Kimberley Jones

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For 885 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 63 Up
Lowest review score: 0 Stealing Harvard
Score distribution:
885 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s a lot, but also very little: The action amounts to multiple variations on “try not to get wet, or caught out” to push along a plot that dispenses the usual life lessons about being brave and valuing friendship.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are a million reasons why couples break up. If only We Broke Up had landed on one, they might have really had something here.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The title, with its built-in weightiness ... well, it’s a tall order, one this latest Pixar animated feature falls just short of. The dominant mood here is not so much soulful as spirited, which is still better than most – and a most welcome gift.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The love match is cringing; as a rom-com’s raison d’etre, their limp connection pretty much sinks the thing. But when the script settles down and stops feeling quite so much like an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink thesis project, it has its bouncy moments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It smartly skips the goofier aspects of the original, too. Once you’ve shed musical numbers and Eddie Murphy cracking wise as a dragon, you’re in far less jocular territory...And that feels right for the material.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Mostly it will just make you hungry to revisit Ashman’s work. That’s perhaps not the intended result of this fond tribute/merely serviceable survey of a too-short career – but it’s not necessarily a bad one.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The plot isn’t sturdy enough to fill two hours. An honorable mention, but no best in show.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Odom Jr. won the Tony for his performance here, a fact that’s been somewhat dwarfed over the years by Miranda’s tsunamic success, but the neat trick of this filmed version is to time-machine viewers back to an extraordinary moment in American cultural history – to put us, to borrow from Miranda, in the room where it happened. It feels like such a gift.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    From the most generous angle, All I Can Say functions as a found footage précis of the perils of fast fame, illustrating Hoon’s deepening addictions as the band’s profile rises.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Shirley is probably too niche to attract the Academy’s interest in Moss – how has she never been nominated? – but it’s a big, messy, masterfully itchy performance and yet another notch in her belt.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I’m coming down harder than I meant to. If you’re a fan of the series – and I am – you’re still going to fan. (There’s no entry point for newcomers; it’s too in medias res.) The scenery is lush. There’s ever the pleasure in Steve and Rob’s company. I just wanted to feel by film’s end like I’d arrived somewhere new. Like the journey had been pulling me somewhere inevitable but still enlightening.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Still, it takes a special someone to sell this larger-than-life character onscreen, and to make you forgive how the galloping script glosses over some crucial beats.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Although the filmmaker’s presence in her own film is never remarked upon, I imagine she felt compelled by a feeling of kinship with the artist; Dyrschka, a first-time feature director, is the first filmmaker to profile af Klint, which is a notable achievement. But I don’t think we’ve had the definitive film portrait yet.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers’ decision to stay out of the way and shape the story largely in the editing room bears different returns – a less mediated, more immersive, and ultimately quite moving portrait of hopeful youths headed into a harder adulthood.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s thrilling.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The sensation that dogs Hope Gap is that they forgot to roll camera on the most dramatic parts. What’s left over isn’t bad, only underwhelming.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Neeson, taking a welcome break from his late-career reinvention as a man of action, and Manville (Another Year, Phantom Thread) are such gifted performers, and they play this couple – their tenderness and stress – at a likably subtle frequency.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Did I imagine a gloaming quality to this film, or was that just the influence of my own trudge toward middle age? That, of course, has been the steady brilliance of this series: No matter your own pace on life’s arc, you can always catch your reflection in the fishbowl glass.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Out of a terrific ensemble cast, Pugh (Midsommar, TV’s The Little Drummer Girl) emerges as the star.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 0 Kimberley Jones
    This is a vastly inferior toy-to-film IP expansion, with duller songs, dumber jokes, and forgettable voice work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What is notable is how the film gives children a framework, and the language, to process this act of violence, same as it does the pain of grief, the bitter rub of mortality. I don’t know if that sensitivity will translate to a gajillion more princess dresses sold, but as a teaching aid for kids – a tool for taking on more adult concerns – I found it surprisingly impactful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, the 84-year-old Maggie Smith is back as the Crawley materfamilias, and as ever she’s the MVP.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s only in the last quarter of the film, when Wang strays from her own family’s touchstones to explore a case of separated twins, that One Child Nation loses just a touch of its urgency.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The overall vibe is JV-squad swashbuckling, evoking "The Goonies" and the "Indiana Jones" films for a tweens-and-under demographic, and all without the exhausting quippiness of the "Lego" franchise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    In the Aisles is a triumph of mood, aided by an eclectic soundtrack that skips from Delta blues to electro-pop to Strauss and Donizetti, and a worthy stage for Rogowski to continue introducing himself to an international audience.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Graham’s film teems with fascinating characters – ultimately, too many for the abbreviated running time.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Twenty-four years ago, the original Toy Story broke ground as the first-ever entirely computer animated feature film. What’s more astonishing now is how all those ones and zeroes are harnessed to produce something so utterly lifelike.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    So yeah, Booksmart is a different kind of teen comedy – clever and buoyant, proudly feminist and wonderfully reassuring that, yeah, the kids are alright.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Oliver and director Ry Russo-Young (Before I Fall) cherry-pick a few of these digressions and give them an artful, collage-like treatment; they don’t go far enough to mask the skimpiness of the story, which has been whittled down to Natasha and Daniel almost exclusively.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    If the film’s conclusion reads a touch too much like a sales pitch, I didn’t mind; the Chesters’ thoughtful approach to living in harmony with nature is one we should all buy into.

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