For 1,688 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Happy-Go-Lucky
Lowest review score: 0 People Like Us
Score distribution:
1688 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Both complex and rawly immediate, All the Beauty and the Bloodshed, Laura Poitras’s film about the 69-year-old photographic artist and activist Nan Goldin, is a great documentary and maybe the most essential film of the year.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    Without having spent enough time to establish the background of the characters and their conflicted motives, Hunt leaves us bystanders to the mayhem.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Please Baby Please has one thing going for it: A chance to watch gifted actors do some daredevil freestyling. In moments, it’s almost enough.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    EO
    What draws us in is the inventive and luminous cinematography from Michal Dymek (with additional footage by Pawel Edelman and Michal Englert), using drone shots, fish-eye lenses and red and blue filters. Accompanied by an unsettling electronic score, the donkey-in-a-disco effect is trippy, a hallucinogenic projection of what it might be like to live in an animal’s consciousness, including its dreams and flashbacks.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The documentary, Goodnight Oppy, is the sort of film you expect to see at your local museum or science center for school-age children. It’s a real-life Wall-E story, that’s easy to follow, full of emotion and Hollywood budget, and intended to elicit wonder and admiration for the National Aeronautics and Space Association.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director Sarin plays around a little with the candy-coloured palette, with lots of quick snapshots and backdrops (shot in Montreal and Mexico), giving the film a sort of photoplay episodic structure. But there’s little dramatic build-up.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Once again, [Pugh] brings a determined energy to her performance that almost compensates for the often unpersuasive, sometimes stilted, film built around her.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    So, points for shoe-string filmmaking on several fronts. But however open-minded one might try to be, it’s hard to imagine how high, or how low, you’d have to be to recognize human beings in this grungy geek fantasy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The somewhat awkwardly titled documentary, The Return of Tanya Tucker: Featuring Brandi Carlile, turns out to be an accurate summary of a film that celebrates two women.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Most of the participants who knew Armstrong are dead and there’s something melancholy about realizing that the human being behind that voice is silent. What remains is a quality that Marsalis identifies as essential in Armstrong’s music, a gift which he was fully conscious of, conveying a “transcendent joy” through sound.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The film loses momentum as it settles into movie-of-the-week familiarity, detailing the activities of the Jane collective, some of which seem hardly credible, though historically accurate.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Billed misleadingly as a “romantic thriller,” the film is neither romantic nor especially thrilling. The characters are enigmatic to the point of superficiality, the relationships largely transactional, and the action toggles between languid and frazzled over two-and-a-quarter-hours. But with some reflective distance, away from the snap judgment of festivals, Stars at Noon proves a pretty interesting film, if a sometimes confusing one.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Sosa, who shared cinematography duties with two other women, Judy Phu and Monica Wise, depicts a world of humble beauty, of sunrises and dogs and chickens and weed-strewn lots. With a measured pacing (the film was edited by co-writer Isidore Bethel), she has created a film that is more like an elegy than a simple chronicle of events.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Walter Hill’s new film Dead for a Dollar is in some ways your grandpa’s Western, a big-sky drama full of horses, hats, guns, hairpin plot turns and an ensemble of colourfully drawn characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    Though the emotional appeal of this story of resistance to brutal repression is genuinely moving, the documentary has limitations in both style and content.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Gossamer thin in the plotting but playful and gorgeous to look at, it’s a warm message of midlife liberation.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At two hours of repetitive heists and costume changes, Bandit grows bloated and progressively tiresome.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Although it’s not a life-affirming or audience-flattering parable, the drama feels refreshingly raw and adult.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Purcell’s performance and ambition in reframing this foundational Australian tale are admirable. But her version of the story would be more resonant if it held more mystery and less message.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Directed by Alli Haapasalo and written by Ilona Ahti and Daniel Hakulinen, it is an empathetic, almost sociological portrait that could be shown in health class in a progressive high school.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    Within the back and forth of family squabbles and warm moments, there are also sprinkles of magic realist beauty.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What works as edgy comedy is determined by what you can get away with. Having introduced depression and virtual incest, I Love My Dad just isn’t adroit enough to find a credible happy ending escape hatch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    It’s a film that has some obvious parallels to Howard’s Apollo 13, a docudrama about a small group of endangered people in a claustrophobic space, with worldwide media attention on a rescue effort and a happy ending, thanks to technological ingenuity, courage, and collective effort.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    A wearying spoof, the film, with its Regency-era setting, takes a smart, sombre drama and turns it into a juvenile inanity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    These images tantalize, but without satisfying, like a trailer for a narrative that would work better as a long-form series.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Neptune Frost’s real triumph is the deployment of striking imagery, led by the production and costume design of Rwanda fashion designer, Cedric Mizero, mixing traditional and fashion-forward adornment with technological bric-a-brac (fairy lights on bicycle wheels, circuit boards as jewelry).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Beauty and loss hold hands in Dreaming Walls: Inside the Chelsea Hotel, an intimate and impressionistic documentary about New York’s storied Chelsea Hotel from Belgian filmmakers, Amélie van Elmbt and Maya Duverdier.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    At times, the film is unabashedly cloying, like a ASMR Forest Gump or a Minion with sensitivity training. But if you can get past that, there’s an admirable ingenuity to the technique, integrating live action and stop-motion with humour and an easy, natural flow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    It’s a neo-Western, a sensitively acted, heartfelt and ambitious drama which stumbles when it resembles an illustrated thesis about the legacy of the West.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    In essence, a 90-minute commercial for the festival, inviting audiences to come down to “the most kickass party in the world’ and “the world’s greatest backyard barbecue.”

Top Trailers