For 348 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 Mesrine: Public Enemy No. 1
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 29 out of 348
348 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Jenkins
    Aside from being a thrilling account of a hair-raising rescue, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin’s documentary attests to living a calling.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Lucy Walker’s absorbing study of California’s 2018 wildfires consistently goes in illuminating and surprising directions.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The film’s terseness could make it too cryptic for some, but that doesn’t blunt the impact of its most visceral or tender moments.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    While 52 remains something of a mystery, The Loneliest Whale renders him less of a metaphor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    After watching this Welsh racehorse drama, even those of us who’d struggle to pronounce the word may find ourselves feeling a bit of hwyl.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The documentary adroitly demonstrates that Robert Fisk is still motivated by the boyish curiosity that drew him to journalism.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Its few nutty ideas demonstrate how little distance Unpregnant manages to put between itself and a standard high-school comedy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The script doesn’t contain many lines that ring true, and a few clang wildly off-key.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A sort of “Me, God and the Dying Girl,” the movie is well-made (if slow) and features an attractive cast and a lot of amiable (if bland) religious pop-rock.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Overlong and overstuffed with Southern rock and blues numbers, Burden is not exemplary filmmaking. But for viewers who can endure another spin through white-supremacist malice and ignorance, Hedlund and Riseborough make it a compelling ride.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The Kingmaker chills the soul by presenting shantytown residents and school kids who extol the Marcos regime and even endorse its eight-year period of martial law.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    The story of an insurgent Indian woman certainly seems timely in 2019. Too bad the new account of her uprising, The Warrior Queen of Jhansi, is as stodgy as a movie from 1958, if not earlier.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Swaggers across the landscape like a cinematic epic, but it’s basically a concert flick, with some extras. And those extras are not the best things in it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Jenkins
    One Child Nation covers a lot of a territory, and many of its topics need to be covered in more depth. But the directors structure the narrative effectively, and they deftly expand from the personal to the historical. This is an important film, if often a difficult one to watch.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    The movie’s ending could be called a twist. But it’s really more of a belly flop.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The result won’t sway nonbelievers, but is mostly watchable and occasionally even moving.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is so flimsy that people might wonder how it could possibly have been made.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Even ardent Pattinson fandom won’t be enough to convert mainstream American audiences to the art-house director’s dark outlook and elliptical style.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    The Best of Enemies is perhaps the first account of the United States’s traumatic racial history that could be adapted into a sitcom.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    If the new biopic Mapplethorpe presents this transgressive vision is vivid detail — and it does — that’s only because it includes so many of Mapplethorpe’s pictures. Everything else in the film is timid and pedestrian.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    There are some amusing (and even poignant) moments between Franky and the two girls, who are the movie’s most interesting characters. But all the parents come across as stiff and hollow, and so does Ballas.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    It’s a more visceral trip than any moviegoer — even the armchair experts — has ever taken before.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    An action thriller in which the Irish actor plays Nels Coxman, a snowplow operator at a Colorado ski resort with the death-dealing skills of a special-ops commando. This time, the absurdity is intentional.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    While it’s not exactly a sequel to “RBG,” the hit documentary from earlier this year, the film does seem designed primarily for viewers who just can’t get enough Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Viewed through that lens, On the Basis of Sex sort of works. As filmmaking, it’s clunky, but as fan service, it’s more effective.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The tight time frame gives the movie a welcome urgency, but it doesn’t prevent its second half from becoming lurid and melodramatic.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Boy Erased is a showcase for Hedges, who played a closeted boy in “Lady Bird” and who plays a teen with a different sort of burden in the upcoming drama “Ben Is Back.” In each of those roles, the boy-next-door actor finds just the right combination of ordinary and anomalous.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    What works best here comes between the movie’s heavy opening and its lightweight conclusion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Fortunately, the maudlin moments are offset by fine performances, flashes of humor and a visual sense that’s more astute than the script.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Greengrass employs a handheld camera effectively, as usual, to simulate confusion, panic and terror. He cuts away from the most horrific moments of slaughter.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Jenkins
    Like most mysteries, this one relies heavily on coincidental discoveries, even if they arrive via Gmail or FaceTime, rather than more traditional means. But the plot’s contrivances are less problematic than the movie’s insistence on maintaining its artifice even after it becomes a hindrance.

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