For 96 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lee Marshall's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Dogman
Lowest review score: 30 Correspondence (La corrispondenza)
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 66 out of 96
  2. Negative: 1 out of 96
96 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    Melodrama is a neglected genre, often delivered with a post-modern twist these days. Brazilian director Karim Aïnouz proves in this stirring, heart-wrenching period film that it can be served straight up and still work a treat.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    Rambling but strangely compelling, Oh Mercy!’s documentary bedrock gives the investigation at the heart of the film a real authenticity. From around its midpoint, this uneven film becomes a riveting, compassionate interrogation drama.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Lee Marshall
    Audiences will likely approach the film a series of sketches linked as much by mood as by theme. Some hit the spot, two or three are laugh-out-loud funny, but others seem little more than space-fillers in a film that is both enjoyable and frustrating.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lee Marshall
    Only in certain scenes do story and ideas really mesh
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    The Lighthouse provides a marvellous chamber-drama platform for two actors, Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe, who seize the opportunity with gusto.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Lee Marshall
    Mixing tough US social realism with butch femme poses is an intriguing exercise, although this small, sincere drama never quite resolves the awkwardness of the meld.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    An angry skewering of today’s gig economy as well as a moving drama about a loving family on the verge of implosion which is easily is one of Loach’s very best films.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    If the village’s utter isolation feels unlikely, that’s because The Sower is in one sense a dream, the enactment of a myth that goes back to Ancient Greece and beyond.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Lee Marshall
    Piranhas feels a bit like a teen movie that just happens to have a Cammora backdrop, rather than a serious, nuanced drama about the paranza system – essentially, the grooming of underage kids as drug runners and Mafia footsoldiers.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    Singh busts rhymes with the best of them in this energetic, entertaining film that smuggles some urgent social themes in under the cover of a hoary old fable about a handsome pauper who gets the stardom and the girl.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Lee Marshall
    Deep down this is a conventional and predictably plotted period drama about a clash between bodice-ripping passion and social mores.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    It’s the shocking disjunct between his religion and the rabid nationalism of his sermons, writings and declarations that powers Schroeder’s conventional but nevertheless effective long hard stare into the eyes of intolerance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    Shot with grace and sensitivity in black and white using available and natural light, What You Gonna Do is a visual treat, the easiest on the eye of all the director’s films to date. It is also, for all its unevenness, a stirring, committed portrait of black lives at a crossroads in the American South.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    In its austere way, this is classic Wiseman, a film that takes us into the heart of a community and reveals its inner workings, comforts, fractures and traumas. It’s also a fine example of the way the director sculpts and moulds his material to create an arc that is both dramatic and poetic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    The result is a fascinating but also in some ways frustrating film, a game of tag that looks resoundingly cinematic but feels like more of a cable or VOD prospect - not least because it lacks the killer punch, the Bannon stumble or revelation that would make American Dharma newsworthy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    Can a film be baffling and rewarding at the same time? Can a stimulating cinematic experience co-exist with the suspicion that the filmmaker has deliberately set out to frustrate the audience? For all who believe the answer to those questions can be ‘yes’, then Sunset (Napszállta), second film by Son of Saul director László Nemes provides a rich seam to explore.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    The prolific French director clearly needed to breeze through this one – and the breeziness is infectious.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Lee Marshall
    The Favourite is one of those rare films where the energy generated by three talents at the top of their game and the energy generated by their characters swirl and merge in a perfect storm.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Lee Marshall
    There are more engaging fireworks, or at least small sparks, when the film begins to dig into the feelings, friendships and jealousies of its two main protagonists.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Lee Marshall
    Some of the credit must go to the stellar casting and performances. It’s difficult to single out one of the six actors in this alternative family unit as it’s a true ensemble display. But Kore-eda’s deft command of tone is a key factor too.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    If it doesn’t tie many (or any) of these thematic strands with a neat bow, that’s in the nature of a film that chooses raw dramatic power over narrative finesse.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lee Marshall
    It’s a small, worthy, film that works reasonably well, although there’s something a little too linear about its structure.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    Those who have the patience to go with its ravishing flow will find ample rewards, as Long Day’s Journey is a beautiful, smoulderingly romantic film.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Lee Marshall
    A mid-budget mis-fire after the director’s promising indie debut, Bang Gang, Girls of the Sun seems more concerned with staging sisterly bonding sessions amidst the rubble than in developing what might have been an intriguing story – about how war can reshuffle social and gender inequality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Lee Marshall
    Perhaps the most impressive thing about a hugely impressive exercise in directorial control is the fact that we come away from an intensely violent film, a film where bones crunch and blood smells, touched by pathos and a strange sense of hope.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    There’s plenty to admire in this trim, nearly dialogue-free 97-minute drama, not least Mads Mikkelsen’s raw performance as a downed airman waiting for rescue in the Arctic wastes, and the widescreen majesty of the Icelandic landscapes that stand in for the film’s polar setting.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Lee Marshall
    There’s an observational authenticity that is refreshing in an audiovisual culture whose attempts at self-analysis are too often skewed by melodrama. It’s also heartening to see such delicate stories of ordinary people come to the fore in a country whose filmmakers faces enormous hurdles; technical, financial and bureaucratic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Lee Marshall
    A film that is a small delight, a perfect cinematic short story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Lee Marshall
    A little too jaunty and picaresque at times, Bye Bye Germany is nevertheless, when it hits its stride, an entertaining, watchable take on the oppressed-minority-comeback genre (“We’re the Jewish revenge”, as one of the salesmen bitterly quips), shadowed at every turn by an unspeakable horror.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Lee Marshall
    One of the many pleasures of this understated drama is its slow-burn magnetism and lack of flashy genre posturing.

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