For 210 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lindsey Bahr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Worst Person in the World
Lowest review score: 25 Gemini Man
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 210
210 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    If you must reboot an over 30-year-old Disney Channel cartoon like Chip ’n Dale: Rescue Rangers, you could do much worse than looking to “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” for inspiration. But it is a high bar and though Chip ‘n Dale might not reach the heights of that Robert Zemeckis film, it is still a pleasant surprise stuffed to the brim with pop culture references that children of the Chip ’n Dale era may enjoy.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Lindsey Bahr
    There wasn’t a great reason to take another shot at Firestarter. Besides, even if it’s lacking in originality, it’s also lacking something even more important: A personality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Lindsey Bahr
    Raimi doesn’t take “Doctor Strange” to an entirely new tonal place, like, say Taika Waititi did with Thor. He mostly sticks to the framework established by Scott Derrickson.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    Hatching is an assured and promising debut for Bergholm with a jaw-dropping ending that may just cement it as a cult classic in the making.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Lindsey Bahr
    Sciamma is able to bring to life essential truths of what it is like to be that strange age and the sometimes frightening, sometimes wonderful vastness of a limitless imagination. And she even does it without a background score to manipulate our tear ducts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Lindsey Bahr
    Navalny is so taut and suspenseful you’d think John le Carré had left behind a secret manuscript that’s only just coming to light now.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Lindsey Bahr
    Though it starts off promisingly enough with Carrey’s character marooned on a “piece of shitake” mushroom planet, it soon becomes evident that this outing is a soulless attempt to up the stakes and cash in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    As with most Linklater joints, it’s so sincere and so sweetly true that you can’t really fault it for not reinventing the wheel. Just like a story that your parents have told or maybe you’ve told a million times before, it’s comforting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    It may not be great cinema in any traditional sense, but it’s great fun and a much-needed antidote to all the bad cover versions floating around.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    Pathos and action are found in equal parts in The Adam Project, the latest attempt by Netflix to create the kind of throwback blockbuster that you might have paid to see in movie theaters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Lindsey Bahr
    Everyone knows this story and how it turns out. But “Cyrano” does a wonderful job of letting you cling to the hope that it might go differently, as agonizing as it might be.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    Dog
    Ultimately it does work, but “Dog” is a movie that is trying to do quite a bit, and perhaps bites off a little more than it can reasonably handle in 90 minutes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    Marry Me hangs on Lopez who is as glowing and glamorous as ever. Lopez, as they say, understood the assignment.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Lindsey Bahr
    There is a refreshing honesty in this script, penned by Trier and his longtime collaborator Eskil Vogt, that engages with nuance and the impossible complexities of life in a way that most “rom-coms” avoid like the plague.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Lindsey Bahr
    Ultimately, “Sundown” is more of a spiritual sister to “Melancholia” with shades of “Somewhere." It is a portrait of a body whose soul has long since departed.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Lindsey Bahr
    Like a drug store chocolate bar, it just is. It might not be good for you, but it’ll go down shockingly easy, give you a minor sugar high (and possible headache) and disappear from your memory just as quickly, leaving you defenseless for when the inevitable sequel comes along.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Lindsey Bahr
    It’s hard to overstate just how garish and frenetic this whole endeavor is. Even with the explosion of colors it still strains to hold interest.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    The 355, directed by Simon Kinberg (“X-Men: Dark Phoenix”) who co-wrote with Theresa Rebeck (“Smash”), is not an instant classic by any means. It is, however, a straightforward and solidly entertaining spy thriller that (mostly) avoids the impulse to pat itself on the back too obviously.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    The framework, as predictable as it is, works because of the sincerity behind the endeavor and the depth of Collins’ performance. He is the heart and soul of Jockey, and no one who gives it a chance will be forgetting his name anytime soon.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Lindsey Bahr
    It’s a film that on one level plays like a melodrama, with wild twists and turns fitting of soap opera cliffhangers. But there is something deeper going on too, underneath the beautiful surface and base pleasures of plot and simply watching Penélope Cruz through Almodóvar’s loving lens.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Lindsey Bahr
    At a certain point, it becomes clear that not only is The King’s Man a tonal mess, it’s also just a set-up for a movie with an even more enticing cast that’ll leave you feeling even more conflicted.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    The themes are obvious and a bit old fashioned and the trajectory is too. But that’s not a ding: It’s just a neatly constructed story that stays true to its genre and time. And hopefully, it’s not the last time Morgan and del Toro revive a hidden gem.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    Sorkin bites off a lot here — he wants this film to be about everything. And the dialogue is so typically snappy that he basically gets away with it.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Lindsey Bahr
    Amin’s attempts to get to the West with his mother and brother are harrowing enough to give you an ulcer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    And in spite of the absurdity, it is stupidly watchable. If you don’t know or remember the details of what went down, save the search for after. Just wear your gaudiest designer logo, order a martini at the bar and give in to the easy pleasures of House of Gucci.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    C’mon C’mon doesn’t really go anywhere in particular. It’s a meandering experience, but purposefully so. And it’s the kind of film that makes you want to leave the theater and ask the big, cheesy, sincere questions of strangers, family, anyone really.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    There are, hopefully, still many stories left to be told about the phenom of the Williams sisters. But King Richard is a very good start.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Lindsey Bahr
    So many films are described as love letters — to places, to time, to people, to even the idea of cinema — that the phrase has almost been rendered meaningless. But Belfast really is the quintessential cinematic love letter.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    It’s still a satisfying and fun tribute to someone whose impacts on modern food culture and celebrity are still being felt. Just don’t go in hungry.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Lindsey Bahr
    You’re probably not coming to Finch for lessons, you’re coming to Finch for Hanks. The good news is that he’s not just the reason to show up, he’s the reason to stay around as well.

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