For 274 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lucy Mangan's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Vigil: Season 1
Lowest review score: 20 The Wedding Coach: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 274
274 tv reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Station Eleven is a slow burn. The first few episodes look beautiful but move at a stately pace. If you can stick with it, you will be rewarded.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is Froggatt’s performance that stops the story drifting into absurdity or becoming a trivialising, exploitative endeavour. This, I suppose, is good enough.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 20 Lucy Mangan
    All of human life is here. Not in any credible way – just here. ... In short, it’s just what HBO ordered from the man who by now is surely actually churning this stuff out in his sleep rather than simply giving the faultless impression of it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s the red flags that make it fun.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As with most series of this nature, it’s better watched over time rather than binged all at once, when the leaps of faith required to get past various illogicalities and inconsistencies can become too exhausting. It’s one of those programmes where you are best advised to sit back, relax and enjoy the ride.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    This final third is a very, very slight affair. If the content of the stories had matched the painstaking form, the anthology could have been rather a groundbreaking success. As it is, the architects need to go back to the drawing board.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It is a slick and calculated production, designed to give Potterheads exactly what they want, how they want it. But it contains enough untold stories and honesty from the participants and unfakeable camaraderie to give it more genuine heart than probably anyone expected.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Stay Close promises more of almost exactly the same – including Richard Armitage, who is now seedy photographer Ray and, by the end of the opening episode, about to become firmly tied into the main plot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The eight-episode season is full of beautifully honed jokes, absurdities, acute commentary (as well as some more similar to the decidedly unacute, defensive moments about “woke” criticism and contemporary issues the previous Fey/Carlock collaborations contained), sight gags and song and dance numbers. ... It is, as I say, a joy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The onslaught of “woke” teachings lends the show a smugly self-congratulatory rather than ironically self-aware air. This does nothing to make it sing like the original. ... All that said – there are reasons to hope that these are teething troubles only. There is a handful of good lines, there are flashes of the old spirit and there is one sex scene – centred round Big (“I’m getting some lube. I’m not 30”) – that recalls the genuinely pioneering original, and what fun it used to be.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It is a rich, generous, clever, multi-textured thing, immaculately played by all the main actors, but awards for Colman, Thewlis and the script must surely be given. Consider it the first of your Christmas treats.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a dense, sharply written (by Tom Edge), absolute treat of a show about a murky, unseen world that doesn’t want to break the surface and show itself, and one that viewers will surely want to dive into.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    It’s also got an ineffable charm that allows it to add up to more than the sum of its not inconsiderable parts. So take a leap – not even a big one – of faith, and just enjoy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    For all its adherence to the psychodrama/mystery genre, Close to Me is gratifyingly full of realistic grace notes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    After a perilously laugh-free opening episode (Kayo aside, who has funny in his bones) things begin to improve. This is thanks to some beautifully pitched secondary characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Look, it’s not Wolf Hall. Nothing will ever be Wolf Hall again and although its shadow looms large, it looms unfairly and should be banished. On its own terms, Anne Boleyn works well enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Hart is a presence you want to stay with, while Snipes is so compelling you don’t really have a choice but to follow him. It just feels – a little, but inescapably – unnecessary. The points of connection between Hart and the Kid, which might have led to an examination of the power of fame and money to corrupt, are too minor to add any tension or wonderment (did he really …? Could he have possibly …?) amid such a baroquely exaggerated plot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s absolutely fine. It’s got brio, it’s got style and it’s got enough portentous voiceover book-ending events to make everything feel high stakes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    The result is a series that is far more chaotic than it needs to be; the more familiar you already are with the Sackler story and the opioid crisis, the more you will get out of it, which is not the dramatic ideal. But the main points and the outrage are clear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    Ferrell is too plodding a dramatic actor to bring much nuance to Marty’s vulnerability. Still, the sheer size and nerve of the three-decade scam will keep you going to the end.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a primer for newcomers, or a recap for those who want one, Catch and Kill: The TV Series of the Podcast of the Book of the Article works fine. But there is a sense of missed opportunity – whether to show what has changed since, or how far we still have to go – that makes it slightly less than the sum of its reused parts.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    It’s a good story well told and the only bum note is Stirling, whose performance is so large it unbalances the whole thing and makes one wonder why a directorial note was not given at any stage. But overall it’s a fine addition to the suburban nightmare-trove.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    There are moments when these different modes interrupt the flow to no greater end, but for the most part they work. Overall, they create a jaggedly compelling viewing experience whose form as well as content keeps us uncomfortable enough to stay alert without being alienated.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    You can feel the creators Simon Kinberg and David Weil eager to draw parallels and find resonance with current issues: the fracturing family also in effect become refugees as they attempt to flee to safety; Trevante is a hostile invader about to feel what life is like on the other side of the equation, and so on. Even so, Invasion is a slow burn that threatens to become simply slow.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Filled with people who really know their anatomy and can parse a couple’s problems at 50 paces, break down their defences at 20 and get them healthily rebuilt, all without breaking a sweat. This is partly because they are intelligent and emotionally literate human beings, and partly because the problems they are dealing with are – at heart – wonderfully simple. ... These six episodes might be the most – not to say the only – truly valuable thing Goop has ever done.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Think of it as a kind of Gossip Girl with gore and credible characters. ... The whole thing is joyfully addictive, and done with brio and style.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    Nothing here, be it questions or attempted answers, is new. Too much has been said about every aspect of modern marriage and its breakdowns – not least, of course, as a result of Bergman’s groundbreaker – over the last few decades for that to be the goal any more. But they are rarely explored with such style, truth or credibility.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Lucy Mangan
    The writing – though there is in this particularly plot-heavy, season-setting opener less room for the delicate characterisation that customarily leaven the script and make you wring your hands with their deftness and intelligence – remains immaculate. The performances ... remain unimpeachable.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Lucy Mangan
    The detail, the tenderness, the authenticity, the brilliant performances make the whole thing both a compelling drama and a potent testimony to the suffering of too many.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Lucy Mangan
    As a programme it is righteously furious about a worthy subject and, as a result, just a little dull. The second episode, Freedom, finds its groove and works much better.

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