Kimberley Jones

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For 839 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kimberley Jones' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Phantom Thread
Lowest review score: 0 Someone Like You...
Score distribution:
839 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    In the House, from the eclectic French filmmaker François Ozon (Under the Sand, 8 Women), is an almost perverse delight, an egghead thriller that slyly shell-games its truer purpose as an inquiry into the construction – and deconstruction – of fiction. Scratch deconstruction: Make that tear-the-house-down demolition.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The all-around excellent cast swings with aplomb from silly to sweet.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Screenwriters Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and fanboys’ favorite whipping boy, Damon Lindelof, keep the film moving at a quippy clip; there’s really no fat here until the film feints a climax only to lurch the coaster-car back up the hill again.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Luhrmann has always had a knack with the fever of passion, but here he only catches high fever’s empty gibberish.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Blancanieves never lags, per se, it’s just awfully in love with itself: with its gorgeous black and white chiaroscuros and whirling-dervish first-person camera perspectives, the Spanish-guitar-scored dance sequences (that include the undeniable dance of the matador in action), and battering winds of emotional extremes. By the end of this sumptuous and sincerely felt melodrama, I was rather in love with it, too.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    I’m not saying there isn’t comic gold to be mined in the topic of cunnilingus and the senior set, but The Big Wedding couldn’t hit pay dirt even if it face-palmed the film first.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    Mud
    With American independent film teeming with so many shaky-cam snarksters, what an electric riposte to the status quo is Nichols, whose films are classically constructed and deadly serious. In his short but potent career, he’s mastered a wide-vistaed eye for the epic and the elemental.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    Berger’s low-key, likable ensemble film flares with brilliance in its framing concept.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    I suspect a second viewing would uncover more information embedded in the mise-en-scène; had Trance – tonally a jumble and disorienting to the point of distraction – rewarded the audience with the pure perfection of a Keyser Söze-like reveal, I’d be more inclined to make the return trip.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    There are no hard answers in Room 237, a feature-length, sporadically engaging exploration of the latter (The Shining).
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    This film adaptation feels like YA, with cat’s-cradle love matches, soft-focus sexuality, and a main character who never satisfactorily makes the transition from page to screen.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    Back to that question of medium: Scrubbed of the few, ill-fitting four-letter words that earned it an R, Language of a Broken Heart might have made a passable Hallmark or Lifetime TV movie, cushioned by the TV-movie context. But as a theatrical prospect, it’s a fail.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Once the film gets cooking, the questions never stop. For instance: When you find the dead body of someone you love, isn’t your first call to the cops?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    A spirited and eye-popping stealth charmer.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    It’s clear this director sees carnage as nothing more than an opportunity for music-video production values.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kimberley Jones
    Lucas and Moore aren’t savvy enough, or brave enough, to truly plumb the gallows humor embedded in their premise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    The former mayor is an alert onscreen presence, but the film surrounding him is not always so lively.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    And yet that is what is so very remarkable about the film: In a slim 72 minutes, it heart-tethers us to these teenagers, paying tribute to their unique and private selves while allowing the audience to see its own reflection in them.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    The leads project a sunny patina of wholesomeness and share marvelous tans, but beyond that, it’s a shrugging love match.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    With "50/50," his last stint in the director's chair, Levine upended convention to make a feel-good cancer movie. He's still defying expectations: In animating the inner workings of the undead, he's made a movie that is both clever and heartfelt.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 Kimberley Jones
    I have never doodled during a movie before in my life, but holy hell, Parker's two-hour running time takes a lifetime. Plenty of time for mental doodling, too.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 Kimberley Jones
    In Movie 43's better-suited afterlife in the home-entertainment market, those sort of quandaries can be hashed out between bong rips and bags of Cheetos.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 11 Kimberley Jones
    In his English-language debut, Wirkola dabbles in everything but commits to nothing, making for an unmemorable brew best left untasted.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 0 Kimberley Jones
    By eliminating the winking, broad strokes of the filmmakers' more successful spoofs, they've made a film that is not only dumb, but dull. It's like watching a snuff film, only it's the audience who's dying inside.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 89 Kimberley Jones
    It's a mistake to confuse Zero Dark Thirty for "truth" – that would be a disservice to the high level of craftsmanship, from first-billed actors to below-the-line production crew, at work in this movie fiction – but there is admirably little fat on its bones.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    First, to dispel the two talking points attending The Impossible, Juan Antonio Bayona's dramatization of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: No, it's not racist, and no, you don't have to be a parent to feel the film in your bones.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Kimberley Jones
    Fine to look at, but good luck feeling anything.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Kimberley Jones
    When Les Misérables is good, it is very, very good, and when it is bad, it's usually because Russell Crowe has opened his mouth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    Does Apatow understand his heroes are assholes?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Kimberley Jones
    It is certainly competent, lovely to look at, but leaves little lasting impression.

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