For 115 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Kennedy's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Encanto
Lowest review score: 0 Benedetta
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 67 out of 115
  2. Negative: 36 out of 115
115 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    What makes The Black Phone stand out is how it perfectly captures what growing up was like in the often raw ’70s and an utter respect for the world of kids. Every adult is either dismissive and distant — or downright murderous.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Kennedy
    Lessin and Pildes do a masterful job of putting the Janes in historical context, seeing how their desire to offer safe abortions grew out of the revolutionary ’60s and yet how women’s issues were often deemed secondary to male-led efforts.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Kennedy
    Men
    The problem with Men isn’t with the acting. It’s with a script that could be described as attempting at something like arty horror and can’t stick the landing. Often it is tedious, slow to build and pretentious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Kennedy
    The film handles Maverick’s personal stuff — wooing the barmaid, repairing his relationship with Goose’s kid — while also fulfilling its promise as an action movie. There are jets pulling 10Gs, the metal sound of cockpit sticks pulled in gear, epic dogfights and the whine of machinery balking at the demands put on it. The action even takes a few unexpected and thrilling turns.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Kennedy
    Bourgeois-Tacquet, making her feature debut, struggles to find ways to tell the audience what’s going on her heroine’s head.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Kennedy
    There’s always something a little off about Father Stu, a sense that the filmmakers have taken a lot of liberties with a real life to make it extra saintly.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Kennedy
    The filmmakers — director Daniel Espinosa, hobbled by a meandering script from Matt Sazama and Burk Sharpless — simply do not know what to do with this creature once they’ve given us his backstory.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 12 Mark Kennedy
    Deep Water, despite an all-star team behind it, barely makes a splash. Although it is being billed as an erotic thriller, it’s tedious and clunky. Trips to the supermarket are more exciting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    Lucy and Desi traces the rise, union and collapse of this larger-than-life couple who made a fortune thanks to “I Love Lucy” and remade TV along the way. There’s a lot to chew on and the film lacks a certain sharpness, exploring one fascinating framing device after another only to eventually abandon each one.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Kennedy
    As an acting exercise, it’s intriguing — barely any scene partners and all unfolding in real time. As a film, not so much: After a plodding, placid start, it goes from first gear into fifth and never relents as the woes pile on.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    After a bit of a slow start, “Moonfall” gets absolutely trippy in the last third as it details a mind-blowing alternative history to mankind that spans millennia and distant planets and backs it all up with gorgeous, massive special effects. Logic is abandoned altogether but few will care.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Kennedy
    Visually and storytelling-wise it’s not a cut above much of what kids can watch on TV these days. This is a franchise that looks like it’s slowly going the way of the dinos, while we drool.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 0 Mark Kennedy
    January is often where bad films are stashed, but “The King’s Daughter” isn’t just bad, it’s a cloying, cliched mess that’s not worth even the slightest risk of contacting COVID-19 to see in theaters.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Kennedy
    Washington earns his audience’s tears with an unrushed, unshowy style, letting an adult and very human relationship evolve on camera, skipping back and forth through years as it goes from love, birth, death and acceptance.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Kennedy
    The Tender Bar is a gentle, oddly crafted but loving look at men, fueled by a soundtrack of classics like Paul Simon’s “50 Ways to Leave Your Lover” and Steely Dan’s “Do It Again.” It’s a valentine to guys who step up.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    Red Rocket could have soared in a traditional Hollywood feel-good way but instead stays small and down to the ground, sticking with you uncomfortably and brilliantly.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 0 Mark Kennedy
    There is perhaps an intriguing movie here somewhere — “Who decides what is God’s will?” is one lingering question —but to find it you have to slice away all the bawdy and ultra-violent excesses that are clearly intended to push buttons, like a 5-year-old testing her parents’ patience. Yawn.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Mark Kennedy
    It’s only appropriate that Encanto — fueled by eight original songs by Hamilton creator Lin-Manuel Miranda — turns into that most special thing of all: A triumph in every category: art, songs and heart.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Kennedy
    It is more like half a movie, standing in the shadow of its parent. It is a film made to sell us more lunchboxes.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Kennedy
    Zhao, whose film Nomadland was everything this is not — spare, naturalistic, moody — struggles with so much going on. The fight scenes are repetitive and the dialogue often stilted.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    It’s a film no one really demanded and yet is loads of fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Kennedy
    Ron’s Gone Wrong thinks it’s being subversive when its really being very corporate. It wastes its voice cast — including Olivia Colman, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis — and it never really connects, ending as awkwardly as a modern-day seventh-grader with a rock collection.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Kennedy
    One problem here is time, something the film obviously plays with. The Many Saints of Newark arrives 14 years after The Sopranos ended and that may be too long for anyone but the most ardent fan to keep up. The brain strains trying to connect new faces with old ones.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Mark Kennedy
    The film is apparently supposed to be a meditation on masculinity, with Eastwood’s one-time rodeo star Mike Milo taming and rebuilding his young rebellious charge into an honorable young man. Instead, it’s a meditation on clumsy and predictable filmmaking.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    Beneath the beauty and the violence is a story about the ties between siblings, fatherly expectations, the modern world’s demands versus traditions and our own legacies.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Kennedy
    DaCosta can make a stroll down a well-lit, modern and clean hallway somehow creepy. This is confident, smart filmmaking. There’s a stunning scene in which the Candyman mirrors his prey’s movements and one in an elevator where blood droplets create their own horror-inside-horror.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Kennedy
    At the film’s center is Q but there is a hollowness there. She can rappel down a staircase using a fire hose, endure waterboarding and use a dinner tray as an assault weapon, but there’s little insight in her inner life or emotions and her backstory appears too late.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Kennedy
    The script by Tracey Scott Wilson (Fosse/Verdon) is a collection of scenes that don’t add up to much, never really building and interrupted — by necessity, of course — with overly long music sequences. This film needed someone to sharpen and clarify.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Kennedy
    Bill is a hard part to pull off, but Damon does, creating a flawed but compassionate character, made doubly hard since he outwardly reveals little emotion.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Kennedy
    Val
    Thanks to Kilmer’s relentless drive to document things, Val is a remarkably intimate film and a moving one, too. For a performer who has come off as chilly and difficult, this doc doesn’t counter those perceptions as much as explain them.

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