For 274 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lucy Mangan's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Mare of Easttown: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 The English Game: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 274
274 tv reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The spectacle is wonderful, and the information valuable. But perhaps by the end there will be an appetite for something more about how that fossil record tells experts what it does. ... The 10-year-old in me has awakened, and with it the atavistic childhood prime directive: trust, yet verify.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Night Sky, is really three shows in one. ... Spacek and Simmons remain Night Sky’s shining stars. If they could be hived off and the Yorks given their own eight-hour, sci-fi- and conspiracy-free series simply to show us how they navigate the last decade or so of life before it winks out, that would be wonderful.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    [Steven Moffat] takes the melodrama down a notch and salts the schmaltz with wit where he can. ... But it has two intrinsic problems to overcome – and hurdles one more successfully than the other. The first is the ick factor occasioned by Henry’s many visits as a grown man to Clare as a child. ... The other problem is more deep-rooted. Niffenegger’s story is built around Clare’s passivity. Her life, while not static or unfulfilled professionally, is defined by waiting for Henry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    We get lots of meaningful looks, covert glances or charged/pained/strained silences, and very little in between to guide us. When everything is evoked, nothing is. Such great gaps make a nonsense of the script, even when the lines themselves are good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The Lincoln Lawyer (Netflix) will do you no harm, as certainly as it will do you no good. People say things like, “You know Michael – the only thing he likes more than a fight is a fight with one hand tied behind his back,” and they manage exchanges such as “Can you work with that?” “I can win with that,” with straight faces.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Danes grounds and gives a remarkable truth to the whole. But even allowing for the fact that screen adaptations rarely capture the full filigree of a literary novelist’s work (one reason why uncomplicated genre fiction generally fares better – there is more to add, less to lose), it feels like slightly too much has been lost in translation here.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    This Is Going to Hurt is full of images and scenes that you’ll hope to forget, but, more unexpectedly, it also retains the two most difficult aspects of the book (and those, incidentally, that remain with the reader long after the foreign-objects-up-orifices anecdotage has faded). The first is the fatigue, and the fathomless stupidities, injustices and lack of resources that cause it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    All in all, a staircase well worth climbing.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is a sweet, silly, charmingly harmless thing – and funny, if you like that sort of thing, or if you are scrabbling around for any succour you can find. You could do better; you could do worse.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Even as the female victim count adds up, Shining Girls keeps its integrity and never backs away from this underlying truth.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Though the main thrust of the story is the amateur espionage and the increasing involvement of Epstein in Jordan’s world, it is in the quieter, more domestic moments that the drama is most convincing. ... The London parts, however, have a much broader-brush feel to them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The nearly three-hour running time is a measured, relentless march of contemporary footage, present-day interviews with people who worked with or knew him, the investigative journalists who eventually unearthed the evidence behind the rumours – the years and years of rumours – and one of his victims – from the years and years of victims.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It’s absolutely terrible. Morally, obviously, there is literally no justification for deliberately putting temptation in people’s way (I believe it is one of the tenets in fact of quite a few world religions). Creatively, it’s bankrupt. Educationally, intellectually it’s … not. ... But, oh, the entertainment. Oh, the escapism.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    There are plenty of laughs along the way, but it’s the unforced emotional truths that make Hacks a right and proper vehicle for Smart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    A Very British Scandal, with its lean, mean script and its refusal to reinvent the duchess as an icon of the movement, is the very best and fairest tribute that could be given her.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There are one-on-one rounds, teamwork rounds, choreography-learning rounds and occasional, fascinating fleeting mentions of the actual knowledge and insight into the very specific skills needed, and glimpses of Lizzo the working professional and businesswoman.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It has a seemingly effortless mastery of a large cast of characters, warm intelligence pervading everything, and promotes the gorgeous general sense of being held for the duration in a very safe pair of hands indeed. Like Binchy, it is also entirely addictive.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Despite all the brilliant work we have all seen Sharp, Regan and Ward do over the years, and perhaps because of the script, the acting is poor from the protagonists. It is also downright woeful from peripheral characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a wonderful and deeply enjoyable tale of rags to riches to (relative) rags, but it panders to the viewer’s schadenfreude instead of offering anything meatier, or any wider perspective or criticism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    This is very much Melngailis’s show and she is allowed to skate too easily away from whether, when and how she could have – should have – realised what he was doing, and escaped his clutches.