For 77 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 79% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kim Hughes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 A Simple Favor
Lowest review score: 25 Night School
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 60 out of 77
  2. Negative: 2 out of 77
77 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    It is at times a terrifically uncomfortable movie to watch. But director Michel Franco's New Order, a searing and relentlessly grim indictment of class division and government corruption, scans not only as possible but entirely likely given our current world. Heavy doesn’t begin to describe it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    People will either love Moby Doc or hate it, but absolutely no one will exit with a shrug. I’d call that an achievement.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    For viewers of this doc, Strike A Pose, though perhaps overly long and repetitive, is a touching reminder that we all occupy the same world and are vulnerable to its pitfalls… even those lucky (or unlucky) enough to have briefly dwelled in the shadow of the almighty Madonna.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    The starkly lit and shot film is a gently paced family drama about a collapsing marriage which, come to think of it, merits its horror-story veneer even if it is something of a red herring.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Visually drab, tonally flat, and with precious few sympathetic or relatable characters, Brothers by Blood reduces the high-minded concept of filial loyalty across multiple generations to a paint-by-numbers power play.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Sure, we’ve seen variations on this story and theme before but few better.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    For everything Senior Moment gets right, there seems to be an equal and corresponding wrong which mars the film and the efforts of its clearly committed cast under the helm of action director Giorgio Serafini.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    As a valentine to influential 80s alt-rockers The Smiths, Shoplifters of the World is unbeatable, propelled by original Smiths music along with archival footage of band interviews and performances, vintage posters, magazine covers, album sleeves and just about every other bit of era-specific ephemera you can name.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    It’s not for lack of trying as Crisis has a terrific ensemble cast doing terrific work. But the film never sparks or soars.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    But what lands with Land is underwhelming; not quite a disappointment but considerably less than what was hoped for given Wright’s professional toolkit and the endless possibilities a subject as complex as profound grief offers.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Beautifully shot and terribly sad, with a wildly twitchy score ratcheting up the tension, the Mexican drama Identifying Features is a profound statement about maternal love, brutal inequality, and institutional corruption.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Its warm-heartedness, positivity, and consistently striking visuals are a pleasant counter to ugly January days and nights, and a reminder that a compelling story well told is… wait for it… a can’t-miss recipe for success.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    The new documentary Billie is for music nerds what hieroglyphics on a cave wall are for anthropologists: not so much a revelation as clear confirmation of a more nuanced life than previously known. It also has one heck of a back story.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Strong performances abound while sly and sometimes slapstick comedy lightens the more intense themes of betrayal and vengeance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Wharton’s film benefits from exceptional timing, which may not be accidental. Carter’s diplomacy and decency, his easy smile and comparatively youthful veneer contrast dramatically with the current American president and his secretive, self-aggrandizing, circled-wagons administration.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    Approached with a casual regard for logic, period thriller The Secrets We Keep is entertaining enough to recommend though it never feels quite as original or shocking as the filmmakers — working with a plainly Hitchcockian roadmap — likely hoped for.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    A little distance — and considerable trimming — would have served the story better.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Kim Hughes
    Even I found the film’s 90-minute running time draining, its story needlessly, maddeningly convoluted. I also lamented missed opportunities for in-jokes, sly sub-references, even guerilla fourth-wall demolition hijinks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    A strong ensemble cast ably supports Jacobs as she navigates palpable feelings of inadequacy and misguided affection.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Spinster adds up to more than the sum of its parts, even if its primary takeaway — a woman doesn’t need a man to be happy and/or successful, yada yada — is hardly ground-breaking.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    An interesting if rote, talking head–style film about a woman for whom fame was a constant battle but whose shadow stretched longer than her slight frame, a point highlighted often (if not always convincingly) throughout Suzi Q.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Let’s get this out of the way right up front: Force of Nature is fairly terrible albeit in some interesting ways that won’t change the way you think about film but will make a Monday night couch-sit more entertaining, if only to discuss the WTF elements while washing out the popcorn bowl.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    With its first half a kind of post-mortem of this so-called accidental masterpiece and the second devoted to its cultural influence on everyone from drag queens to film scholars, You Don’t Nomi — its title a snappy riff on lead character Elizabeth Berkley’s name — is impressive for its breadth and depth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 91 Kim Hughes
    Semi-comic tales don’t come blacker or more twisted than writer/director Mirrah Foulkes’ quietly electrifying Judy & Punch, which might be subtitled “When Scumbags Get Bigtime Comeuppance.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    A bittersweet dramedy about an exceedingly fraught mother/daughter relationship and the ties that nevertheless bind, Tammy’s Always Dying is buoyed by a superb cast and a palpably stark setting (mostly Hamilton, Ontario with forays into Toronto) that combine to elevate the film above its more predictable aspects.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    It would be swell if there was a way of describing Bloodshot that unscrambled its plot while making it sound staggeringly cool but… well, we can’t all be superheroes. Neat effects though, which maybe are the most important thing in a sci-fi actioner?
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    It means well, but Greed fails to locate the heart of the fast-fashion calamity, instead spotlighting the grotesqueness of the one percent at the expense of everyone else.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    As much a showcase for Kristen Stewart and the fabulous frocks of the 1960s as a glimpse at a very low moment in U.S. governmental history, Seberg is an entertaining if simplistic drama that would have benefited from more grit and less gloss.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    A compact drama with outsize emotional heft, The Assistant is propelled as much by what it doesn’t show as what it does.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    The Rhythm Section is especially disappointing given its strong cast in front of and behind the scenes and its obvious ambition to rise above a paint-by-numbers action film with a somewhat relatable protagonist.

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