For 164 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Kermode's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 They Shall Not Grow Old
Lowest review score: 60 The House That Jack Built
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 164
164 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    None of which is to say that Good Luck to You, Leo Grande isn’t admirably subversive and enjoyably whimsical fare.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    It doesn’t help that Dominion spends a good deal of time trying to figure out what story to tell and which genre (or country) to tell it in.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    Men
    It’s a playfully twisted affair – not quite as profound as it seems to think, perhaps, but boasting enough squishy metaphorical slime to ensure that its musings upon textbook male characteristics are rarely dull, and sometimes deliciously disgusting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Top Gun: Maverick offers exactly the kind of air-punching spectacle that reminds people why a trip to the cinema beats staying at home and watching Netflix.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Behind it all is an endlessly saddening search for that transformative sacrament evoked by the film’s title – alluring yet elusive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    The result may be a tad overlong and convolutedly overstuffed, but it made me laugh, cry and think – which is more than can be said for many a Marvel flick.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    The atmosphere is stripped down and austere, allowing the songs to speak for themselves as they transport us from this world to the next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    While the Norns-of-fate narrative may contrive several reversals of fortune and sympathy, there’s little of the genuinely uncanny weirdness that made Eggers’s first two features such a treat. What madness lies herein is not of the north-northwest variety but more in keeping with the bonkers blockbuster spectacle of Darren Aronofsky’s Noah.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Beautifully believable performances from Haarla and Borisov add emotional weight, rivalling the nuanced naturalistic charm of Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy in Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Ali & Ava is a vibrant work that uses the transcendent power of song to turn a streetwise tale into a diegetic musical, with genuinely surprising results.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Blending melancholy wistfulness with unruly energy and piercing humour, it’s a down-to-earth tale of love and death, boosted by a brilliantly believable central performance and elevated by fantastical moments of hallucinogenic horror and ecstatic joy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    With great physical poise and precision, Wilson (who optioned and developed the source book) engages the audience on a visceral level, her deceptively low-key performance taking us deep inside her character’s dreams, desires and insecurities.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    This is a playfully sensuous affair that wonders what happens to slow-burn intimacy when mediated by the urgency of the online world.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    As for Baker and regular co-writer Chris Bergoch, they refrain from judging their characters, observing the world from Mikey’s maniacally self-serving point of view even as comedy turns to queasiness and worse.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    While The Duke is never quite as surprising as the case that inspired it, it nonetheless retains a much-needed astringent streak.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    This is a triumph-of-the-human-spirit story as dramatic as the most finely wrought melodrama, with flashes of vintage newsreels reminding us that it is all “real”.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Mark Kermode
    Years ago, I compared Del Toro to Orson Welles, a film-maker who instinctively understood the hypnotic power of cinema to dazzle, delight and deceive. On the basis of Nightmare Alley, which is blessed with more than a touch of evil, that’s a comparison by which I still stand.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    The film takes a fantastical leap that viewers will find either breathtaking or ridiculous – probably a bit of both.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Some will be repelled, many will be bamboozled. But for those with an appetite for cinema that gets you in the gut, Ducournau delivers the goods.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    The result is a spicy nerve-jangler served with a chargrilled side order of jet-black gallows humour – a divine comedy barrelling towards inevitable tragedy, played out in hell’s kitchen where someone is bound to get burned.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Like all the best evocations of times past, Licorice Pizza has no answers – only an enraptured sense of awe that makes Anderson’s joyous film feel like a very personal memory.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    As always, Colman manages to express deep wellsprings of emotion with few words and fewer gestures – her face telegraphing great swathes of anguish beneath polite smiles and annoyed glances.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    Where Spielberg and screenwriter Tony Kushner’s version comes into its own is in the moments where it dares to find its own distinct voice – nowhere more so than in placing Somewhere in the hands of Rita Moreno.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    For better or worse, House of Gucci is a little too well behaved to become a cult classic. But Gaga deserves a gong for steering a steely path through the madness – for richer, not poorer; in kitschness and in wealth.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Mark Kermode
    Petite Maman is short and sweet, yet fearlessly profound. A mix of fairytale, ghost story and rites-of-passage journey, this is at heart a cinematic parable about healing intergenerational wounds, about breaching the barriers that inevitably grow between parents and children.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    It’s the more deceptively restrained and poetic elements that strike home.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Playing out over three excruciating days at Sandringham – from Christmas Eve to Boxing Day – and carried shoulder high by a note-perfect Kristen Stewart, Spencer (the very title of which seems to present a challenge to the House of Windsor) dances between ethereal ghost story, arch social satire and no-holds-barred psychodrama, while remaining at heart a paean to motherhood.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    For all its scattershot reference points, however, Last Night in Soho still emerges as Wright’s most personal film – you can feel how much he loves the material. Frankly, I felt the same way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Kermode
    Right now, Villeneuve is riding the sinewy worm of Herbert’s sacred text with aplomb.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Kermode
    Despite a spirited performance from Comer and an impressive roster of supporting turns (including a scene-stealing Harriet Walter as Jean’s withering mother, Nicole), The Last Duel has a tendency to mirror its central battle’s attempts to address complex issues with the blunt tool of rabble-rousing spectacle.

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