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a lot – although the magical pill aspect is at least not dwelt on too heavily and allowed to add a full sci-fi vibe to the brew as well – and not all of it is worth it. ... But it is in many ways a career-best performance from Jackson (and from Fishback, though we must hope that hers is merely the first of many to come).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s slick, the plot runs like clockwork and – just as with the book – you can walk away at the end feeling thoroughly entertained without being able to remember a solitary thing about it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Tucci is an utterly inoffensive guide throughout this sweet, light delizia of a documentary, but there is one moment with Coccia that nicely illustrates his one weakness – which is that he is slightly too muted, too self-effacing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s fun, no more, no less. Bit of history, bit of gore, bit of sex, bit of plot, lots of hair. As mindless distraction at a gruelling time, it will be hard to beat.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Severance looks beautiful and is directed with enormous sensitivity and style by Stiller. His quartet of oddball actors, Arquette (a frequent Stiller collaborator), Turturro, Walken and Tillman, elevate an already shining script and a story that is always a finely calibrated 12 to 15 degrees off kilter, while the everyman quality of Scott throws the whole into perfect relief.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s well worth watching this fun, stylish and confident caper, which clearly still has numerous twists up its sleeve and characters to play with.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    This is a show for those mainly looking to marvel – at the effrontery, the style, the steel nerves of the twentysomething weaving webs from inside a house of cards built on thin ice. Those who are looking for an in-depth, analytical take on the Delvey phenomenon, her pathology or motivations – which the handful of previous documentaries about her have lacked – will have to wait a little longer. ... Julia Garner is mesmerising as Anna.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Amazon’s take on Reacher is as solidly made as he is and delivers the rollicking yarn as efficiently as the man himself can dispatch a Glock-wielding gangster.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Suspicion (Apple+ TV), is a loose, baggy thing that only begins to approach the necessary slickness a good quarter of the way through its eight-episode run.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    A warm, funny, intelligent and rather moving drama, with astonishing performances from Lily James as Anderson and Sebastian Stan as Lee.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Station Eleven is a slow burn. The first few episodes look beautiful but move at a stately pace. If you can stick with it, you will be rewarded.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is Froggatt’s performance that stops the story drifting into absurdity or becoming a trivialising, exploitative endeavour. This, I suppose, is good enough.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 20 Lucy Mangan
    All of human life is here. Not in any credible way – just here. ... In short, it’s just what HBO ordered from the man who by now is surely actually churning this stuff out in his sleep rather than simply giving the faultless impression of it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s the red flags that make it fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As with most series of this nature, it’s better watched over time rather than binged all at once, when the leaps of faith required to get past various illogicalities and inconsistencies can become too exhausting. It’s one of those programmes where you are best advised to sit back, relax and enjoy the ride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    This final third is a very, very slight affair. If the content of the stories had matched the painstaking form, the anthology could have been rather a groundbreaking success. As it is, the architects need to go back to the drawing board.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is a slick and calculated production, designed to give Potterheads exactly what they want, how they want it. But it contains enough untold stories and honesty from the participants and unfakeable camaraderie to give it more genuine heart than probably anyone expected.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Stay Close promises more of almost exactly the same – including Richard Armitage, who is now seedy photographer Ray and, by the end of the opening episode, about to become firmly tied into the main plot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The eight-episode season is full of beautifully honed jokes, absurdities, acute commentary (as well as some more similar to the decidedly unacute, defensive moments about “woke” criticism and contemporary issues the previous Fey/Carlock collaborations contained), sight gags and song and dance numbers. ... It is, as I say, a joy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The onslaught of “woke” teachings lends the show a smugly self-congratulatory rather than ironically self-aware air. This does nothing to make it sing like the original. ... All that said – there are reasons to hope that these are teething troubles only. There is a handful of good lines, there are flashes of the old spirit and there is one sex scene – centred round Big (“I’m getting some lube. I’m not 30”) – that recalls the genuinely pioneering original, and what fun it used to be.