For 1,432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Lowest review score: 0 Georgia Rule
Score distribution:
1432 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The subject may be glum but there is something consistently pleasurable about Mouthpiece, a film that is both audacious in execution and relatable, even for those of us who don't live in women's bodies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The results are what might be best called “solid” journalism, with the occasional eye-brow raising surprise (Nixon wanted to firebomb the Brookings Institute?) There’s a wealth of archival, often familiar, television clips along with fresh interviews with some of the first-hand witnesses and participants.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The confrontations involve a lot of prolonged, quasi-slapstick bullet-spraying firefights, which are hard on windows… and on viewers’ patience.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Despite its grand-sounding title, The Fall of the American Empire is another trifle, a familiar harangue against human perfidy wrapped in a creaky farce.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    While most romantic melodramas and rom-coms play with the idea of destiny, the bittersweet Japanese oddity Asako I & II makes it something of a central character.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    The loss of two-dimensional artistry of the original has some compensation of human warmth.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    To some extent, the performances elevate the script.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 58 Liam Lacey
    The movie rattles through ninety minutes of episodic jolts, the visual style is jumbled. Distinctive only in having a better effects budget than your average demons-in-the-attic quickie. While the super-parody elements offer a few snorts of amusement, the movie avoids taking on more complex ideas about Superman as an American ideal, though the filmmakers are obviously aware of the Bizarro context.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    A first-person documentary about a Los Angeles couple’s decision to move to the country and start a farm overcomes its excessively preciously start to become a genuinely insightful meditation on agriculture, nature, and our precarious relationship to the planet that feeds us.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Because the potential is extraordinary, it’s a surprise that the film, co-directed by Herzog and Andre Singer, is so conventional and enthusiastic, bordering on adoring.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    Watching the teen romance The Sun Is Also a Star, starring the splendid-looking young couple Yara Shahidi (Blackish) and Charles Melton (Riverdale’s Reggie)), is something like wading through fields of pink candy floss and suddenly finding a speck of grit.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Liam Lacey
    While the thematic scheme may be ancient and remote, Zhang’s poetic compression and technical pizazz feel as fresh as a splash in a mountain stream.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    The White Crow is really “Nureyev before Nureyev,” and it’s a struggle to sort out its purpose.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    If you want to dramatize a real-life celebrity fraud tale, you can’t settle for the superficial. Either go for psychological truth or camp it up to the level of the superduperficial. There’s not much of either quality in JT Leroy, a film that offers colourful performances by Laura Dern and Kristen Stewart but fails to find any urgency in retelling the tale of an early 2000s literary fraud.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Though it occasionally gets a little repetitive in its use of archival devil movie and tabloid television clips, Lane’s film is mordantly funny and certainly persuasive in making the case that religion should be kept out of politicians’ dirty hands.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    In a less careful movie, with a less relatable performance, this kind of narrative clumsiness would be ruinous. Here, it’s more like a permissible flaw in someone you care for too much to give up on.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    Anyone expecting a crowd-pleasing crossover movie from the French director of modern art-house landmarks like Beau Travail and 35 Shots of Rum may be ill-prepared for this perplexing, repellent/fascinating vision of bodies in tight spaces.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Perhaps the only scary thing about the new horror movie The Curse of La Llarona is the fear of mispronouncing the title.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The studio set recreation of Hong Kong’s famous Bar Street, along with the gaudily delectable costumes throughout, give Master Z a dreamy heightened artifice. More than once, the film seems on the verge of breaking into a vintage Hollywood musical.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    If you think Little sounds like something a 10-year-old might come up with after seeing Tom Hanks’ Big, you would be entirely correct.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    No doubt, it’s pretty great to watch and listen to Franklin, 29 at the time and at the height of her powers, demonstrating her mastery in the genre of music she grew up on.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Yet another stilted comic thriller.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    The Brink, director Alison Klayman’s year-long cinema verité portrait of Steve Bannon, is unlikely to change anyone’s mind about Donald Trump’s political strategist, who helped connect the candidate to white nationalists before falling out of favour.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 Liam Lacey
    Apart from the relief of seeing a conclusion to a long story, there’s scant pleasure to be found in the long-winded and jumbled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Liam Lacey
    Somehow, within this roiling pot of fancy costumes, class hatred, vicious misogyny and official corruption, we are supposed to discern the poisonous seeds of the violence that would wrack Europe. The connections are somewhat fuzzy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Neither version of the film — the talking-heads documentary or the period drama — has the depth to achieve much impact.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mann’s laidback, dramatized-reality approach to the subject is to treat Carmine Street Guitars, at 42 Carmine Street, as a village general store from another era, a place for friendly gossip and home-made goods.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Apart from a few eye-roll moments, Giant Little Ones is redeemed from coming across like a progressive after-school special by the authenticity of performances, particularly of the young actors and a refreshing open-endedness about the fluidity of sexual behaviour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Liam Lacey
    The craft of the re-enactment is more impressive than the script, which defaults to hackneyed dramatic moments, reminiscent of a generic disaster film, with its stock upstairs-downstairs tropes, young lovers, the cynic-turned-hero, and the dutiful subalterns showing courage above their pay grade.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    What we have is a solidly crafted reworking of some familiar Western tropes by director John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side, Saving Mr. Banks), a Texas native who shows care for the period details, with handsome cinematography on the original Lone Star State locations.

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