Kimberley Jones

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For 878 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Past
Lowest review score: 0 Zookeeper
Score distribution:
878 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The plot isn’t sturdy enough to fill two hours. An honorable mention, but no best in show.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Odom Jr. won the Tony for his performance here, a fact that’s been somewhat dwarfed over the years by Miranda’s tsunamic success, but the neat trick of this filmed version is to time-machine viewers back to an extraordinary moment in American cultural history – to put us, to borrow from Miranda, in the room where it happened. It feels like such a gift.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    From the most generous angle, All I Can Say functions as a found footage précis of the perils of fast fame, illustrating Hoon’s deepening addictions as the band’s profile rises.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Shirley is probably too niche to attract the Academy’s interest in Moss – how has she never been nominated? – but it’s a big, messy, masterfully itchy performance and yet another notch in her belt.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I’m coming down harder than I meant to. If you’re a fan of the series – and I am – you’re still going to fan. (There’s no entry point for newcomers; it’s too in medias res.) The scenery is lush. There’s ever the pleasure in Steve and Rob’s company. I just wanted to feel by film’s end like I’d arrived somewhere new. Like the journey had been pulling me somewhere inevitable but still enlightening.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Still, it takes a special someone to sell this larger-than-life character onscreen, and to make you forgive how the galloping script glosses over some crucial beats.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Although the filmmaker’s presence in her own film is never remarked upon, I imagine she felt compelled by a feeling of kinship with the artist; Dyrschka, a first-time feature director, is the first filmmaker to profile af Klint, which is a notable achievement. But I don’t think we’ve had the definitive film portrait yet.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    The filmmakers’ decision to stay out of the way and shape the story largely in the editing room bears different returns – a less mediated, more immersive, and ultimately quite moving portrait of hopeful youths headed into a harder adulthood.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It’s thrilling.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    The sensation that dogs Hope Gap is that they forgot to roll camera on the most dramatic parts. What’s left over isn’t bad, only underwhelming.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Neeson, taking a welcome break from his late-career reinvention as a man of action, and Manville (Another Year, Phantom Thread) are such gifted performers, and they play this couple – their tenderness and stress – at a likably subtle frequency.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Kimberley Jones
    Did I imagine a gloaming quality to this film, or was that just the influence of my own trudge toward middle age? That, of course, has been the steady brilliance of this series: No matter your own pace on life’s arc, you can always catch your reflection in the fishbowl glass.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Out of a terrific ensemble cast, Pugh (Midsommar, TV’s The Little Drummer Girl) emerges as the star.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 0 Kimberley Jones
    This is a vastly inferior toy-to-film IP expansion, with duller songs, dumber jokes, and forgettable voice work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    What is notable is how the film gives children a framework, and the language, to process this act of violence, same as it does the pain of grief, the bitter rub of mortality. I don’t know if that sensitivity will translate to a gajillion more princess dresses sold, but as a teaching aid for kids – a tool for taking on more adult concerns – I found it surprisingly impactful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Yes, the 84-year-old Maggie Smith is back as the Crawley materfamilias, and as ever she’s the MVP.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    It’s only in the last quarter of the film, when Wang strays from her own family’s touchstones to explore a case of separated twins, that One Child Nation loses just a touch of its urgency.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The overall vibe is JV-squad swashbuckling, evoking "The Goonies" and the "Indiana Jones" films for a tweens-and-under demographic, and all without the exhausting quippiness of the "Lego" franchise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    In the Aisles is a triumph of mood, aided by an eclectic soundtrack that skips from Delta blues to electro-pop to Strauss and Donizetti, and a worthy stage for Rogowski to continue introducing himself to an international audience.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Graham’s film teems with fascinating characters – ultimately, too many for the abbreviated running time.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Twenty-four years ago, the original Toy Story broke ground as the first-ever entirely computer animated feature film. What’s more astonishing now is how all those ones and zeroes are harnessed to produce something so utterly lifelike.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    So yeah, Booksmart is a different kind of teen comedy – clever and buoyant, proudly feminist and wonderfully reassuring that, yeah, the kids are alright.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Oliver and director Ry Russo-Young (Before I Fall) cherry-pick a few of these digressions and give them an artful, collage-like treatment; they don’t go far enough to mask the skimpiness of the story, which has been whittled down to Natasha and Daniel almost exclusively.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    If the film’s conclusion reads a touch too much like a sales pitch, I didn’t mind; the Chesters’ thoughtful approach to living in harmony with nature is one we should all buy into.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    The script, and Theron, matter-of-factly illustrate the old adage about Ginger Rogers, that she did everything Astaire did, only backwards and in heels. That the film actually gives her credit for it? That’s the best kind of wish fulfillment fantasy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    A thriller wants to entertain you. Little Woods wants you to think, and feel. I did both.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    That spiky aunt is played by Estelle Parsons (Bonnie & Clyde); one of the pleasures of Diane is the rare platform it gives older actresses, including Andrea Martin, Phyllis Somerville, and Deirdre O’Connell.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    If Dumbo 2.0 does have to exist, then you could do far worse than this sweet and occasionally quite nifty revamping.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Gloria Bell is its own thing. Lelio inflects the film with a believably Californian vibe, all washed-out easiness, and the faint feeling that so much easiness must take an awful lot of work. And Moore can so exquisitely convey two emotions at once, the actorly equivalent of patting a head and rubbing a stomach at the same time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    These dragons are rendered so expressively, and they have become so dear. We may not deserve them, but that doesn’t stop the heart from wanting.

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