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It is a rich, generous, clever, multi-textured thing, immaculately played by all the main actors, but awards for Colman, Thewlis and the script must surely be given. Consider it the first of your Christmas treats.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a dense, sharply written (by Tom Edge), absolute treat of a show about a murky, unseen world that doesn’t want to break the surface and show itself, and one that viewers will surely want to dive into.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s also got an ineffable charm that allows it to add up to more than the sum of its not inconsiderable parts. So take a leap – not even a big one – of faith, and just enjoy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    For all its adherence to the psychodrama/mystery genre, Close to Me is gratifyingly full of realistic grace notes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    After a perilously laugh-free opening episode (Kayo aside, who has funny in his bones) things begin to improve. This is thanks to some beautifully pitched secondary characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Look, it’s not Wolf Hall. Nothing will ever be Wolf Hall again and although its shadow looms large, it looms unfairly and should be banished. On its own terms, Anne Boleyn works well enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Hart is a presence you want to stay with, while Snipes is so compelling you don’t really have a choice but to follow him. It just feels – a little, but inescapably – unnecessary. The points of connection between Hart and the Kid, which might have led to an examination of the power of fame and money to corrupt, are too minor to add any tension or wonderment (did he really …? Could he have possibly …?) amid such a baroquely exaggerated plot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s absolutely fine. It’s got brio, it’s got style and it’s got enough portentous voiceover book-ending events to make everything feel high stakes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The result is a series that is far more chaotic than it needs to be; the more familiar you already are with the Sackler story and the opioid crisis, the more you will get out of it, which is not the dramatic ideal. But the main points and the outrage are clear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Ferrell is too plodding a dramatic actor to bring much nuance to Marty’s vulnerability. Still, the sheer size and nerve of the three-decade scam will keep you going to the end.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a primer for newcomers, or a recap for those who want one, Catch and Kill: The TV Series of the Podcast of the Book of the Article works fine. But there is a sense of missed opportunity – whether to show what has changed since, or how far we still have to go – that makes it slightly less than the sum of its reused parts.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a good story well told and the only bum note is Stirling, whose performance is so large it unbalances the whole thing and makes one wonder why a directorial note was not given at any stage. But overall it’s a fine addition to the suburban nightmare-trove.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    There are moments when these different modes interrupt the flow to no greater end, but for the most part they work. Overall, they create a jaggedly compelling viewing experience whose form as well as content keeps us uncomfortable enough to stay alert without being alienated.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    You can feel the creators Simon Kinberg and David Weil eager to draw parallels and find resonance with current issues: the fracturing family also in effect become refugees as they attempt to flee to safety; Trevante is a hostile invader about to feel what life is like on the other side of the equation, and so on. Even so, Invasion is a slow burn that threatens to become simply slow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Filled with people who really know their anatomy and can parse a couple’s problems at 50 paces, break down their defences at 20 and get them healthily rebuilt, all without breaking a sweat. This is partly because they are intelligent and emotionally literate human beings, and partly because the problems they are dealing with are – at heart – wonderfully simple. ... These six episodes might be the most – not to say the only – truly valuable thing Goop has ever done.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Think of it as a kind of Gossip Girl with gore and credible characters. ... The whole thing is joyfully addictive, and done with brio and style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Nothing here, be it questions or attempted answers, is new. Too much has been said about every aspect of modern marriage and its breakdowns – not least, of course, as a result of Bergman’s groundbreaker – over the last few decades for that to be the goal any more. But they are rarely explored with such style, truth or credibility.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The writing – though there is in this particularly plot-heavy, season-setting opener less room for the delicate characterisation that customarily leaven the script and make you wring your hands with their deftness and intelligence – remains immaculate. The performances ... remain unimpeachable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The detail, the tenderness, the authenticity, the brilliant performances make the whole thing both a compelling drama and a potent testimony to the suffering of too many.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a programme it is righteously furious about a worthy subject and, as a result, just a little dull. The second episode, Freedom, finds its groove and works much better.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a new sci-fi show, it would be fine. As a big-budget, flagship production for Apple it looks like a fine opportunity wasted.