by a superb cast and a palpably stark setting (mostly Hamilton, Ontario with forays into Toronto) that combine to elevate the film above its more predictable aspects.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    It would be swell if there was a way of describing Bloodshot that unscrambled its plot while making it sound staggeringly cool but… well, we can’t all be superheroes. Neat effects though, which maybe are the most important thing in a sci-fi actioner?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    It means well, but Greed fails to locate the heart of the fast-fashion calamity, instead spotlighting the grotesqueness of the one percent at the expense of everyone else.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    As much a showcase for Kristen Stewart and the fabulous frocks of the 1960s as a glimpse at a very low moment in U.S. governmental history, Seberg is an entertaining if simplistic drama that would have benefited from more grit and less gloss.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    A compact drama with outsize emotional heft, The Assistant is propelled as much by what it doesn’t show as what it does.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    The Rhythm Section is especially disappointing given its strong cast in front of and behind the scenes and its obvious ambition to rise above a paint-by-numbers action film with a somewhat relatable protagonist.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    The Last Full Measure stands as a fascinating document of how truly messed up every aspect of the Vietnam War was. It’s also a touching if occasionally syrupy rumination on the nature and provenance of valor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Bombshell is recommended; it’s a fun watch, often surprisingly funny, and snappily directed by Jay Roach (Trumbo, Dinner for Schmucks). Plus, it’s always entertaining to see actors summon well-known real people in a persuasive way. But given what it is and the climate it’s arriving into, it could have been so much more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    It’s impossible to overstate the immersive feel and psychological sway of 1917; Mendes inhabits those god-forsaken trenches in ways that are palpable, bringing the stink, filth, claustrophobia, and gallows humour to bear with stunning resonance.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Overblown, outrageous, exceedingly (at times giddily) violent and visually exhausting — does any of this sounds familiar? — the film is, to borrow a hackneyed phrase which somehow seems appropriate in this context, all sizzle and no steak.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    Despite its virtues and intriguingly complicated morality, Queen & Slim never rises above its initial premise which is so not credible that it hoovers all ensuing tension from the rest of the film. Ridiculous can’t sustain a two hour–plus running time, and the stronger the filmmakers stick with their fire-breathing idea, the more frustrating Queen & Slim becomes, stomping out any connection to a reality most of us would recognize.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    The very opposite of kinetic, director Fernando Meirelles’ (City of God) The Two Popes is a slow-moving, ruminative, dialog-driven think piece set to film which might enjoy a successful second life as a stage production, and might actually be better served by that forum.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    The Cave may be the saddest, most infuriating chronicle of the ghastly ravages of war on a country’s most vulnerable citizens —children — ever made.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    A conceptual mess if a somewhat engaging one.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    It’s entertainment as fast food, though perhaps slightly less objectionable than the horrors perpetuated by KFC.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Wild Rose may not be what the summer season typically delivers to cinemas, but audiences miss it at their peril.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Kim Hughes
    Clumsily told yet intriguing because of its singular subject, Halston — director Frédéric Tcheng’s knock-kneed documentary on the pioneering American fashion designer ubiquitous in the 1970s, who made haute couture both aspirational and accessible — offers a trove of pop culture trivia.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Rocketman is as fabulously mercurial and debauched as its subject; anything less would have been futile and disappointing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    The high school rite-of-passage film canon may have been raided here but its thieves — screenwriters Susanna Fogel, Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins, and Katie Silberman, doubtless abetted by producers Will Ferrell and Adam McKay — have wrung every drop of weird, contradictory, and squeamish fun out of the teenage experience.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    A dynamite ensemble cast and a truckload of heart keep the sentimental new comedy POMS from crumbling beneath multiple well-thumbed clichés including (but not limited to) plucky underdogs can triumph, friends are really important and life is short so live it fully.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    The Public, which played at TIFF last fall, is the kind of movie you want to like and that probably needs to get made and seen. But needing to see something and wanting to see it are different things.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    A compelling story that’s well-acted, well-written, and beautifully shot is its own reward. The female perspective is pretty neat, too.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    The film brings great heart while underscoring ties between family, friends and, crucially, between humans and the wider environmental world in a way likely to resonate with tweens and teens in North America as it has already successfully done internationally.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    For all its cinematic bell and whistles, something about Dumbo feels hollow (I wrote that word three times in my notebook during the screening) as if it’s mouthing the proverbial words phonetically without knowing their meaning. Perhaps I walked into the theatre with too-high expectations. I slinked out with shoulders bowed.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Quiet, understated and unforgettable, The Mustang is a winner by five lengths.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Kim Hughes
    The Hummingbird Project is a fun enough ride though one with significant logic bumps that may prove as intractable as the terrain its characters hope to traverse.

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