For 107 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 78% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 19% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kim Hughes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 77
Highest review score: 100 Being the Ricardos
Lowest review score: 25 Night School
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 86 out of 107
  2. Negative: 2 out of 107
107 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    McDonagh’s sumptuous version of the novel —which premiered at TIFF last year — is utterly faithful and thus note perfect, capturing its resonant ruminations on social inequity, racism, and cultural tourism in a sweeping Moroccan desert Sheltering Sky novelist Paul Bowles would recognize.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Fans of the novels of Jane Austen or the Netflix series Bridgerton will swoon with delight at Mr. Malcolm's List, a romance-slash-drama also set in early 19th century London that, like the beforementioned titles, is filled to bursting with dashing bachelors, scheming social climbers, fancy balls, innumerable frocks with empire waists, and pointed commentary on the British class system.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    If themes about the importance of friendship, hope, and love land a bit on the nose, there’s no denying Brian and Charles takes an innovative approach to delivering them, even if — see above — the tack is brazenly metaphorical. Yet its distinctive charms are resonant enough to offset a slender story in what nevertheless amounts to a sweet and earnest, modern-day fable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Kim Hughes
    Where New Order broadly surveyed and compartmentalized Mexico’s upper and lower classes, Sundown pretty much rests its entire narrative on one man, wealthy British business owner Neil Bennett — played with few words but (oxymoron alert) riveting impassivity by Tim Roth.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    It’s a tough slog, this film, partly because it delivers its arguments with a sledgehammer, and partly because we know what it’s saying is true.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Not even its rather silly ending can undermine its heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    American drama Jockey is superb, the perfect confluence of a great story expertly directed, with outstanding performances, stunning cinematography, and a dazzling score.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Dinklage’s performance here is crushingly sad, and he is never more persuasive than as a man convinced he is unworthy of love despite his substantial social standing and towering intellect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    The Matrix Resurrections is an incoherent, narratively sloppy mess.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    It’s not clear what Clooney’s hope for his film was, but presumably it was grander than what lands on the screen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    Visually opulent as only a Guillermo del Toro movie can be with gorgeously detailed, period-perfect costumes and interiors and a marquee cast, the noir thriller Nightmare Alley checks all the grand boxes of the genre. Yet the film feels emotionally inert, stacked with unsympathetic, strangely uncharismatic characters that defy empathy. Or worse: defy abiding interest.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Given the devotion Ball continues to inspire in fans, it was perhaps too great a challenge for anyone to live up to casting expectations. Still, Being the Ricardos hits all the right notes, making these larger-than-life people seem at once pointedly human and even more ground-breaking than ever.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Kim Hughes
    While sticking close to the tried-and-true talking head documentary format, Harry Chapin: When In Doubt, Do Something — the title inspired by Chapin’s maxim in life and oft-uttered motto — succeeds in celebrating a life truly worth celebrating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Those ambivalent towards children may find the film positively tedious. Those in tune with its up-close storytelling and gentle pace may find much to enjoy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Encanto is just so lovely to look at that its story, while well-told, is almost secondary. You honestly just want to crawl inside the screen, wear Mirabel’s swooshing skirts, pet those donkeys, sniff those flowers, and chow down on that grilled corn. Wonder and imagination are in abundant supply.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    In parlance its subject would have understood, the documentary The Capote Tapes, about iconic American writer Truman Capote, feels like something late to the party and underdressed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    It’s a testament to director Will Sharpe’s vision and humanity that a story predicated on mental illness, poverty, death, and heartbreak ultimately comes across as hopeful and lovely — whimsical even — while looking gorgeous on the screen.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    It may not be quite as thrilling as Edgar Wright’s brilliant The Sparks Brothers, which had the benefit of two still-living, sharp-as-tacks protagonists to interview, but it’s a must-see for fans and a highly interesting two hours for music junkies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    A sad, poignant, dialogue-driven film destined for successful post-film life as a theatre production, writer/director Fran Kranz’s debut about two sets of parents on opposing sides of a tragedy locates the humanity in the seemingly endless, peculiarly American saga of school shootings. It also celebrates forgiveness.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Kim Hughes
    Rarely do remakes capture the lightning in the bottle of the source material. But The Guilty does, no doubt in part because screenwriter Nic Pizzolatto, best known for the True Detective series, drafted Gustav Möller, who wrote the original screenplay for and directed the original. Whether a remake was needed remains debatable, but the vision remains intact.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    Starry actioner The Protégé is a filmic version of empty calories: irresistible if short on sustenance and of an ilk that’s best rationed carefully.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Taken either as a metaphor for mourning or as a straight-up fictional narrative with a paranormal bent, The Night House’s ending is as disturbing — and intriguing — as it gets.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Lorelei is a lovely story told with heart and without judgment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Old
    I have not read the graphic novel Sandcastle upon which Old is based so I can’t vouch for its faithfulness to the source material. But it’s hard to believe anyone would call this a winner.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kim Hughes
    Director Nick Moran gets the temperature of the era mostly right, and effectively weaves this extraordinary source material into a watchable if formulaic two hours.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    Even those resistant to Gunda’s vegetarian message would be hard-pressed to describe these creatures cavalierly having witnessed these exquisitely framed, highly meditative moments. We see life within these beings, and we witness their undeniable will to live. And it’s beautiful. Gunda is truly one of a kind.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    The Loneliest Whale is gripping and highly persuasive, blending hard science with real-life action/adventure sequences, talking-head interviews, and — sorry, sorry — a whale of a true story that has been headline news for years.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Kim Hughes
    When the creepy conflux of the title occurs, it’s terrifying because its conclusion is unforeseeable. Like life you might say: impossible to predict but nevertheless captivating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Kim Hughes
    There is a bristling, neon energy to Zola which, given its provenance as a series of real-life tweets from waitress and exotic dancer (and now executive producer) A’ziah “Zola” King, seems about right. This is a road trip movie straight outta weirdsville.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Kim Hughes
    Impossible odds and a furious deadline have propelled many great and not-so-great action films. Those factors are very much at play in The Ice Road, which stars Liam Neeson, several big rigs, and the province of Manitoba in a thriller that, though by-the-numbers in execution, boasts a watchable enough premise.

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