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is, simply as an apocalypse drama, good enough. And there are, as the series progresses, signs of hope that Yorick will be relegated further into the background, the female characters will come further to the fore, and that it will start to exploit some of the gyno-opportunities offered by the premise. It could just do with getting there a bit faster, that’s all.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The focus is wider (Jean and Jakob’s is one of the many adult relationships given more attention, and there are more students introduced too) and perhaps as a result the strokes are broader.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    In the opening half things are foggy. Thanks to the performances, however (including Hubert Point-Du Jour as nurse Josh, a vital witness to botched operations), things remain compelling at an individual level.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    For those who found The Terror – with its exploration of powerlessness, isolation and good v evil – too much in a time of powerlessness, isolation and overt battles between good and evil, The North Water is a warm bath. It occasionally shows pretensions to something greater.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    I’m sure the puff nature of the piece will become less obvious as the launch approaches and genuine drama and tensions start to fill the hours. But that doesn’t alter what it is. Everyone’s time and money, all those billions of it, could be better spent.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Sparking Joy has followed the principle of the book by not messing with the original TV formula.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The show has lost none of its delicacy or nuance, nor have its makers disturbed its heart and soul – in fact, they have only added to it. All this, and extra Janice too. Quality pum-pum all round.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The conceit – a happy facade in front of friends and family, bleak realism when she’s “off” – is a good one. ... The problem comes as the series unfolds. ... We end up watching two increasingly unrelated narratives – the better of which keeps getting interrupted by a clunking 90s sitcom, complete with dull storylines about get-rich-quick schemes or the boss coming to dinner that neither illuminate nor complicate Allison’s story, nor create any thematic symbiosis.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a great achievement that none of this feels worthy or didactic. It feels like a genuine exploration, a dramatised discussion of intergenerational differences and divides that few are seeking to take the heat out of and examine with real interest. And it’s funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There are good, funny lines scattered throughout as you might expect from a Nye script (he most famously gave us Men Behaving Badly but also the darkly flashing gem that was How Do You Want Me?, with Dylan Moran and the late, lamented Charlotte Coleman) but their sudden deployment generally just adds to the sense of unevenness. ... Lumley, Havers and Hawes together though – a shining moment that will do everyone good.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Matters of agency, courage and cowardice emerge and the story starts to accrue depth along with the superficial puzzle of the kidnapping and who saw what and when. If you can deal with the trifurcated timeline, there’s much to enjoy and admire.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It all gets odder as it goes on. It’s not (just) that Hilton has only four phrases at her disposal (“So good”, “So bomb”, “Insane”, “So cute”), but that she is such a deadening presence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Script-wise, things are woeful. But the rest is great fun. It is another derivative but satisfying franchise that knows exactly what it is doing. Comfort watching in troubled times. Go out and find her.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    There is nothing new or revelatory in this documentary, I suspect, to anyone with a working knowledge of DeLorean or his rise and fall. The overall story, and its ending, is one of the oldest in the world. But it bears retelling – and this is a stylish retelling, at least – if only because we don’t seem to be any closer to learning the story’s many lessons.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Tattoo Redo manages to sidestep the elephant traps and stay light, breezy and really rather endearing, even before you add the joy of watching people create something from nothing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The broadening and deepening must have felt like a risk to everyone involved in a show predicated on bringing light comic relief to viewers, and which then became frankly essential to their mental wellbeing. But it’s paid off. They shot and they’ve scored. God bless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The series does exactly what you would expect and exactly as well. ... It’s a show about a man and his drooling dog, and superficial emotions are the order of the day. Rinse and repeat for the remaining 11 episodes, plus a season arc about a big case Scott Sr was working on secretly when he died from an apparent heart attack.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    If the whole show doesn’t add up to more than the sum of its parts, it is a lot of parts and Aduba holds them all together and makes them work. It’s worth booking your hours in again.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Schmigadoon! passes the time harmlessly enough but overall, it is a one-note show and even that is too often flat. Must hit that exclamation mark harder next time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Bea and Horgan’s chemistry is as glorious as ever. They overlap and underlap perfectly, giving expansive but controlled performances that never take from each other. It is wonderful – indeed it feels almost a privilege – to watch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    It needs another pass through the laugh factory. A thorough sanding down and a tightening of the plot screws by Mift and a few more squirts of lubricant from old hands such as Goodman and Crystal – whose scenes merely remind us of past glories – could create a vehicle truly fit for comic purpose. Monsters: get to work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    If the film lacked the surprising revelations and investigative deep dives seen in the top echelons of true crime reporting, it should find its place as a sensitive and moving attempt to sketch the outlines of horror and grief.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    A three-hour documentary should do more than competently marshal facts (even if, as this one did, it gives decent consideration and screen time to the survivors). It has room to theorise and it should take it, rather than pad the time with the likes of Pasternak (and her assurances that she is “appalled” by Maxwell’s alleged behaviour, as if the rest of us are sitting around thinking of butterflies and marshmallows) and former friends with nothing personal or perceptive to say.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The great sorrow is that Disney does not have the courage – or perhaps desire – to lean in to the potential offered by this now-prescient and fertile setup.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Transcending the directorial workmanship and production values, however, is the simple sight of unfashionable – which is to say good, ideologically informed but practically executed – work being done on behalf of the disfranchised, the powerless, the underserved. It is deeply thrilling to watch. An unfamiliar feeling stirs, and rises higher with each episode. The feeling is hope.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    Everyone in the cast does good work with their thinly written characters, who have few redeeming features among them. Not least Byrne, whose commitment makes Sheila credible even in her most vicious or unlikely moments (stealing video equipment from a potential political ally foremost among them). But Physical feels like a wasted opportunity generally.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It sets the bar pleasingly high, with a stellar cast giving uniformly great performances. (Jumbo was made for grief and fury, while Howle is tremendous as a nervy bundle of torments.) It also boasts a lovely, allusive script (particularly in the scenes between Strangeways and his therapist, played by Nathaniel Parker), and a well-paced plot that only occasionally depends on slightly unconvincing breakthrough moments in Frances’s amateur investigation.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The first two episodes of Loki (which were all that was made available for review – there are six in total), however, felt flat. The opener was a lengthy, exposition-heavy setup that felt very static, and the second spent its first half going over much the same ground. ... Still, things do perk up by the very end of the second episode.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    The series is overstuffed and airless.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is either warmly eccentric or hysterically crazy, perfect entertainment or a horrifying attempt to parlay the pandemic into a commercially palatable mashup. It is undoubtedly aimed at a younger-than-full-adult audience; my 10-year-old is entranced. I am, too, although I can’t yet work out why.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Once you are over this slightly improbable premise and a slightly flat first episode while everybody finds their rhythm in this fairytale-inflected Hackney romcom, there is a lot to enjoy. There’s Matafeo’s performance for starters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    We can call it The One That Was Just Good Enough. The One That Was a Nostalgia Fest Not Revisionist History. The One That Did What It Needed to Do. The One That Was Fine.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    A feast for the mind, heart and soul.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Lucy Mangan
    However real and affecting their experiences and difficulties are (and all those in Say It Out Loud are genuine, passionately articulated and frequently deeply moving), celebrity offerings valorise simply “telling your story”, not judging yourself and others, refusing to accept stigma and so on. Which is all well and good and necessary but does absolutely nothing to address how ordinary people are supposed to achieve this when the waiting lists for the services they need to access stretch to infinity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The End is a meditation on what makes life worth living and how much of it is within our control. Edie is probably a natural termagant who would never have been the life and soul of the party, but her story invites us to think about how events cannot help but shape us.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    Mbedu – already a star in her native South Africa – is extraordinary, and embedded in an extraordinary adaptation: hallucinatory, magical, allegorical and yet permanently in the pursuit of historical and eternal truths, the resurrection of lost perspectives and the uplifting of unheard voices. Watch it, but slowly, one complex, virtuosic, heartbreaking episode at a time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Little Birds is a series that honours [Nin's stories] and their spirit, adding even more to them and making them resonate anew.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The insistent intertwining of the pain with the laughter, instead of flattening the tale into a Wodehouse-with-women yarn, makes this adaptation feel like a classic in its own right. It is a treat for all.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s all engaging enough, but a certain airlessness constrains the entertainment value. ... The problem is that it comes perilously close to taking itself too seriously. Any opportunity for fun is shut down by perpetually morose teens, action set-pieces we have seen many times before and clunky speeches about the state of the world.

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